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World Art

In the top ten of bids, the ethnic arts by no means drag their heels. These treasures of africa, america and oceania sold at auction have fascinated collectors from André Breton to Pablo Picasso and from Pierre Vérité to Jacques Kerchache.
In 2000, Kerchache was largely responsible for introducing works by these peoples considered "without writing or history" to the Louvre, foreshadowing the opening of the musée du Quai Branly in Paris.
"Masterpieces the world over are born free and equal," to quote the man who loved these magical objects from all over the globe: from Africa (Ivory Coast, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Angola, Burkina-Faso, Gabon, Madagascar, etc.), oceania (Papua New Guinea, the Marquesas Islands, the Cook Islands, the Solomon Islands, New Zealand, Polynesia, etc.), the americas (the Tainos of the caribbean islands, the Inuits from the gulf of Alaska) and insulindia (Borneo, Indonesia). While they acquired the rank of art works late on in their history, since 2000, the ethnic arts have certainly been adding fuel to the (sacred) fire in online auctions, with dogon masks, fang statues, kota mbulu-ngulu reliquary figures, maoris pendants and eskimo sculptures.

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Agra carpet (cotton warp and weft, wool pile) Northeast India, circa 1880 Height 560; Width 360 cm This important rug (in terms of size) is enhanced by an elegant polychrome stylized floral design on a black background. The wide red main border with a garland of stylized polychrome flowers is framed by eight blue and ivory counter-borders. Agra is an Indian imperial city in Utar Pradesh, famous for its white marble mausoleum, the Taj Mahal, and for its carpets. As early as 1549, artists came to India (from Tabriz and Herat) to join the art academy of Emperor Humayun (1508-1556). But it was his art-loving successor, Akbar the Great (1556-1605), who presided over the founding of factories in India with the help of Persian weavers who particularly stimulated local production. Mughal artists borrowed heavily from the Persian Islamic repertoire. In fact, the aesthetics of Indian fabrics and carpets are sometimes so close to those of their Safavid prototypes that only a discerning eye can tell them apart. The Safavids thus succeeded in transforming artisanal, nomadic carpet production into a manufacturing industry. At the time, however, carpets were a luxury item reserved for the palaces of the court. The most flourishing period came in the 17th century with production in Lahore and Agra. But most Indian production in the 19th and 20th centuries is attributed to the Agra factories, which are still active today. Agra even gave its name to Mughal production and, more specifically, to the very large carpets destined for the palaces of the local aristocracy and often exported to the United States and Europe. Although influenced by Persia, Indian carpets retain their own identity through the reality and detail of their designs: medallions and floral decorations are omnipresent, but symmetry is less rigorous. Birds, animals and trees are represented alongside flowers and foliage. The refined color palette is particularly attractive. Persian motifs include the "mustofi" (fleurons and palms), the "ci" or "tchi" (ribbon-shaped cloud) and the "botech" (stylized pear). Bibliographical reference : SABAHI, T - Splendeurs des tapis d'Orient - Ed Atlas, Paris - 1987 - p 412-413 and 439 Good condition

Estim. 10,000 - 12,000 EUR

Agra carpet (cotton warp and weft, wool pile) Northeast India, circa 1850-1880 475 x 400 cm This beautiful rug is decorated with the Herati motif. This pattern consists of a lozenge of curved stems, enclosing a rosette and surmounted by a palmette at each apex, repeated ad infinitum, with four falciform leaves next to each other. This design adorned Herat carpets (to which it owes its name). It is framed by a wide red main border with a garland of stylized polychrome flowers and eight blue and ivory counter-borders. Agra is an Indian imperial city in Utar Pradesh, famous for its white marble mausoleum, the Taj Mahal, and for its carpets. As early as 1549, artists came to India (from Tabriz and Herat) to join the art academy of Emperor Humayun (1508-1556). But it was his art-loving successor, Akbar the Great (1556-1605), who presided over the founding of factories in India with the help of Persian weavers who particularly stimulated local production. Mughal artists borrowed heavily from the Persian Islamic repertoire. In fact, the aesthetics of Indian fabrics and carpets are sometimes so close to those of their Safavid prototypes that only a discerning eye can tell them apart. The Safavids thus succeeded in transforming artisanal, nomadic carpet production into a manufacturing industry. At the time, however, carpets were a luxury item reserved for the palaces of the court. The most flourishing period came in the 17th century with production in Lahore and Agra. But most Indian production in the 19th and 20th centuries is attributed to the Agra factories, which are still active today. Agra even gave its name to Mughal production and, more specifically, to the very large carpets destined for the palaces of the local aristocracy and often exported to the USA and Europe. Although influenced by Persia, Indian carpets retain their own identity through the reality and detail of their designs: medallions and floral decorations are omnipresent, but symmetry is less rigorous. Birds, animals and trees are represented alongside flowers and foliage. The refined color palette is particularly attractive. Persian motifs include the "mustofi" (florets and palms), the "ci" or "tchi" (ribbon-shaped cloud) and the "boteh" (stylized pear). Wear Bibliographical reference: SABAHI, T - Splendeurs des tapis d'Orient - Ed Atlas, Paris - 1987 - p 412-413 and 439

Estim. 5,000 - 7,000 EUR