Armchairs

Recommended lots

Salon furniture with frame, consisting of four Queen-size armchairs and a sofa In molded, carved and gilded wood, decorated with acanthus leaves, cartouches and a cordiform cartel, the backrest is curved, the armrests fitted with cuffs and resting on curved consoles applied with velum, the belt resting on cambered feet, each armchair stamped TILLIARD and incised respectively I, II, III and VI on the rear crosspiece. The sofa rests on 7 feet. H.: 96 cm; L.: 67 cm. Louis XV period. Jean-Baptiste II Tilliard, master in 1752, supplier to the Mobilier de la Couronne. Upholstered in green silk velvet with braid; (Minor accidents, wear and gilding). This elegant salon furniture is characterized by its supple lines punctuated by velvets and cordial cartouches. The heart-shaped cartouche motif can be found on many of Tilliard's chairs, such as the bergère illustrated in G. Janneau, Les Sièges, Librairie Duponchelle, Paris, 1967, pl. 175. Son of Jean Baptiste I Tilliard, Jean Baptiste II became a master carpenter in 1752, but was not registered until 1764, when he took over the family workshop on rue de Clery on his father's retirement at the age of 78. He continued his father's work, with, of course, the normal evolution of styles. As both father and son used the same stamp without specifying their first names, it is not always possible to differentiate between their creations. Jean Baptiste II took over his father's position as "menuisier ordinaire du Garde Meuble de la couronne" and received major orders from the royal houses. Having made his fortune, he retired from business during the French Revolution and died in 1797. The chairs attributed to Jean Baptiste II bear his father's signature features, such as the heart-shaped carvings at the top of the backrests and the fan-shaped pleated palmette at the top of the legs. In keeping with the fashion of the day, he adopted interlacing, acanthus leaves, ribbons, garlands, roses and baskets of flowers to decorate his works. For the Château de Versailles, he delivered an important piece of furniture decorated with musical loves and trophies. For a suite of four armchairs of the same model, see sale Christie's Nov 6, 2014 lot 227

Estim. 50,000 - 60,000 EUR

JOE COLOMBO (Milan, 1930-1971), Elda Chair, 1963. First edition. Fiberglass frame and green velvet upholstery. The shell shows slight wear due to use and the passage of time. Measurements: 95 x 95 x 95 cm. This is an emblematic piece of Space Age aesthetics. With its bulbous fiberglass shell and its small leather cushions drawing attractive meanders when joined, it debuted on the big screen in a James Bond film (The Spy Who Loved Me, 1977). Joe Colombo, its creator, is known for his retro-futuristic designs. According to the legend about this iconic armchair, after visiting a shipyard that manufactured fiberglass hulls for ships, Joe Colombo was inspired. He appropriated that molding technique for the "Elda" shell. The result was a spacious, futuristic chair in which seven removable cushions are attached to a molded plastic frame on a swivel base. He named it after his wife, Elda. Architect and designer Cesare Colombo nicknamed "Joe" Colombo, was an artist, architect, furniture, product and interior designer who was essential to Italian design in the 1960s. Trained at the Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture of the Polytechnic University of Milan, where he devoted himself, among other things, to painting, sculpture and drawing, skills that would serve him to develop his career as a designer by creating his own studio in 1962. Throughout the 1960s he collaborated with important publishers such as Kartell, O-Luce and Zanotta. Many of his works are still exhibited in museums around the world and the artist is the subject of periodic retrospectives, studies and exhibitions. During the 1960s, the designer worked mainly on the creation of furniture that stood out for being easily modular, flexible and practical, as is the case with these chairs, which can be transported and adapted to the needs of their user. He focused on a global design, where the furniture elements transcend space and architecture. In this way, Colombo moves towards a form of design that helps the user to save space and time. Some of the Italian designer's most famous works are the "Elda" armchair (1963), the "Continental Library" (1965), the "Universal" (1967) and "Tube" chairs (1969) and the "Chariot Boby" (1969). His career and achievements led him to participate in the XIV Milan Triennale, exhibiting some interior design proposals. In 1964 he won the gold medal at the Milan Triennale with the acrylic table lamp, which is now part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in Philadelphia. In 1972, shortly after his death, his overall furniture project was exhibited in the exhibition "Italy: The New Domestic Landscape" held at the MOMA in New York, realized by ELCO - FIARM, Boffi, Ideal - Standard, with the help of Sormani. In 1984, a retrospective of his work was held at the Museum of Modern Art in Villeneuve. Later, in 2005, the Milan Triennale hosted the retrospective Joe Colombo Inventing the Future.

Estim. 8,500 - 9,000 EUR

In the style of JOSEF HOFFMANN (Brtnice, Czech Republic, 1870 - Vienna, 1956). Pair of armchairs. Walnut wood. Fabric upholstery with floral decoration. With signs of wear and tear. With xylophages. The wood needs to be reworked. Measurements: 73 x 55 x 47 cm. Pair of armchairs of Central European style, framed within the Viennese Secession, with structure in walnut wood with structure of parallel bands, functional and of refined volumes. An architect and industrial designer, Josef Hoffmann studied at the Academy of Applied Arts in Vienna, where he was a disciple of Carl Freiherr von Hasenauer and Otto Wagner, whose theories of functional, modern architecture would profoundly influence his work. He won the Prix de Rome in 1895, and the following year he joined Wagner's office, collaborating with Olbrich on some projects for the Metropolitan. He established his own office in 1898, and taught at the School of Decorative Arts in Vienna between 1899 and 1936. He was also a founding member of the Viennese Secession. In 1900 he travelled to London, where he came into contact with the English school and discovered Mackintosh. On his return, he set up a workshop for the production of objects based on designs by Secession artists, and the Wiener Werkstätte was born, a workshop which had a great influence on 20th-century industrial design. By 1903, production began on an international scale. In the course of his life, Hoffmann produced a variety of projects for buildings and furnishings, and exhibited his creations all over the world. He is currently represented in the MAK and the Leopold Museum in Vienna, the Metropolitan and MoMA in New York, the Brohan in Berlin, the Courtauld Institute in London and the Victoria & Albert in London, among many others.

Estim. 800 - 1,000 EUR

CHARLES RENNIE MACKINTOSH (Scotland, 1868 - 1928) by Alivar. "Armchair model 312 Willow". Edited in 1985. Black stained ash and green leatherette upholstered seat. It has marks of use. Presents stamp on the inside of the seat cover. Measurements: 119 x 94 x 43 cm. This throne-shaped armchair is a 1985 edition of the model that Charles Rennie donated, in 1904, to the "Willow Tea Rooms" in Glasgow, his hometown. The tall semicircular backrest served to separate the entrance area from the tea room behind it. The back encompasses the seat, perfectly illustrating Mackintosh's geometric, Art Nouveau style. The creation of this chair involved the marriage of the most advanced technology and the finest carpentry skills. The latter can be seen in the precision required to assemble the components that make up the elegant, lightweight latticed frame. Mackintosh was a Scottish architect, designer and watercolorist who played a key role in the Arts & Crafts movement and was also the leading exponent of Art Nouveau in the United Kingdom. He decided to devote himself to architecture at the age of sixteen, and during his life he dedicated himself to transforming the buildings, furniture and art of Glasgow. Virtually all of his furniture creations were designed by Mackintosh for the tea rooms he decorated, the most famous of which was the Willow Tea Room. He rose to fame after exhibiting his pieces at the Vienna Secession exhibition of 1900. In fact, his style was one of the most prominent of modernism in its geometric version, also practiced by the Viennese. Thus, he developed a work marked by decorative sobriety and straight lines. He shares with organic modernism the search for asymmetry and inspiration in the plant world, but his interpretation is radically different. Most of his work is collected in the Hunterian Art Gallery of the University of Glasgow, as well as in the Metropolitan Museum and MoMA in New York, the Orsay Museum in Paris, the Design Museum, the Tate Gallery and the Victoria & Albert in London, among others. It has marks of use.

Estim. 700 - 900 EUR

LUDWIG MIES VAN DER ROHE (Germany, 1886 - USA, 1969) for KNOLL. Armchair "Barcelona". Chromed steel frame. Loose comfort cushions upholstered in leather sewn with cognac-colored buttons. Lower upholstery with cognac-colored leather straps. With Knoll publisher's label. Literature: C. & P. Fiell. 1000 chairs. Listed and photographed on p. 172. Presented in original packaging. Measurements: 80 x 75 x 80 cm. Package dimensions: 84 x 89 x 84 cm. The Barcelona chair (model MR90) is a classic work of 20th century industrial design. Mies van der Rohe created it, together with the ottoman and the matching side table, for the German pavilion at the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition, a building that was also a milestone in the architecture of the last century. The chairs were so admired that they were used as thrones for the kings of Spain when they visited the Barcelona pavilion. They were seats with a structure made entirely of polished stainless steel, with the seat and backrest completely covered with pigskin upholstery. Later, in 1950, some adjustments would be made to the design for mass production. Van der Rohe based his creation, in his personal line of modern classicism, on the "sella curulis", a type of seat used by Roman magistrates in antiquity. On the other hand, the visible joining of the stretcher frame and seat cushions as separate components, and the combined use of traditional and modern materials, appropriately matched to their function, eloquently reveal Mies' personal vision of international style. Today, both the Barcelona chair and the matching ottoman and side table are still in production by Knoll, the firm that purchased the license from the architect in 1953. Modern models are produced in two different steel configurations, and in various types of leather in different colors. Examples of the Barcelona chair are now held in important collections around the world, including the MoMA in New York. An architect and industrial designer, Mies van der Rohe trained with Bruno Paul and Peter Behrens, and opened his own studio in Berlin in 1912. Between 1930 and 1933 he directed the Bauhaus in Dessau, although the political situation in Germany soon after forced him to emigrate to the United States. There he continued his brilliant career, teaching at the Illinois Technology Institute in Chicago. During his career he designed emblematic buildings mainly in Germany and the United States, especially his skyscrapers in New York and Chicago, the German Pavilion for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition, and the NeueNationalgalerie in Berlin.

Estim. 5,000 - 5,500 EUR

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 - 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. "Egg Chair. Designed in 1958-59 as part of the overall interior design of the Royal Copenhagen Hotel. Tilting and swivel armchair, originally upholstered in black "Aura/classic" leather, central column with square aluminium base. Made in Fritz Hansen 'Brown Label' 2015 with label here, model 3316. With minor signs of wear. Literature: C Thau / K. Vindum 'Arne Jacobsen' 1998 Included mentioned p. 144, 432 reproduced p. 433, 438-439, 467, 471-472. Measurements: 104/40 cm (height). The Egg chair was designed in 1958 by Arne Jacobsen for the Radisson SAS Royal hotel in Copenhagen and was published by the Danish firm Fritz Hansen. It soon became a symbol of modern design, starring in some of the scenes of the futuristic film "2001: A Space Odyssey". Among the rest of Arne Jacobsen's designs for SAS Royal are the "Egg Chair", "Swan Chair", "Swan Sofa", "Series 3300" and "Drop Chair", furniture with which Jacobsen has written the history of Danish design all over the world. The Danish architect was one of the pioneers of the time in using new methods in furniture design, the Egg Armchair being a clear example of this. The iconic sofa consists of a one-piece, concave moulded polyurethane shell with fibreglass reinforcement, which has been covered with an elegant upholstery. The shell has an adjustable tilt mechanism, which can be adjusted to the weight of the individual user. The tilt mechanism is made of steel, while the adjustment handle is made of polished stainless steel. The result, a distinguished, pointed and unique timeless design that will stand the test of time. Architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied for four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction, then entered the Faculty of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. His architectural highlights include St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in Copenhagen, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the "Ant" chair (1951) and the "Swan" and "Egg" chairs designed for the SAS Hotel. He is also known for his 1955 model 3107 chair, also known as "Chair number 7", of which more than five million were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the film "2001: A Space Odyssey" for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's work lies in its elegant and essential design, and it can now be found in collections such as the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish firm Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, making each piece in close cooperation with internationally renowned designers and architects. Its collection includes the Egg Chair and Swan chair, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair and the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as tables and armchairs designed by Danish designers Piet Hein and Poul Kjaerholm.

Estim. 7,000 - 8,000 EUR

JORGEN KASTHOLM (Denmark, 1931 - 2007) and PREBEN FABRICIUS (Denmark, 1931 - 1984) for KILL INTERNATIONAL. Armchair with stool model FK-85. Steel frame. Black leather upholstery. Produced by Kill International, with sticker. Normal marks of use due to age. Measurements: Armchair 94 x 75 x 85 cm. Seat height 38 cm. Stool 37 x 60 x 50 cm. The FK-85 was created by designers Preben Fabricius and Jørgen Kastholm. It consists of a lightweight structure in cast aluminum, with seat, backrest and armrests upholstered in leather. Its sober and elegant design, with simple lines, makes it a timeless product but at the same time captures all the spirit of the time. It is a piece of furniture that brings together design, quality materials and functionality in a single object. Danish architect and designer Jørgen Kastholm began his training as a blacksmith, but soon left to pursue furniture design. He attended the Copenhagen School of Interior Design, where he was taught by Finn Juhl. There he also met cabinetmaker Preben Fabricius, who would later become his partner. The two shared a common vision of furniture design, based on minimalism and quality and inspired by the creations of Charles Eames and Mies van der Rohe. Their quest was to achieve an ideal that, by its simplicity, would be timeless. In 1961 they set up a studio together in Gentofte, and four years later they presented their first designs at the Federicia furniture fair, where they attracted the attention of the German furniture manufacturer Alfred Kill. The latter offered them a lucrative contract that allowed them to work freely, so Kastholm and Fabricius moved to Stuttgart with their first designs to start production in Kill's factory. Shortly thereafter, they made the international breakthrough at the 1966 Cologne trade fair, where they exhibited a complete series of home and office furniture, developed from ten of their original designs. Their minimalist creations, at once attractive and comfortable, were generally steel and leather furniture. The two creators worked together between 1961 and 1968, a seven-year period in which they produced numerous designs now considered classics, such as the Tulip Chair FK 6725, the Grasshopper FK 87 and the Scimitar. Also during this period, their furniture was part of important international exhibitions, held in such prominent centers as the MOMA in New York (1967) or the Musée d'Art Moderne in Paris (1967). Today, designs by Kastholm and Fabricius can be seen at the MACBA in Barcelona, the MOMA in New York, the Musée d'Art Moderne in Paris, the Ringling Museum in Florida, the Art Museum of Brasilia, the Design Center in Stuttgart, the Haus Industriform in Essen, the Neue Sammlung in Munich, the Staatsgemäldesammlung Bayer in Munich, the Kunstindustrimuseum in Berlin, the Kunststofmuseum in Düsseldorf, the World Import Mart Museum and the History + Folkwa.

Estim. 3,800 - 4,000 EUR

CHARLES EAMES (USA, 1907 – 1978) & RAY EAMES (USA, 1912 – 1988) for VITRA Editor. A set of eight Soft Pad armchairs, model EA-208. Designed in 1969. Full-leather edition with newly upholstered black aniline leather. Swivel base and armrests in chromed aluminium. Made at Vitra, with labels. Slight marks of use. Measurements: 85 x 58 x 58 cm; 54 cm. (seat height) The Soft Pad office chair by Charles and Ray Eames was created in 1969 for Vitra. It has an argonomic shape that adapts easily to the contours of the body, and is in keeping with the elegant language developed by the Eames couple in the fifties and sixties. Charles and Ray Eames, a married couple and artistic couple, worked in the fields of industrial and graphic design, fine art and film, and are responsible for numerous designs that have become classics of the 20th century. Charles Eames studied architecture for two years at the University of Washington, then began his career working in a studio on residential housing projects. In 1938 he moved to Cranbrook, Michigan, to continue studying architecture and design at the city's Academy of Art. He eventually became a teacher there, heading the industrial design department. Together with Eero Saarinen, the son of his teacher Eliel Saarinen, he designed the trophy for the Organic Design Prize, awarded by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In 1941, after divorcing his first wife, he married his colleague at Cranbrook, Ray Kaiser. Together they settled in Los Angeles, where they remained for the rest of their lives. In the late 1940s, Ray and Charles designed their home together, known as the "Eames House", now considered a masterpiece of modern architecture. In the 1950s the couple continued to work in architecture and furniture design, pioneering the use of new techniques and materials such as fibreglass and plastic resin in the manufacture of chairs. They are currently represented in the Design Museum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others.

Estim. 12,000 - 14,000 EUR

Wassily - Chair - design club chair B3 - pendant - design Marcel Breuer, Bauhaus, model club chair B3, this version probably late 1990s, the designer's signature embossed into the leather on the underside, frame tubular steel, high-gloss chrome-plated, cover white cowhide, partial, minimal signs of age, H/SH each approx. 73/42cm, W approx. 79cm, the original Wassily Chair is made of a special steel tube that does not deform even after prolonged use and guarantees stability, the elaborate chrome plating and the specially treated leather cover also indicate the authenticity of the design classic, in addition, for example, the caps are made of metal and are not made of plastic, which guarantees stability. The Wassily armchair was manufactured industrially by Thonet from the late 1920s, in the 1960s the Italian furniture manufacturer Dino Gavini acquired the licenses, but only produced the Wassily Chair with moderate success, it was also Gavini who gave the club chair B 3 its current name Wassily armchair for marketing reasons, in 1968 Gavini's company was then bought by Knoll International, and has been in production at the American furniture manufacturer ever since, in today's re-edition, the steel tubes are chrome-plated and not nickel-plated as originally, the covering of the frame, which forms the seat, backrest and armrests, was originally made of fabric, canvas or leather and sewn with the then completely new iron yarn - a particularly tear-resistant and hard-wearing cotton yarn, today the Wassily Chair is made by Knoll International from high-gloss chrome-plated tubular steel and a covering made of leather in various designs

No estimate

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 - 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. Coffee table model 3513. Rosewood veneered top, aluminium frame, tripod base with profiled stem. Antique model. Manufactured by Fritz Hansen. Slight signs of wear and tear due to use and age. Refurbished top. Measurements: 47.5 cm (height) x 110 cm (diameter). Round coffee table of strictly contemporary design, with a dark-grained Brazilian rosewood top and aluminium legs that extend to form a star base and join into a central shaft. An architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied for four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction and then entered the Faculty of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. His architectural highlights include St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in Copenhagen, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the "Ant" chair (1951) and the "Swan" and "Egg" chairs designed for the SAS Hotel. He is also known for his 1955 model 3107 chair, also known as "Chair number 7", of which more than five million were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the film "2001: A Space Odyssey" for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's work lies in its elegant and essential design, and it can now be found in collections such as the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish company Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, making each piece in close cooperation with internationally renowned designers and architects. Its collection includes the Egg Chair and Swan chair, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair and the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as tables and armchairs designed by Danish designers Piet Hein and Poul Kjaerholm.

Estim. 3,500 - 4,000 EUR

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 - 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. Swan chair, model 3320. Reddish brown leather, four-legged aluminum swivel legs, with return mechanism. Manufactured and labeled by Fritz Hansen, 2006. Red label. Shows signs of use and light scratches typical of the passage of time. Measurements: 77 x 75 x 65 cm. The Swan chair was designed in 1958 by Arne Jacobsen for the Radisson SAS Royal hotel in Copenhagen, and was edited by the Danish firm Fritz Hansen. It soon became a symbol of modern design. Among the rest of Arne Jacobsen's designs for the SAS Royal are the "Egg Chair", "Swan Chair", "Swan Sofa", "Series 3300" and "Drop Chair", furniture with which Jacobsen has written the history of Danish design around the world. Architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied for four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction and then entered the Faculty of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Among his most outstanding architectural works are St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in the same city, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the "Ant" chair (1951) and the "Swan" and "Egg" chairs designed for the SAS Hotel. He is also known for his 1955 model 3107 chair, also called "Chair number 7", of which more than five million copies were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's work lies in its elegant and essential design, and today we can find them in collections such as those of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London or the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish firm Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, making each piece in close cooperation with designers and architects of international prestige. Its collection includes the Egg Chair and Swan chair, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair and the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as tables and armchairs designed by Danish designers Piet Hein and Poul Kjaerholm.

Estim. 2,500 - 3,000 EUR

CHARLES EAMES (USA, 1907 – 1978) AND RAY EAMES (USA, 1912 – 1988) for VITRA. A high-back office armchair, model EA-119. Height adjustable and with tilt function. Original black leather upholstery, backside with black hopsak, armrests and five-star base in clome-plated aluminium, with castors. Designed in 1958. Slight traces of wear. Measurements: 102/115 x 58 x 58 cm; 43/56 cm. (seat height). Charles and Ray Eames, a married couple and artistic couple, worked in the fields of industrial and graphic design, fine art and film, and are responsible for numerous designs that have become classics of the 20th century. Charles Eames studied architecture for two years at the University of Washington, then began his career working in a studio on residential housing projects. In 1938 he moved to Cranbrook, Michigan, to continue studying architecture and design at the city's Academy of Art. He would eventually teach there, heading the industrial design department. Together with Eero Saarinen, the son of his teacher Eliel Saarinen, he designed the trophy for the Organic Design Award, given by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In 1941, after divorcing his first wife, he married his colleague at Cranbrook, Ray Kaiser. Together they settled in Los Angeles, where they would remain for the rest of their lives. In the late 1940s, Ray and Charles designed their home together, known as the "Eames House," now considered a masterpiece of modern architecture. In the 1950s the couple continued to work in architecture and furniture design, pioneering the use of new techniques and materials such as fiberglass and plastic resin in the manufacture of chairs. They are currently represented in the Design Museum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others.

Estim. 2,400 - 2,600 EUR

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 – 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. Set of six "Series 7" armchairs, model 3107. Upholstered again in cognac-colored analine leather, chromed steel tube frame. Molded plywood shell and chrome-plated steel tube frame. Produced by Fritz Hansen. Freshly reupholstered by a professional furniture upholsterer. Has small signs of wear. Measurements: 76 cm. height; 46.5 cm (seat height). Aniline leather is made from untanned hides. The skin has a completely natural bare surface on which all natural markings are visible. This helps highlight the skin's character. The leather is full grain, which means that the natural surface structure is preserved. Aniline leather changes over time from use and exposure to light and quickly acquires a natural patina. The 3207 chair is the evolution of the FH 3107 but with armrests. Model 3107, designed in 1955 by Arne Jacobsen and belonging to the Series 7, is by far the best-selling chair in the history of the Fritz Hansen firm, and perhaps also in the history of furniture. The molded seat is an evolution of that of the Ant Chair, an earlier design by the same creator, and its laminate structure represents the culmination of this construction technique. In fact, the visionary Jacobsen fully exploited the possibilities of laminate to reach perfection in an iconic form. Architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction, then entering the Faculty of Architecture of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Among his most notable architectural works are St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in the same city, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the “Ant” chair (1951) and the “Swan” and “Egg” chairs designed for the SAS hotel. He is also known for his model 3107 chair from 1955, also called “Chair number 7”, of which more than five million copies were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in the iconic portrait of Lewis Morley. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey” for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's works is found in his elegant and essential design, and we can currently find them in collections such as those of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London or the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish firm Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, creating each piece in close cooperation with internationally renowned designers and architects. Among its collection stands out: the EggChair armchair and the Swan armchair, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair or the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as the tables and armchairs designed by the Danes PietHein and PoulKjaerholm.

Estim. 3,800 - 4,500 EUR

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 - 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. "Swan Chair. Designed 1957-1958 as part of the overall interior design of the Royal Hotel in Copenhagen. Armchair upholstered in dark brown leather, swivel central column with square aluminium base. Made by Fritz Hansen in 2018, 'Black Label'. With label. Light marks of use. Measurements: 80/40 cm (height). The Swan chair was designed in 1958 by Arne Jacobsen for the Radisson SAS Royal hotel in Copenhagen, and was edited by the Danish firm Fritz Hansen. It soon became a symbol of modern design. Among Arne Jacobsen's other designs for the SAS Royal are the "Egg Chair", "Swan Chair", "Swan Sofa", "Series 3300" and "Drop Chair", furniture with which Jacobsen has written the history of Danish design all over the world. An architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied for four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction and then entered the Faculty of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. His architectural highlights include St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in Copenhagen, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the "Ant" chair (1951) and the "Swan" and "Egg" chairs designed for the SAS Hotel. He is also known for his 1955 model 3107 chair, also known as "Chair number 7", of which more than five million were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the film "2001: A Space Odyssey" for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's work lies in its elegant and essential design, and it can now be found in collections such as the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish company Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, making each piece in close cooperation with internationally renowned designers and architects. Its collection includes the Egg Chair and Swan chair, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair and the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as tables and armchairs designed by Danish designers Piet Hein and Poul Kjaerholm.

Estim. 3,200 - 3,500 EUR

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 - 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. Set of six "Syveren" chairs, model 3207, design 1955. With moulded plywood shell, chrome-plated tubular steel frame. Re-upholstered in black aniline leather on the shell and armrests. Looks professionally reupholstered. Measurements: 76/44.5 cm (height). The aniline leather is made from raw hides. The leather has a completely natural bare surface, where all natural markings are visible. This helps to bring out the character of the leather. The leather is full grain, which means that the natural surface structure is preserved. The aniline leather changes over time with use and exposure to light and quickly acquires a natural patina. The Syveren 3107 chair, designed in 1955 by Arne Jacobsen and belonging to Series 7, is by far the best-selling chair in the history of the Fritz Hansen company, and perhaps also in the history of furniture. The moulded seat is an evolution of the Ant Chair, an earlier design by the same creator, and its laminated structure represents the culmination of this construction technique. In fact, the visionary Jacobsen exploited the possibilities of laminate to the full to achieve the perfection of an iconic form. An architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied for four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction and then entered the Faculty of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. His architectural highlights include St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in Copenhagen, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the "Ant" chair (1951) and the "Swan" and "Egg" chairs designed for the SAS Hotel. He is also known for his 1955 model 3107 chair, also known as "Chair number 7", of which more than five million were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the film "2001: A Space Odyssey" for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's work lies in its elegant and essential design, and it can now be found in collections such as the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish firm Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, making each piece in close cooperation with internationally renowned designers and architects. Its collection includes the EggChair and Swan armchairs, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair and the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as tables and armchairs designed by Danish designers PietHein and Poul Kjaerholm.

Estim. 5,000 - 5,500 EUR