Seating

In this age of the "couch generation", you just have to take a front seat in an auction to get yourself wing chairs, sofas, benches, armchairs, dining chairs and stools.
"There are as many forms of seating as conversation," said Philippe Jullian in 1961, in his erudite and amusing little encyclopaedia on "styles".
Loveseats for tête-à-tête conversations, low chairs for chatting by the fire and sofas for chatting online are all objects you can buy in seating auctions …unless you're looking for a méridienne for a quiet rest, a dos-à-dos (a 19th century double seat placing people back to back) or that psychoanalysis speciality, the couch.
While seating, according to Philippe Jullian, "became lower for romantic reasons and wider to accommodate crinolines" during the second empire, the 20th century has its own iconic models, including Harry Bertoia's side chair, Charlotte Perriand's chaise longue and Charles Eames' plastic armchair.
Design addicts can sit pretty after an online seating auction if they garner a sofa by Jean Royère, a chair by Philippe Starck or an armchair by the Bouroullec brothers.

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JORGEN KASTHOLM (Denmark, 1931 - 2007) and PREBEN FABRICIUS (Denmark, 1931 - 1984) for LANGE PRODUCTION. Chaise longue "Grasshopper", Model FK-87, design 1967. Chrome-plated steel, canvas fabric, loose cushions and neck cushion upholstered in cognac aniline leather. Laced armrests in harness leather. Lange Production Editor. Brand new, Delivered in original packaging. With photos of the model. Measurements: 81 x 150 cm. This design was created by designers Preben Fabricius and Jørgen Kastholm, consisting of a lightweight chromed steel structure, whose shape resembles a grasshopper, and a stretched fabric that serves as a support for the cushion that is loose on it, plus a cognac-colored leather headrest. Its sober, light and elegant design, with simple lines, results in a timeless product that at the same time captures the genuine spirit of the era. It is a piece of furniture that brings together design, quality materials and functionality in a single object. Danish architect and designer Jørgen Kastholm began his training as a blacksmith, but soon left to pursue furniture design. He attended the Copenhagen School of Interior Design, where he was taught by Finn Juhl. There he also met cabinetmaker Preben Fabricius, who would later become his partner. The two shared a common vision of furniture design, based on minimalism and quality and inspired by the creations of Charles Eames and Mies van der Rohe. Their quest was to achieve an ideal that, by its simplicity, would be timeless. In 1961 they set up a studio together in Gentofte, and four years later they presented their first designs at the Federicia furniture fair, where they attracted the attention of the German furniture manufacturer Alfred Kill. The latter offered them a lucrative contract that allowed them to work freely, so Kastholm and Fabricius moved to Stuttgart with their first designs to start production in Kill's factory. Shortly thereafter, they made the international breakthrough at the 1966 Cologne trade fair, where they exhibited a complete series of home and office furniture, developed from ten of their original designs. Their minimalist creations, at once attractive and comfortable, were generally steel and leather furniture. The two creators worked together between 1961 and 1968, a seven-year period in which they produced numerous designs now considered classics, such as the Tulip Chair FK 6725, the Grasshopper FK 87 or the Scimitar. Also during this period, their furniture was part of important international exhibitions, held in such prominent centers as the MOMA in New York (1967) or the Musée d'Art Moderne in Paris (1967). Today, designs by Kastholm and Fabricius can be seen at the MACBA in Barcelona, the MOMA in New York, the Musée d'Art Moderne in Paris, the Ringling Museum in Florida, the Art Museum of Brasilia, the Design Center in Stuttgart, the Haus Industriform in Essen, the Neue Sammlung in Munich, the Staatsgemäldesammlung Bayer in Munich, the Kunstindustrimuseum in Berlin, the Kunststofmuseum in Düsseldorf, the World Import Mart Museum and the History + Folkways Museum in Japan and the Museum für Angewandte Kunstgeschichte in Cologne.

Estim. 7,000 - 8,000 EUR

LUDWIG MIES VAN DER ROHE (Germany, 1886 - USA, 1969) for KNOLL. Barcelona" lounger, design 1929 (Barcelona Universal Exposition). Polished stainless steel and black leather upholstery. Signed and with label. Includes matching neck pillow. Model reproduced and reviewed in "Charlotte & Peter Fiell. 1000 Chairs", p. 133. Measurements: 41 x 195 x 95 cm. The Barcelona sofa bed is a classic work of 20th century industrial design. Mies van der Rohe created it, together with the chair and the matching side table, for the German pavilion at the 1929 Barcelona International Exhibition, a building which was itself a milestone in the architecture of the last century. Like the chairs, the ottoman was made with a polished stainless steel frame and leather upholstery. Rohe based his creation, in his personal line of modern classicism, on furniture used by Roman magistrates in antiquity. Today, the Barcelona chair, the ottoman and the matching side table are still produced by Knoll, the company that bought the licence from the architect in 1953. Modern models are produced in two different steel configurations, and in various types of leather in different colours. Today, examples of the Barcelona chair can be found in important collections around the world, such as the MoMA in New York. An architect and industrial designer, Mies van der Rohe trained with Bruno Paul and Peter Behrens, and opened his own studio in Berlin in 1912. Between 1930 and 1933 he directed the Bauhaus in Dessau, although the political situation in Germany forced him to emigrate to the United States shortly afterwards. There he continued his brilliant career, while at the same time teaching at the Illinois Technology Institute in Chicago. During his career he designed emblematic buildings, mainly in Germany and the United States, particularly his skyscrapers in New York and Chicago, the German Pavilion for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition, and the NeueNationalgalerie in Berlin.

Estim. 9,000 - 10,000 EUR

EERO AARNIO (Helsinki, Finland, 1932) for Asko. Pair of "Pastille" chairs, 1960s. White polyester. They show marks of use. Measurements: 50 x 90 x 90 cm; 30 cm (seat height). The Pastille Chair by Eero Aarnio adopts in our case a timeless white color, thus becoming a true vintage jewel. This iconic chair, designed by the renowned Finnish designer, features a distinctive round shape inspired by the Space Age style, the name given to the period when the space race was launched, starting in 1957 with the launch of Sputnik. This fever to conquer space also reached design, and during the sixties and seventies a decoration model was developed based on an idyllic vision of the future, and on everything to do with spaceships, new technologies and innovative materials. This design won him the American Industrial Design Award. Eero Aarnio was, and still is, one of the pioneers in the use of fiberglass in the design industry. It is a material that allows you to freely create any shape and use the colors you want, resulting in objects that oscillate between function and fun, but always fascinating. Aarnio studied at the Helsinki University of Art and Design (now Aalto University) between 1954 and 1957. In 1962 he set up his own studio, starting his career as an interior and furniture designer, as well as working as a photographer. His first designs had a traditional aesthetic, using local materials such as wicker. However, in the sixties he began his studies with fiberglass, exploring the formal possibilities of this material. In 1962 he created the "Mushroom" stools, and the following year the "Ball Chair", an icon of the pop era with which he won the prestigious ADI award in 1968. His daring and iconoclastic solutions would be embodied in 1968 in the novel "Bubble Chair", a chair that hangs from the ceiling. This innovative design went beyond pop, approaching "spatial" forms and concepts, and using such a novel material as Plexiglas. Color, on the other hand, began to be a prominent element in his production: red, orange or green tones were an indissoluble part of the provocative scenario that constitutes each of his works. At the end of the sixties he would create other chairs, with a clear organic influence, such as the "Pastil Chair", from 1967, a fiberglass chair that can also be used in water, and which won him the American Industrial Design Award. In 1973, taking advantage of the appeal of his designs and especially their colors, he created the "Pony Chair", an exclusive creation for children. Aarnio's production stopped until the 1990s, when he created designs such as the "Formula Chair" (1998) or the "Focus 2" (2002), made of fiberglass. Today, Aarnio's designs are included in the permanent collections of the most prestigious museums, including the Victoria & Albert in London, the MoMA in New York and the Vitra Museum in Weil am Rhein.

Estim. 3,000 - 3,200 EUR

LE CORBUSIER (Switzerland, 1887 - France, 1965) and CHARLOTTE PERRIAND (France, 1903 - 1999) for CASSINA. LC6 table. Original design from 1928. Edition of the 1980s. Tubular steel base with black finish. Glass top. It shows signs of use, wear and tear and a chipped corner. Measurements: 72 x 210 x 100 cm. The interest of the LC6 table lies in its refined steel and glass structure. On the one hand, the black chromed steel base gives stability and a robust appearance to the furniture; on the other hand, the rectangular glass tabletop, with its sharp edges, provides lightness and weightlessness. Designed in 1928 by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand, the base is inspired by the oval profiles used in aeronautical design to maintain the distance between the wings of biplanes. The result of their masterful design work is this multifunctional table, which can be used both in the office and at home. Architectural theorist, architect, designer and painter Swiss, naturalized French, Le Corbusier is considered one of the clearest exponents of the Modern Movement in architecture, and one of the most influential architects of the twentieth century. He developed a new architecture based on five points that would be key to the development of this discipline from then on: the free plan, the garden-terrace, the "pilotis", the longitudinal window and the free facade. Among his most outstanding architectural projects are the Swiss Pavilion of the Cité Universitaire de Paris, the Unité d'Habitation in Marseille and the chapel of Notre Dame du Aut. in Ronchamp. As a furniture designer, Le Corbusier made his first creations with Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand, obtaining the definitive impulse in the Paris Decorative Arts Exhibition of 1925. Already his first chairs and armchairs were conceived in terms of comfort, and based on anthropometric studies that guarantee a total adaptability to the body. The first design that Le Corbusier created, together with Jeanneret and Perriand, was the LC1 chair, presented in 1928 and characterized by a height-adjustable backrest that allowed the user to choose the most comfortable posture. He would continue to work along these lines, and at the 1929 Salon d'Automne du Design he presented his LC4 chaise longue, a purist and radical design that has become a classic today. Equally well known are his LC2, LC3 and LC5 designs, one-, two- and three-seater sofas designed to revolutionize the mass production of modern furniture. We must also highlight the design of stools and dining chairs, such as the LC7, presented at the 1929 Salon d'Automne or the LC8. Le Corbusier, Jeanneret and Perriand sought to design furniture for all rooms of the house, and so they created pieces like the LC9, a stool for the bathroom, very simple, with fabric seat. Le Corbusier also created other types of furniture, such as tables and shelves. His designs are currently edited by the Italian company Cassina, and are present in important collections such as the MoMA in New York or the Victoria & Albert in London. It presents marks of use, wear, and a chip in one corner.

Estim. 2,500 - 3,000 EUR

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 - 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. "Egg Chair". Designed in 1958-59 as part of the overall interior design of the Royal Copenhagen Hotel. Originally upholstered in black "Classic" leather, swivel aluminium base. With tilt function. Made in Fritz Hansen 'Red Label' 2008, with label, model 3316. With minor signs of wear. Literature: C Thau / K. Vindum 'Arne Jacobsen' 1998 Included mentioned p. 144, 432 reproduced p. 433, 438-439, 467, 471-472. Measurements: 104 x 87 x 80 cm. 40 cm. (seat height). The Egg chair was designed in 1958 by Arne Jacobsen for the Radisson SAS Royal hotel in Copenhagen and was published by the Danish firm Fritz Hansen. It soon became a symbol of modern design, starring in some of the scenes of the futuristic film "2001: A Space Odyssey". Among the rest of Arne Jacobsen's designs for SAS Royal are the "Egg Chair", "Swan Chair", "Swan Sofa", "Series 3300" and "Drop Chair", furniture with which Jacobsen has written the history of Danish design all over the world. The Danish architect was one of the pioneers of the time in using new methods in furniture design, the Egg Armchair being a clear example of this. The iconic sofa consists of a one-piece, concave moulded polyurethane shell with fibreglass reinforcement, which has been covered with an elegant upholstery. The shell has an adjustable tilt mechanism, which can be adjusted to the weight of the individual user. The tilt mechanism is made of steel, while the adjustment handle is made of polished stainless steel. The result, a distinguished, pointed and unique timeless design that will stand the test of time. Architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied for four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction, then entered the Faculty of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. His architectural highlights include St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in Copenhagen, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the "Ant" chair (1951) and the "Swan" and "Egg" chairs designed for the SAS Hotel. He is also known for his 1955 model 3107 chair, also known as "Chair number 7", of which more than five million were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the film "2001: A Space Odyssey" for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's work lies in its elegant and essential design, and it can now be found in collections such as the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish firm Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, making each piece in close cooperation with internationally renowned designers and architects. Its collection includes the Egg Chair and Swan chair, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair and the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as tables and armchairs designed by Danish designers Piet Hein and Poul Kjaerholm.

Estim. 6,000 - 7,000 EUR

JOHANNES FOERSOM (Denmark, 1947) & PETER HJORT-LORENZEN (Denmark, 1943) for ERIK JØRGENSEN. Sofa "Love Seat" EJ800 Rotor, 1980s. Chrome-plated steel tubes. Black leather upholstery on the upper part and resistant fabric on the rest of the sofa. Measurements: 82 x 153 x 90 cm; 40 cm (height from seat to floor). The EJ800 sofa, designed by Foersom & Hiort-Lorenzen, is a testament to timeless elegance and exceptional comfort. It is distinguished by its minimalist design and clean lines that blend harmoniously into various spaces. In addition, its structure allows you to easily change the backrest, thus achieving an original sofa, adapting to your needs. Production was limited to a small number of units, mainly for Bang & Olufsen. With its robust structure and high-quality upholstery, the EJ800 sofa is not only an aesthetically appealing piece of design, but also a luxurious experience for those who enjoy it. The arrangement of the modules makes it possible to adapt this sofa to individual needs and preferences. The structure is very robust and sturdy, made of chrome-plated steel tubing. The black leather upholstery in the upper part and in durable fabric in the rest of the sofa is an undeniable symbol of Danish elegance and sophistication, which contrasts with the playful shape of the seat. Johannes Foersom and Peter Hiort-Lorenzen (MDD) are two of the most recognized and successful furniture designers in Scandinavian design. The aim of their creations is to endow them with lasting value, stimulating healthy development for people and their surroundings. The couple strives for the highest quality in cooperation, process and product, and believes that knowledge and innovation are fundamental to the successful development of the firm. The exceptional use of flexibility makes the furniture appear as small architectural marvels. Throughout their careers, both designers have received numerous awards, including: The Danish State Art's Fund (190,1972 and 1977), Kröyer's Memorial Award (1974, 1975), Nationalbanken's Jubilee Fund (1980), the Annual Award of the Danish Furniture manufacturers (1985), Design Zentrum Nordrhein Westfalen's Prize for high design quality (1992, 1994, 1995, 1999), the Forsnäs Prize (1994), Bo Bedre's Design Award (1995, 1996, 1997), the Best of Neocon (1995)); Bruno Mathsson Award (1998), the Excellet Swedish From the Table Atlas (2000) and the Finn Juhl Prize (2005).

Estim. 2,600 - 2,800 EUR

LUDWIG MIES VAN DER ROHE (Germany, 1886 - USA, 1969) for KNOLL. Armchair "Barcelona". Chrome-plated steel frame, loose comfort cushions upholstered in black leather sewn with buttons. Lower upholstery with black leather straps. With certificate and Knoll stamp. Literature: C. & P. Fiell. 1000 chairs. Mentioned and photographed on p. 172. Apparently unused. With original packaging. Brand new. Measurements: 80 x 75 x 70 cm. Packaging dimensions: 84 x 89 x 84 cm. The Barcelona chair (model MR90) is a classic of 20th century industrial design. Mies van der Rohe created it, together with the ottoman and the matching side table, for the German pavilion at the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition, a building which was also a landmark in the architecture of the last century. The chairs were so admired that they were used as thrones for the King and Queen of Spain when they visited the Barcelona pavilion. They were seats with a structure made entirely of polished stainless steel, with the seat and backrest entirely covered in pigskin upholstery. Later, in 1950, some adjustments were made to the design for mass production. Van der Rohe based his creation, in his personal brand of modern classicism, on the "sella curulis", a type of seat used by Roman magistrates in antiquity. On the other hand, the visible joining of the frame and seat cushions as separate components, and the combined use of traditional and modern materials, appropriately matched to their function, eloquently reveal Mies' personal vision of international style. Today, both the Barcelona chair and the matching ottoman and side table are still produced by Knoll, the firm that bought the licence from the architect in 1953. The modern models are produced in two different steel configurations, and in various types of leather in different colours. Examples of the Barcelona chair can be found in important collections around the world, such as the MoMA in New York. An architect and industrial designer, Mies van der Rohe trained with Bruno Paul and Peter Behrens, and opened his own studio in Berlin in 1912. Between 1930 and 1933 he directed the Bauhaus in Dessau, although the political situation in Germany forced him to emigrate to the United States shortly afterwards. There he continued his brilliant career, while at the same time teaching at the Illinois Technology Institute in Chicago. During his career he designed emblematic buildings, mainly in Germany and the United States, particularly his skyscrapers in New York and Chicago, the German Pavilion for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition, and the NeueNationalgalerie in Berlin.

Estim. 6,000 - 7,000 EUR

ROGER TALLON (Paris, 1929-2011). Floor lamp "Erco". 2 points of light, one of them with Osram Concentra bulb. Measurements: 142 cm (height) x 28 cm (base diameter). The Erco floor lamp is composed of an adjustable top piece that resembles a microphone and produces a diffused light through the slits. In this case it is mounted on a vertical pole with a circular flat foot. Roger Tallon is considered the father of French industrial design. In fact, his extensive career includes major railway projects such as the TGV and the Eurostar. Trained in engineering from 1944 to 1950, he later joined Caterpillar France and Dupont de Nemours. Years later, he joined Technès, the technical studies and aesthetics office founded in 1949 by Jacques Viénot, one of the pioneers of industrial aesthetics, and Jean Parthenay. A teacher since 1957 at the Ecole des Arts Appliquées in Paris, he organized the first design course in France. In 1963 he created the design department of the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. Among his main projects: motorcycle for the Derny brand, domestic robots for Peugeot or a slide projector for Kodak. He designed the helical staircase for MoMA in New York, the TS Folding Stool and the 3T dinnerware set. Throughout his career he has received important awards, including the "iF Industry Forum Design Auszeichnung" prize in 1977, the grand prize for national industrial creation awarded by the Ministry of Culture in 1985 and the insignia of Commander of Arts and Letters received from the President of the SNCF in 1992.

Estim. 800 - 900 EUR

VERNER PANTON (Denmark, 1926 - 1998) for FRITZ HANSEN. Chaiselong "Relaxer Chair K". Designed in 1973. Black leather capitonné. Produced by Fritz Hansen. It shows signs of use. Measurements: 102 x 137 x 60 cm. The Relaxer Chair K is a lounger designed for the total comfort of the user. Its high backrest and ergonomic shape adapt perfectly to the body of each user. Verner Panton was famous for his exuberant forms and this chair is a wonderful example. Considered one of the most influential personalities of late 20th century furniture design, Verner Panton created a variety of innovative and futuristic designs during his career, especially constructed in plastic and brightly colored. Most of his best-known designs are still in production. Verner attended the Odense Technical School and then studied architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, graduating in 1951. In the early years of his career, between 1950 and 1942, he worked in the architectural office of Arne Jacobsen. In 1955 he opened his own architecture and design studio, becoming famous with his furniture based on geometric shapes, manufactured by the company Plus-linje. In the late 1950s his chair designs, with no legs and no discernible back, became increasingly unconventional. In the 1960s Panton began his collaboration with the firm Vitra, which has been very close ever since, culminating in 2000 with the Panton retrospective exhibition held at the Vitra Design Museum. He is currently represented at the DesignMuseum in London and the MoMA in New York, among many others.

Estim. 3,000 - 3,200 EUR

ARNE JACOBSEN (Denmark, 1902 - 1971) for FRITZ HANSEN. Swan chair, model 3320. Reddish brown leather, four-legged aluminum swivel legs, with return mechanism. Made and labeled by Fritz Hansen, 2006. Red label. Shows signs of use and scratches typical of the passage of time. Measurements: 77 x 75 x 65 cm. The Swan chair was designed in 1958 by Arne Jacobsen for the Radisson SAS Royal hotel in Copenhagen, and was edited by the Danish firm Fritz Hansen. It soon became a symbol of modern design. Among the rest of Arne Jacobsen's designs for the SAS Royal are the "Egg Chair", "Swan Chair", "Swan Sofa", "Series 3300" and "Drop Chair", furniture with which Jacobsen has written the history of Danish design around the world. Architect and designer, Arne Jacobsen studied for four years at the Copenhagen School of Construction and then entered the Faculty of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Among his most outstanding architectural works are St. Catherine's College in Oxford, the SAS Hotel in Copenhagen, the headquarters of the National Bank of Denmark in the same city, and the Royal Danish Embassy in London. As a designer, he has created furniture that has become classics, including the "Ant" chair (1951) and the "Swan" and "Egg" chairs designed for the SAS Hotel. He is also known for his 1955 model 3107 chair, also called "Chair number 7", of which more than five million copies were sold, starring alongside Christine Keeler in Lewis Morley's iconic portrait. His other contribution to popular culture in the media is his designer cutlery, with spoons for both hands, which were chosen for the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" for their futuristic look. The key to the success of Jacobsen's work lies in its elegant and essential design, and today we can find them in collections such as those of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London or the MoMA in New York, among many others. The Danish firm Fritz Hansen, founded in 1872, manufactures original, unique, functional and innovative contemporary design furniture. It manufactures its products in its facilities in the north of Copenhagen, making each piece in close cooperation with designers and architects of international prestige. Its collection includes the Egg Chair and Swan chair, the Series 7 chair, the Ant chair and the Oxford chair by designer Arne Jacobsen, as well as tables and armchairs designed by Danish designers Piet Hein and Poul Kjaerholm.

Estim. 2,500 - 3,000 EUR

LUDWIG MIES VAN DER ROHE (Germany, 1886 - USA, 1969) for KNOLL. Armchair "Barcelona". Chrome-plated steel frame, loose comfort cushions upholstered in black leather sewn with buttons. Lower upholstery with black leather straps. With certificate and Knoll stamp. Literature: C. & P. Fiell. 1000 chairs. Mentioned and photographed on p. 172. Apparently unused. With original packaging. Brand new. Measurements: 80 x 75 x 70 cm. Packaging dimensions: 84 x 89 x 84 cm. The Barcelona chair (model MR90) is a classic of 20th century industrial design. Mies van der Rohe created it, together with the ottoman and the matching side table, for the German pavilion at the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition, a building which was also a landmark in the architecture of the last century. The chairs were so admired that they were used as thrones for the King and Queen of Spain when they visited the Barcelona pavilion. They were seats with a structure made entirely of polished stainless steel, with the seat and backrest entirely covered in pigskin upholstery. Later, in 1950, some adjustments were made to the design for mass production. Van der Rohe based his creation, in his personal brand of modern classicism, on the "sella curulis", a type of seat used by Roman magistrates in antiquity. On the other hand, the visible joining of the frame and seat cushions as separate components, and the combined use of traditional and modern materials, appropriately matched to their function, eloquently reveal Mies' personal vision of international style. Today, both the Barcelona chair and the matching ottoman and side table are still produced by Knoll, the firm that bought the licence from the architect in 1953. The modern models are produced in two different steel configurations, and in various types of leather in different colours. Examples of the Barcelona chair can be found in important collections around the world, such as the MoMA in New York. An architect and industrial designer, Mies van der Rohe trained with Bruno Paul and Peter Behrens, and opened his own studio in Berlin in 1912. Between 1930 and 1933 he directed the Bauhaus in Dessau, although the political situation in Germany forced him to emigrate to the United States shortly afterwards. There he continued his brilliant career, while at the same time teaching at the Illinois Technology Institute in Chicago. During his career he designed emblematic buildings, mainly in Germany and the United States, particularly his skyscrapers in New York and Chicago, the German Pavilion for the 1929 Barcelona International Exposition, and the NeueNationalgalerie in Berlin.

Estim. 6,000 - 7,000 EUR

OLE WANSCHER (Denmark, 1903-1985) for CADO. 3-seater sofa. Teak frame. Brown leather upholstery. Produced in Cado, stamped here. With marks of use. Measurements: 80 x 181 x 75 cm. Seat height 49 cm. One of the best creations of the Danish master Ole Wanscher, the Senator model was inspired by British and French furniture of the 19th century. It features an open-format teak wood structure, light and solid, typical of Danish furniture from the second half of the 20th century. Considered an integral part of the central aesthetic and functionality of Danish design, Ole Wanscher studied with Kaare Klint at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. He subsequently worked in Klint's design studio before becoming a freelance furniture designer. In 1958, the Danish newspaper Politiken wrote: "Having a Wanscher chair is an adventure every day, and it will continue to be so, even if hundreds of years go by, for this is how long it lasts." Today, his modern classics are still revered for their detailing and deep respect for materials. While traveling in Egypt and Europe, Wanscher studied furniture design, finding inspiration in diverse visual expressions that he incorporated into his own unique design aesthetic. He saw furniture design as a branch of architecture and emphasized slender dimensions and sturdy forms, a pursuit exemplified in many of his works, particularly the Colonial Chair and Colonial Sofa. Wanscher created his best-known designs primarily between the late 1940s and early 1960s, in the postwar era, when the philosophy of "design for all" emerged. In Denmark, some of the biggest names in design created functional and affordable furniture for the Danes and the small spaces in which they lived. Wanscher took a keen interest in industrially produced but high quality furniture, designing several successful pieces. Wanscher's design earned him numerous accolades, including the Copenhagen Carpenters' Guild Annual Award and the gold medal at the Milan Triennale in 1960, honors that underscored Wanscher's esteemed reputation both in Denmark and internationally.

Estim. 1,800 - 2,000 EUR

OLE WANSCHER (Denmark, 1903-1985) for CADO. Pair of "Senator" armchairs. Teak wood frame. New upholstery with stone pattern. WithCADO stamp. With CADO stamp. Measurements: 79 x 68 x 70 cm. Seat height 45 cm. One of the best creations of the Danish master Ole Wanscher, the Senator model was inspired by the British and French furniture of the 19th century. It features an open-format teak wood structure, light and solid, typical of Danish furniture from the second half of the 20th century. Considered an integral part of the central aesthetic and functionality of Danish design, Ole Wanscher studied with Kaare Klint at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. He subsequently worked in Klint's design studio before becoming a freelance furniture designer. In 1958, the Danish newspaper Politiken wrote: "Having a Wanscher chair is an adventure every day, and it will continue to be so, even if hundreds of years go by, for this is how long it lasts." Today, his modern classics are still revered for their detailing and deep respect for materials. While traveling in Egypt and Europe, Wanscher studied furniture design, finding inspiration in diverse visual expressions that he incorporated into his own unique design aesthetic. He saw furniture design as a branch of architecture and emphasized slender dimensions and sturdy forms, a pursuit exemplified in many of his works, particularly the Colonial Chair and Colonial Sofa. Wanscher created his best-known designs primarily between the late 1940s and early 1960s, in the postwar era, when the philosophy of "design for all" emerged. In Denmark, some of the biggest names in design created functional and affordable furniture for the Danes and the small spaces in which they lived. Wanscher took a keen interest in industrially produced but high quality furniture, designing several successful pieces. Wanscher's design earned him numerous accolades, including the Copenhagen Carpenters' Guild Annual Award and the gold medal at the Milan Triennale in 1960, honors that underscored Wanscher's esteemed reputation both in Denmark and internationally.

Estim. 1,200 - 1,300 EUR