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1964 ALFA ROMEO GUILIA TZ Chassis AR 750071 Swiss circulation permit Temporary import into the European Union - Alfa Romeo certificate - Racing Car Show 1965 - Ex John Dolley In the early sixties, Alfa Romeo began work on a replacement for the sporty Guilietta. For this new project, a radical choice was made. A tubular chassis was developed specifically for this new car, a design delegated to Auto-Delta. Made from welded steel, it offered ideal weight distribution and weighed just 125 kg. Mechanically, the new Giulia is equipped with a 1570 cm3 engine, greatly revised for the occasion with aluminum block and cylinder head. It is fed by two Weber 40 twin-barrel carburetors, developing 112 hp in the civil version and 170 hp in competition. The bodywork was entrusted to Zagato who, on the strength of his work on the SZ Coda Tronca, entrusted the project to Ercole Spada. He proposed a line with exceptional aerodynamics. The result was one of the finest competition cars of its day. Although 100 examples were originally planned, Alfa Romeo produced a total of 112. The story of our example begins in November 1964, when Alfa Romeo GB LTD received a TZ chassis 750071. On November 11 of the same year, the car was sold to Ken Rudd Engineers, the brand's dealer in Worthing, Sussex. The car was then registered 3 LBP. In January 1965, the car was exhibited at the 6th Racing Car Show in London on stand 44 (owned by Halsales, the Alfa Romeo dealer in Penge). On March 19, 1965, the car was put up for sale by the Worthing dealer, the advert stating: less than 100 miles, as new, no competition use, on sale following a change of programme. In October 1969, the car reappeared, painted blue and offered for sale by a certain Peter Anthony S. He explained that he was the car's first owner. In 1970, the unsold car was repainted red to facilitate the transaction. On January 21 of the same year, the car was sold and registered in the name of Dr. Donald B. On May 16, 1970, the car came into the possession of Jon Dooley, a British enthusiast and touring car driver. On that day, the TZ was entered in a local event at Silverstone. Between 1970 and 1974, chassis 750071 was entered in some twenty events in Great Britain. After this date, the two Alfa Romeo TZs present in the UK at the time were acquired by Steve Forristal, a Texan dealer and great specialist in the brand, known for having raced a TZ2 in 1965. In 1984, when the first TZ Owner's Register was drawn up, chassis 071 was still in the hands of Steve Forristal. In October 1988, the car was acquired by Albrecht G. Guggisberg. He restored it before selling it to Gérald Bugnon in 1993. Soon after its acquisition, the car was prepared for participation in various VHC events. In 2000, the car was restored, this time by the CMG Prototypi workshops. Its original color was restored. Between 2001 and 2005, the car will be entered in a dozen VHC rallies with Gérald Bugnon as co-driver in his Team: il Biscione Corsa Romand. Between rallies, the car is serviced by the Calderoni workshops. In 2006, the car won the Rallye Historique du Var in its class. At its wheel was Romain Dumas, who would go on to become a two-time winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans. After this date, chassis 071 will be raced less and less. In 2011, the decision is taken to restore TZ to its original state. The original gearbox is reinstalled, all VHC equipment is removed and a complete paint job is carried out. The only concession to the original was that the headlight bubbles, removed during a previous restoration, were not reinstalled, in accordance with the owner's wishes. This is a well-known TZ that has been preserved from the horrors of competition at the time. In beautiful condition, it's still ready to offer exceptional sensations. Erratum: Chassis 071 is still in the hands of Steve Forrestal. The wrecked car was acquired in October 1988 by Albrecht G. Guggisberg. Guggisberg restored the car by changing the chassis, which was too badly damaged, while retaining as many original parts as possible. In 1993, he sold the car to Gérald Bugnon. 1964 ALFA ROMEO GUILIA TZ Chassis AR 750071 Swiss registration document Temporary import into the European Union - Alfa Romeo certificate - Racing Car Show 1965 - Ex John Dolley In the early 1960s, Alfa Romeo began work on a replacement for the s

Estim. 800,000 - 1,200,000 EUR

Porsche 356 C Carrera 22000 GS 1963 - Spanish registration title FFVE Certificate FIVA Card Inaugurated at the 1 9 5 5 Frankfurt Motor Show with the 1500 GS, the very exclusive 356 Carrera series ended in 1963 with the appearance of the 356 C Carrera 2 / 2000 GS, equipped with the 130 hp 1,966cc 4-cam dual ignition engine derived from that of the 550 Spyder; this final 356 Carrera, the fastest “civilian” 356 ever produced, was also one of the rarest, with only 126 examples built. The car illustrated on these pages, one of the last in this small series, was delivered new to Porsche Autohaus Kahrmann in Fulda, Germany for export to the USA on 12 August 1963; the car, delivered new in the very elegant colour of Ruby Red 6402 with its extremely rare optional sunroof, is still fitted with its original engine, gearbox and carburettors. There are now six owners between California, New York and Europe, the current one having acquired it in 2009 at the Techno Classica Essen show from specialist Ande Votteler; we are in possession of the vehicle’s history, all arranged chronologically in a large file that will be given to the purchaser: each owner is listed, along with a number of letters, period documents (including the original user’s manual), press articles and, of course, service invoices dating back to 1992, with the added bonus of an expert report by the very serious and renowned Klaus Kukuk. According to the documents in our possession, the car has clocked up 192,000 km since new! Its mileage counter was replaced on 28 February 1992 shortly after its arrival in Europe and now shows 40,000 km, corroborating a report detailing each of its servicing since 31 May 1989; it is important to point out that the car has been serviced annually by one of the leading Porsche specialists in Spain since its purchase in 2009 by the current owner. During our test drive, we were impressed by the car’s impeccable handling, roadholding, precise steering and comfort, while on the mechanical side, the perfect tuning of the engine and the precision of the gearbox ensure performance that is still up to date and impressive for its time; the rarity of the 356 Carrera, its performance and its undeniable sporting success make it one of the most sought-after Porsches on the market, making this matching numbers example in very good condition and with a comprehensive history file a particularly attractive opportunity.

Estim. 400,000 - 600,000 EUR

1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale 750 SS "Muso Basso" by Bertone Series: AR10120 00048 Engine: AR00120 0017 Swiss registration Vehicle temporarily imported into the EU Alfa Romeo certificate - Rare Muso Basso version - Quality restoration - One of the few SS with a Palmarès. The collaboration between Alfa Romeo and Bertone gave rise to some exceptional projects, thanks to the genius of its designer Franco Scaglione. The "BAT" (Berlina Aerodinamica Tecnica) and "Disco Volante" projects gave rise to the "Sprint Speciale" in prototype form in 1957, then in series production from 1959. From 1960 onwards, the car evolved to comply with American standards. The first series, type 750 SS, was produced in a run of around 100 examples to obtain homologation for use in competition. This series is distinguished by its lack of bumpers and its "Muso Basso" nose. The example we present here, the 48th produced, was delivered new from the Porto dealership in Portugal under the registration number OP 21-55 on August 19, 1959. Its first owner was none other than Manuel Nogueira Pinto, the famous Portuguese racing driver of the 1960s. As soon as he received his car, he entered several competitions. He took second place in the Vila do Conde race in 1959, entered under number 11 (see photograph). He soon exchanged his Alfa Romeo and an assistance truck for the driver Frederico José Carlos Themudo (known as Fritz d'Oray) for a Ferrari 250 GT. At the end of 1959, Fritz d'Oray, then an F1 driver with Maserati, was hired by the Serenissima Scuderia to drive a 250 GT SWB in the 1960 Le Mans 24 Hours. Having never raced at Le Mans, he decided to train before qualifying, and did so with this Alfa Romeo Guilietta SS. Injured with his Ferrari during qualifying, he spent several months in hospital. The Alfa Romeo was left in the parking lot and impounded. Fritz d'Oray kept his Sprint Special until the mid-60s. This Guilietta SS then had another Portuguese owner. In 1980, the car changed hands and became the property of a Lisbon enthusiast, José Augusto Xavier Moreira. He kept it for 10 years. In 1990, our Guilietta SS left Portugal for the first time. It was acquired by Dr. Richard Schimmer of Düsseldorf. He undertook a restoration of the car, which lasted over 10 years. In 2004, Gerald Bugnon acquired the unfinished car through Garage Vetter. Vetter took on the task of restoring the mechanics, which had been left intact in Germany, and completing the work that had already begun. The work was completed in 2006. A total of over CHF 90,000 was spent to bring the car up to its current state, including upholstery, fittings, mechanics and running gear. Today, almost 20 years after the work was completed, the car remains in a very fine state, testifying to the quality of the work carried out. This automotive masterpiece represents the pinnacle of Bertone design in the 50s! 1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale 750 SS "Muso Basso" by Bertone Series: AR10120 00048 Engine: AR00120 0017 Swiss registration Vehicle temporarily imported into the EU Alfa Romeo certificate - Rare Muso Basso version - Quality restoration - One of the few SS to have won a prize. The collaboration between Alfa Romeo and Bertone gave rise to some exceptional projects thanks to its genius designer Franco Scaglione. The "BAT" (Berlina Aerodinamica Tecnica) and "Disco Volante" projects gave rise to the "Sprint Speciale" in prototype form in 1957 and then in series production from 1959. From 1960 onwards, the car evolved to comply with American standards. Around 100 of the first series, the 750 SS, were produced to obtain homologation for use in competition. This series can be distinguished by its lack of bumpers and its nose nicknamed 'Muso Basso'. The car we are presenting here, the 48th to be produced, was delivered new from the Porto dealership in Portugal under the registration number OP 21-55 on 19 August 1959. Its first owner was none other than Manuel Nogueira Pinto, the famous Portuguese racing driver of the 1960s. As soon as he received his car, he entered several competitions. He took second place in the Vila do Conde race in 1959, entered under number 11 (see photograph). He soon swapped his Alfa Romeo and an assistance truck for the driver Frederico José Carlos Themudo (known as Fritz d'Oray) for a Ferrari 250 GT. At the end of 1959, Fritz d'Oray, then an F1 driver with Maserati, was hired by the Serenissima Scuderia to drive a 250 GT SWB in the 1960 Le Mans 24 Hours. Having never raced at Le Mans, he decided to train befor

Estim. 300,000 - 350,000 EUR

1962 ALFA ROMEO GIULIETTA SPRINT ZAGATO "Coda Tonda Serial number: AR1012600136 Engine number: 00120 01724 Swiss registration Vehicle temporarily imported into the EU - Winner of the 1962 Coupe du Salon in the 1000/1300 category - Tour Auto 1980 winner - Ex Maurice Sausay and Jean Gonguet Zagato and Alfa Romeo are two legendary automotive names! The association of these two great geniuses gave birth to legendary vehicles. Stopped during the war, this collaboration resumed in the 50s with the 1900 and then the Giulietta. An exceptional base for the quality of its design, it enabled the greatest Italian coachbuilders to demonstrate the breadth of their genius. After a successful SVZ, Zagato presented the Sprint Zagato in 1960, the coachbuilder's response to Bertone's Sprint Spéciale. The Sprint Zagato is much sportier than its competitor. Weighing just 785 kg for around 115 hp, the Sprint Zagato was soon adopted by many drivers, who went from strength to strength, thanks in particular to its top speed of 200 km/h. This model was delivered new on 16/02/1962 by the Aix-les-Bains dealership to Jean Gonguet. An amateur racing driver, notably for AC Savoie, he took part in the Coupes du Salon in October 1962, winning the 1000/1300 cm3 class and a respectable eighth place overall. In April 1963, the car became the property of Bertrand Buisson, and he kept it until January 1964. That year, the car changed hands twice. In December 1964, the car was acquired by Monsieur Fernandez, who didn't sell it until July 1968. The car was then acquired by Bruno Celice, an enthusiast living in Paris, who enjoyed his beautiful Alfa-Romeo until April 1979. The car was then sold by Hervé Poulain in his famous Art et Automobile sale at the Palais des Congrès under lot 276. During this sale, the car became the property of Maurice Sausay. A great driver and VHC pioneer, Sausay took part in numerous events with this car. As efficient as ever, the SZ won the 1980 Tour Auto, then the same year the Mont Blanc Rally. In 1981, Jean Pierre Mondonnet acquired this car, and took part in numerous events with it, winning a respectable 3rd place in the 1984 VHC championship. At the end of 1985, the SZ was acquired by François Melcion, Historical Director of the Retromobile Show, who kept it until 1987. That year, it came into the possession of Jean Louis Balleret, a lawyer and lover of fine automobiles. He didn't sell it to Gérald Bugnon until 1993. Immediately after its purchase, Bugnon took part in the Cévenoles Retro rally, and the following year in the Tour Auto. During the Tour Auto, the car suffered a minor accident, but made it to the finish line. Immediately after the race, the restoration of the car was launched. The work was entrusted to the Galbiati workshops in Milan, and was completed by the end of 1995. With the restoration complete, the SZ was back on the rally circuit. In 1998, Gérald Bugnon met Jean Gonguet and presented the car to him. (see photograph). 45 years later, the first owner finds the beautiful car that helped him win the Coupe du Salon. In 2005, the engine was rebuilt and prepared in the Dieter Woyke workshops. In the same year, when the FIA passport was renewed, the running gear and rear axle were overhauled. In 2011, the car is returned to its original configuration, with the FIA equipment removed. The clutch and exhaust system were also overhauled. Today, the car is in generally good condition. The test drive revealed a pleasant car with good mechanical performance. Eligible for numerous events, this beautiful SZ is now just waiting for a new enthusiast. 1962 ALFA ROMEO GIULIETTA SPRINT ZAGATO "Coda Tonda Serial number: AR1012600136 Engine number: 00120 01724 Swiss registration Vehicle temporarily imported into the EU - Winner of the 1962 Coupe du Salon in the 1000/1300 category - Winner of the Tour Auto 1980 - Ex Maurice Sausay and Jean Gonguet Zagato and Alfa Romeo are two legendary names in motoring! The association of these two great geniuses gave birth to legendary vehicles. The collaboration was interrupted during the war, but resumed in the 1950s with the 1900 and then the Giulietta. The Giulietta was an exceptional car in terms of the quality of its design, allowing the greatest Italian coachbuilders to demonstrate the breadth of their genius. After a successful SVZ, in 1960 Zagato presented the Zagato Sprint, the coachbuilder's response to Bertone's Sprint Spéciale. The Sprint Zagato was much sportier than its competitor. Weighing just 785 kg and generating around 115 bhp, the Sprint Zagato was quickly adopted by many drivers,

Estim. 300,000 - 500,000 EUR

Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 RS 1974 - Spanish registration title FFVE Certificate A direct descendant and technical evolution of the 2.7 RS, the 3.0 RS was produced in just one year, in just 54 examples (compared with 1,580 examples of the 2.7 RS)! Slimmed down (1,060 kg on the scales) with the use of fibre components, and with a 911/77-type engine bored to 2,995 cc and boosted to 230 hp, this genuine rarity was a real racing beast developed to win in its class, the famous Gr. 3, which it did brilliantly, including a 12th place finish overall in the 1970 Le Mans 24 Hours. Our example, delivered new to its first owner in July 1974, is no more and no less than the penultimate car in this very exclusive series of 54 cars; it quickly changed hands in 1975, when it was bought by the German driver Leo Eigner, who had his new acquisition followed by the dealer and tuner Hahn, the same company that looks after the Porsches entered in the highly competitive German ADAC championship. Eigner raced this 3.0 RS until 1977, taking the start of no fewer than 30 races, with 10 wins, nine 2nd places, six 3rd places, and so on. This impressive list of achievements was completed in 1978 by another German driver, Alfred Spaeh, the new owner of #9108, who sold it in 1979 to the Swiss collector Sidney Ho. The car, which had been in storage since 1988, was bought in 2000 by the British Porsche specialist Edmond Harris, who undertook a total restoration of the car, before selling it to a Greek enthusiast, who in turn entrusted it to the unmissable Porsche dealer Le Maxted Page in 2014; it was at this point that the current owner acquired it, driving and maintaining #9108 on a regular basis thereafter, which will be seen in particular at the start of the 2017 Tour Auto, driven by Derek Bell and Carlos Beltran. This extremely rare 3.0 RS, matching colours (Guards Red) and numbers, perfectly documented (invoice from the 1980s onwards, Porsche archives, Jurgen Barth’s report, etc.) and boasting a solid track record in periods spent on the most legendary German and Dutch circuits (Hockenheim, Avus, Zandvoort, Zolder, etc.), will appeal to all Porsche enthusiasts; with its Historic Technical Passport (HTP valid until 2027), it will also delight those who want to take part in the Le Mans Classic or the Tour Auto with a car that is easy to drive, reliable, high-performance and versatile... Wouldn’t that be the definition of the grail?

Estim. 1,000,000 - 1,400,000 EUR

1963 Alfa Romeo SZ Coda Tronca Chassis AR 126 00213 Engine 00120 0820 Swiss registration Temporary import into the European Union - One of the last SZs produced - Only 44 produced The story of the SZ Coda Tronca began with an accident. In 1961, driver Francesco De Leonibus had his SZ re-bodied by Micheloti following an accident, and the latter produced a longer, tapered line. On the Monza circuit, Francesco De Leonibus recorded a breathtaking top speed (222.22 km/h). Following this achievement, Zagato immediately set about designing a new body for the SZ. He redesigned the body first by lengthening the muzzle and tail (the rear), then by modifying the roof as well, and finally, to obtain an even more aerodynamic shape, he decided to truncate the rear of the car, based on the theories of German aerodynamic engineer Wunibald Kamm. Zagato, not being equipped with a wind tunnel, carried out a series of tests on freeways, using the cornerstones as a reference, and the faithful designer Ercole Spada as timekeeper sitting on the ground. The final result was ready a few months later, and Zagato himself entered the new SZ in the 1961 Monza Grand Prix, winning the race ahead of Micheloti's revised SZ. Following this success, production of the second series of SZs was launched. Mechanically, the second series retained all the attributes of the first SZ. A notable difference was that, despite the car's lengthening, it lost 15 kg and now weighs just 840 kg. Thanks to these improvements, top speed is now well over 200 km/h, flirting with 215 km/h. The example we present here left the Zagato workshops on December 7, 1962. On January 15, 1963, the car was delivered by Dutch importer Louwman Parqui in Leidschendam. It is one of the few chassis equipped from the outset with front disc brakes. The car then passed into the hands of collector and dealer Roy Karsten, a great fan of the marque. He exhibited it in his showroom in Noordwijk for around ten years, taking part in a number of events, including the commemoration of Alfa Romeo's 80th anniversary in 1990. The car was painted in a pale yellow hue. Towards the end of the 90s, the SZ entered the collection of Gérald Bugnon, who drove it for a few years before embarking on a major restoration, wishing to integrate his SZ into his personal VHC team, il Biscione Corsa Romand. The job was entrusted to the Dante workshops, who built a new body for the SZ to Zagato's design. The original bodywork was retained and handed over to the purchaser. The mechanics, like the running gear, were completely revised and perfected. The car took part in a few events before being redesigned for more regular and touring use. It was a pivotal car in Zagato's history, bringing innovations that would be carried over to the TZ. Exceptional roadholding and mythical design are two reasons to acquire this superb Alfa Romeo SZ. 1963 Alfa Romeo SZ Coda Tronca Chassis AR 126 00213 Engine 00120 0820 Swiss registration document Temporary import into the European Union - One of the last SZs produced - Only 44 produced The story of the SZ Coda Tronca began with an accident. In 1961, driver Francesco De Leonibus had his SZ re-bodied by Micheloti following an accident, and the latter created a longer, tapered line. On the Monza circuit, Francesco De Leonibus recorded a breathtaking top speed (222.22 km/h). Following this achievement, Zagato immediately set about designing a new body for the SZ. He redesigned the body firstly by lengthening the muzzle and the tail (the rear), then by also modifying the roof and finally, to obtain an even more aerodynamic shape, he decided to truncate the rear of the car, based on the theories of the German aerodynamic engineer Wunibald Kamm. Zagato did not have a wind tunnel, so he carried out a series of tests on the motorways, using the cornerstones as a reference and the faithful designer Ercole Spada as a timekeeper sitting on the ground. The final result was ready a few months later, and Zagato himself entered the new SZ in the 1961 Monza Grand Prix, winning the race ahead of Micheloti's revised SZ. Following this success, production of the second series of SZs was launched. Mechanically, the second series retained all the attributes of the first SZ. The notable difference was that, despite the lengthening of the car, it lost 15 kg and weighed just 840 kg. Thanks to these improvements, the top spee

Estim. 600,000 - 800,000 EUR

1965 ALFA ROMEO Giulia Sprint GTA Chassis AR613276 Engine AR 00 559 05026 No registration document FIA passport 169 hp on test bench Alfa Romeo certificate Introduced in 1965, the GTA was the official competition version of the Giulia Sprint GT and was produced in road (stradale) and racing (corsa) variants. The latter was the responsibility of the Autodelta factory's racing department. The GTA was distinguished by its aluminum body panels, Plexiglas side and rear windows, and lightened interior fittings. As a result, the GTA weighs 200 kilograms less than a Sprint GT. Alfa's classic 1,570 cm3 twin-camshaft four-cylinder engine underwent significant modifications for the GTA, with the angle between the valves reduced from 90 to 80 degrees and the size of the valves considerably increased. As there was no longer room between them for a central spark plug, dual ignition was opted for. In road version, the revised engine produced 115 hp, with up to 150 hp available in race version. The GTA made its racing debut on March 20, 1966 at Monza, where Andrea de Adamich and Teodoro Zeccoli triumphed in the four-hour Jolly Club race. From then on, Autodelta-prepared GTAs enjoyed exceptional success, winning the European Touring Car Championship three years running, from 1966 to 1968. To enable homologation, 500 cars were built for racing and road use. The example we offer is one of the 500 GTA Stradale built by Alfa Romeo. Leaving the factory on July 7, 1965, it was delivered on August 30 to the Avellino dealership in Italy. At the time, it was a Biancospino with a Nero Fumo skai interior. The car was then traced back to Switzerland in 1988, when it was owned by Hans Ulrich Kohler. The car was issued with an FIA carnet de passage en douanes by the Automobile Club Suisse. Like many other cars, it was repainted in red. In 1989, the car changed hands and was acquired by Helmut Kuen, a resident of St Moritz. They had the car restored by the Club del Portello workshop, specialists in the make (no invoices on file). In the 90s, the car was acquired by Gerd F. Klein, a German enthusiast. In 1999, it passed into the hands of Patrick Koller, a German collector who kept it until 2006. That year, the car was acquired by Gérald Bugnon. It was then painted Yellow. It then joined his team to compete in a number of VHC championship rallies, including the Acropolis and San Marino. In 2009, the car was reconfigured for track use. It was entered in the Spa 6 Hours in 2010. In 2015, restoration work was undertaken. Everything is revised to FIA specifications. A new engine is developed. When tested in July 2015, it developed 169 hp. After this work, the car will be entered in several rallies in 2016, 2018 and 2020. In 2021, the car's FIA technical passport is renewed. Valid until 2030, it will enable the future owner to enter the car in the world's top events. With its top-quality preparation, this GTA is a true racing machine with a proven track record. 1965 ALFA ROMEO Giulia Sprint GTA Chassis AR613276 Engine AR 00 559 05026 No registration document FIA passport 169 hp on test bench Alfa Romeo certificate Introduced in 1965, the GTA was the official competition version of the Giulia Sprint GT and was produced in road (stradale) and racing (corsa) variants. The latter was the responsibility of the Autodelta factory's racing department. The GTA was distinguished by its aluminium body panels, Plexiglas side and rear windows and lighter interior fittings. As a result, the GTA weighed 200 kilograms less than a Sprint GT. Alfa's classic 1,570 cm3 twin-cam four-cylinder engine underwent significant modifications for the GTA, with the angle between the valves reduced from 90 to 80 degrees and the size of the valves considerably increased. As there was no longer room between them for a central spark plug, a dual ignition system was opted for. In road version, the revised engine produced 115 bhp, with up to 150 bhp available in race version. The GTA made its racing debut on 20 March 1966 at Monza, where Andrea de Adamich and Teodoro Zeccoli triumphed in the Jolly Club four-hour race. From then on, the GTAs prepared by Autodelta enjoyed exceptional success, winning the European Touring Car Championship three years in a row, from 1966 to 1968. To enable homologation, 500 cars were built for racing and road use. The car on offer is one of the 500 GTA Stradale built by Alfa Romeo. It left the factory on 7 July 1965 and was delivered to the Avelli

Estim. 180,000 - 250,000 EUR

Rover Mini, British Open Classic - 24 km 1996 - French registration title No MOT Launched in 1959 by the British Motor Corporation, the Mini is an icon of the Sixties; elegant, agile and efficient in urban traffic as well as on more hostile and sportier terrain, this revolutionary and economical car for its time has delighted generations of drivers. Our example was ordered new from Ets Beaulieu Automobiles, in Salon-de-Provence, in May 1996; this Mini has since been stored at the home of its one and only owner and has never been used, its odometer reading less than 24 km when it finally found the light of day a few weeks ago. It is accompanied by a complete file including order form, purchase invoice, provisional registration document, duplicate keys, as well as all the logbooks and on-board manuals; it still has the stickers displaying its provisional number (the definitive number plates are present but have never been drilled or fitted to the car). In keeping with the special British Open series presented in 1992, it has immaculate British Racing Green bodywork, enhanced by decorative fillets and gold logos, while the interior features comfortable beige velvet upholstery and a leather-wrapped steering wheel, all in new condition; in addition to its light alloy wheels, chrome grille, handles and bumpers, the car’s major asset is its electric canvas sunroof which, when opened, floods the passenger compartment with light. Equipped with a lively, responsive 1300 injection engine, our car (which will have to be restarted) is a magnificent time machine; it represents a unique opportunity to acquire what is certainly the least-mileage Mini on the market in an exceptional state of preservation.

Estim. 20,000 - 40,000 EUR

Porsche 997 GT2 RS 2011 - French registration title With just 500 examples produced, this 911, which gained 90 hp and lost 70 kg compared to its sister, the GT2, and broke the Nürburgring lap record (5 years later, the time would still be 2 seconds quicker than that of the 991.1 GT3 RS!) is without doubt the most exclusive production Porsche since the 1990s; rarer than a Carrera GT or a 918 Spyder, it remained for 7 years the most powerful 911 ever produced, with a whopping 620 hp and 700 Nm of torque... We are delighted to present car number 47 out of 500, sold new by the Centre Porsche Saint- Germain on 19 October 2010 to a resident of Yvelines who had configured it with all the major options available in the catalogue: additional carbon pack, audio pack plus, chrono pack plus, 6-point harness on passenger seat, leather and alcantara inserts...; the first owner drove the car 10,000 km before parting with it in 2015, via the Centre Porsche de Velizy; 6 years and 5,000 km later, it changed hands again, still in the Paris area The current owner, a demanding enthusiast, chose this car, which “ticked all the boxes” for inclusion in his collection! At the beginning of 2024, he decided to have the tyres, brake discs (PCCB carbon-ceramic) and brake pads changed, while the car had just undergone a service and a new piwi test by the Porsche Centre in Roissy. The car fulfilled all our expectations during our test drive, and struck us with its demonic power: at 2,500 rpm and 30 % throttle, the two turbos start to sing, your neck is pressed against the bucket seat and the speed displayed in analogue on the central speedo goes up in flames; the running gear is firm, but the driver remains in a Porsche: it’s a car that’s easy to drive, comfortable and intuitive! The work carried out at the start of the year included changing all four tyres, the front and rear brake pads, replacing the brake fluid followed by servicing and cleaning the brake discs.

Estim. 340,000 - 390,000 EUR

Citroën 2 CV Charleston - 24 km 1990 - French registration title No MOT The Citroën 2CV, a popular icon and a veritable monument to French history, was built in over 5 million units between 1948 and 1990; designed for a hard-working rural population with limited means, it had to have four seats and be capable of carrying 50 kg of luggage at 60 km/h, without exceeding a tax rating of “2 CV”, while being easy to maintain and economical. Presented at the 1980 Paris Motor Show, the 2CV6 Charleston was distinguished by its very smart finish and its black/Delage red colour, in a design reminiscent of the top-of-the-range cars of the 1930s; at the time, the Charleston was only a limited series, intended to be built in 8,000 examples, but it was so successful that Citroën decided to include this new model in its catalogue. Acquired in the summer of 1990 by its one and only owner, our superb example has never left the garage where it has been stored out of sight for 34 years, parked there just after the return journey from the dealership; carefully preserved and protected, its odometer read 23 km when we woke it from its slumber a few weeks ago. This low mileage corresponds to the 9 km driven on the factory test track, plus the 14 km between Ets Chabert, in Salon de Provence, and the owner’s home; our example, which will have to be restarted, is in incredible condition, with every detail to match: original new tyres, period fluids, factory labels and markings, immaculate interior, and so on. Accompanied by its purchase invoice, service booklet, on-board manuals, spare keys and the Antar oil can it was given on delivery, this remarkable 2 CV Charleston, preserved in exceptional condition, is the most desirable car any enthusiast could hope to own.

Estim. 30,000 - 50,000 EUR

1958 ALFA ROMEO GIULIETTA TI TYPE 753 Serial number AR 1468 03980 Engine number AR 1315 84188 Swiss registration Temporary import into the EU - Restored in the 2000s - Alfa Romeo certificate - Same owner for 22 years - One of the first sports sedans - Eligible for many events 25 000 /45 000 € Born in 1955, the Giulietta is considered by Alfa Romeo to be the light at the end of the tunnel, so complicated was the immediate post-war period for the firm in Biscione. Designed around its engine, this small but elegant four-door sedan was well born, both in terms of its road qualities and its finish at a competitive price. The TI version (for Tourisme Internazionale) was introduced in 1957. It was equipped with a 1300 cm3 aluminum engine with double overhead camshafts. Its 65 hp enabled it to reach speeds of almost 160 km/h. It was a famous performer in the Tour de France Automobile, the Mille Miglia, the Monte Carlo and other events... The example we are presenting was delivered new to the brand's Paris dealership on 24/04/1958 in its current configuration: Blue Elvezia with houndstooth upholstery and trim. It was registered 188 QF 31 in Haute Garonne in 1970. It remained in the Toulouse region until 1990. It was then acquired by an enthusiast in Charente Maritime, who kept it until 2001. Mr. Bugnon acquired this Giulietta in July 2001, when the car was in poor condition. In July 2001, restoration work began at the Mario Galbiatti workshops in Arese, restoring the entire car except for the mechanical parts, for a total of €25,000. The engine and running gear will be entrusted to the Calderoni workshops, for a total of over €18,000. Finally, in 2015, a major general overhaul was carried out for a total of over €5,000. Since then, the car has been regularly serviced. Matching Numbers and Matching colors, this Giulietta presents itself in beautiful condition, more than 20 years after the end of its restoration. Celebrating its 70th birthday this year, the car is one of the finest examples of the Giulietta sedan on the market. 1958 ALFA ROMEO GIULIETTA TI TYPE 753 Serial number AR 1468 03980 Engine number AR 1315 84188 Swiss registration document Temporary import into the EU - Restored in 2000 - Alfa Romeo certificate - Same owner for 22 years - One of the first sports saloons - Eligible for many events 25 000 /45 000 € Launched in 1955, the Giulietta is considered by Alfa Romeo to be the light at the end of the tunnel, such was the complexity of the immediate post-war period for the Biscione company. Designed around its engine, this small but elegant four-door saloon was well born, both in terms of its road qualities and its finish at a competitive price. The TI version (for Tourisme Internazionale) was presented in 1957. It was equipped with a 1300 cm3 aluminium engine with twin overhead camshafts. Its 65bhp enabled it to reach speeds of almost 160km/h. It went on to compete in the famous Tour de France Automobile, the Mille Miglia, the Monte Carlo and other events... The car we are presenting was delivered new to the brand's Paris dealership on 24/04/1958 in its current Blue Elvezia configuration, complete with upholstery and houndstooth trim. It was registered 188 QF 31 in Haute Garonne in 1970. It remained in the Toulouse region until 1990. It was then acquired by an enthusiast in Charente Maritime, who kept it until 2001. Mr Bugnon acquired this Giulietta in July 2001, when the car was in a poor state of repair. Restoration work began in July 2001 at the Mario Galbiatti workshops in Arese, where the entire car was restored, with the exception of the mechanical parts, at a total cost of €25,000. The engine and running gear will be entrusted to the Calderoni workshops, which will carry out a complete overhaul for a total of more than €18,000. Finally, in 2015, a major general overhaul was carried out for a total of more than €5,000. Since then, the car has been regularly serviced. Matching numbers and colours, this Giulietta is in beautiful condition, more than 20 years after the end of its restoration. Celebrating its 70th birthday this year, the car is one of the finest examples of the Giulietta saloon available on the market.

Estim. 25,000 - 45,000 EUR

Richard Gordon's 18K Gold Omega Speedmaster Professional 1969 Apollo 11 Commemorative Watch - Richard Gordon’s personally-owned and -worn 18K solid yellow gold Omega Speedmaster Professional BA 145.022 presented to him at a special gala dinner on November 25, 1969, at the Hotel Warwick in Houston, Texas. Omega initially created 26 of these gold commemorative watches—known as the ‘Tribute to Astronauts’ watch—to present to NASA astronauts alive and deceased, with the case back of each watch specially engraved with a quote, the name and missions of the astronaut, and a unique number relative to when the astronaut flew into space. This watch’s case back, issued as “No. 20,” is encircled, “Astronaut Richard R. Gordon, Gemini 11 - Apollo 12.” The special central quote reads: “To mark man’s conquest of space with time, through time, on time.” The first gold Speedmaster that Omega created, the watch features an 18K gold case with the same design cues and dimensions as the regular steel Speedmaster Professional. The gold bezel has a burgundy red aluminum inlay, with the famous ‘dot over ninety,’ and a special solid gold dial, indicated by the “OM” next to “Swiss Made,” which means ‘Or Massif’ or ‘solid gold.’ The hour markers are made of onyx, have two facets each, and are set in gold frames. The hands are black with gold centers and give wonderful contrast to the solid gold dial. The gold bracelet (1116/575) features hollow links and a 14mm gold clasp with striping decoration. Inside the 18k gold 42mm case ticks the Lemania-based copper-colored chronograph caliber 861 with a steel brake; this caliber 861 has a ticking speed of 21,600vph and uses 17 jewels. Cosmetically, the fine timepiece exhibits some wear from use, primarily noticeable in wear to the bezel, as well as a few scratches to the clasp and crystal. Includes its original hinged Omega case, which exhibits some staining or tarnishing on the top of the lid. Accompanied by a typed letter of provenance signed by Richard Gordon, in part: "This Apollo era, special edition, Omega wristwatch was presented to me by Omega during an Apollo XI celebration dinner." He goes on to recognize the error in the engraving, which has an "R" substituted for his middle initial, "F." After the moon-flown Omega Speedmaster Pros—property of the United States government—these Apollo XI commemorative 18K gold chronographs stand at the forefront of space watch lore. Issued in an extremely limited number to commemorate the Apollo 11 landing, the first twenty-eight watches produced were reserved for President Richard Nixon (#1) and Vice President Spiro T. Agnew (#2), followed by the 26 astronauts who paved the way for the moon landings in the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs. Only 19 of the 26 astronauts honored were able to attend the gala dinner at which they were presented—the Apollo 12 crew was still in quarantine after their return to Earth on November 24, 1969, and the Apollo 1 crew were being recognized posthumously. These early watches all feature the special central engraving, "To mark man’s conquest of space with time, through time, on time." The publicly available version of the watch (numbers 33-1000) was issued with a caseback commemorating Apollo 11 and the Speedmaster's status as 'the first watch worn on the moon.' Omega returned to the special engraving for the astronaut watches later issued to the crews of Apollo 14-17. The elusive gold astronaut chronograph also takes a place as the most expensive Speedmaster Pro ever sold: in October 2022, RR Auction sold Wally Schirra's example of the Apollo 11 commemorative 18K gold Omega Speedmaster Professional chronograph watch (Ref. BA 145.022) for nearly $2 million.

Estim. 100,000 - 150,000 USD

Wright Brothers: Original c. 1908-1909 Photo Album by Jimmy Hare, with First Published Photos of Wright Flyer - Historic original photo album compiled by pioneering Collier's photojournalist Jimmy Hare, measuring 14.75 x 11.25, containing 54 original affixed silver gelatin photographs of the Wright Brothers' demonstration flights in 1908 and 1909, ranging in size from 4.25 x 3.25 to 6 x 4, many of which have been captioned in white ink. The album begins with a photo of four journalists, labeled: "Correspondents crossing sand dune to see if Wright Bros. are actually flying at Kill Devil Hill, N. C." Following are a series of images chronicling the setup of the Wright Flyer for launch using the 'Wright catapult,' involving a long rail and launch tower used to boost the initial speed of the plane to achieve sustained powered flight: images are identified as "The starting rail," "Placing 'plane on rail," "Adjusting the release," "About to start the engine," "Engine started, propellors working," and "Flying low." Various photos that follow show the aircraft in various states of flight, including a "Rear view of 'plane," "Underneath view," "Flying at various altitudes," "Turning corners," and "Landing rather heavily." Among the early pilots and passengers depicted are Orville Wright, Wilbur Wright, Major George Owen Squier (who wrote the specifications for the Army’s first airplane, the Wright Flyer), and Thomas Selfridge, who became the first person to die in an airplane crash shortly after the photograph was taken (labeled "Last picture of Lieut. Selfridge before the accident"). Some other images show the crowd at the demonstration flight performed before President William H. Taft and congressional leaders at Fort Myer in Arlington, Virginia, on July 29, 1909. The photo album itself is in overall good to very good condition, with evidence of removal of several photographs, the black pages detached at the spine, and some wear and chipping to the covers and pages; the photographs themselves are fine, with some mild silvering to darker areas. The very first photograph of the Wright Flyer in flight is, of course, the iconic 'First Flight' photo taken on December 17, 1903. But this iconic Wright photo was not published until four months after Hare's photos were published: the 'First Flight' image first appeared in the September 1908 issue of the Century Magazine, in an article entitled 'The Wright Brothers' Aeroplane' by Orville And Wilbur Wright. Hare's earliest Wright Bros. photographs, taken at Kitty Hawk in 1908, were captured during the Wrights' preparations for the upcoming world debut of the Wright Flyer. Wilbur would depart for France before the month was out to demonstrate the airplane in Europe, a new-build Flyer shipped to France disassembled. Orville, in September, would be flying the flight trials for the U.S. Army at Fort Myer, Virginia—flights also documented within this album. It is further accompanied by an eight-page handwritten manuscript in pencil, ostensibly in the hand of Jimmy Hare, attesting to his experience photographing the Wright Brothers' flights. In small part: "For many years I had been assured by admiring friends that I was the first photographer to get a picture of the Wright bros. in their aeroplane as it was called at that time, but of late years I have seen a photograph evidently made by the Wright Bros...but was not given out for publication until later. I still believe mine was the first published in the Collier's (or the most popular weekly of that time)." The manuscript has been edited in another hand, with various corrections throughout and sections struck through. Jimmy Hare (1856-1946) was a leading photojournalist from 1898 to 1931, covering five major wars (Spanish-American War, Russo-Japanese War, Mexican Revolution, First Balkan War, and World War I). He was a driving force behind Collier's popularity as an illustrated weekly, and is also known for chronicling the evolution of early aircraft, his exotic photographs from Latin America and the Middle East, and his coverage of American presidents.

Estim. 10,000 - 12,000 USD

Apollo 10 Flown Oversized American Flag - From the Collection of Tom Stafford - Immense flown American flag carried into lunar orbit during the Apollo 10 mission, 18.5″ x 11.5″, signed and flight-certified in black ballpoint, “Flown to the moon on Apollo X, May 1969, Tom Stafford,” and in black ink, “Gene Cernan.” Archivally matted and framed with a Stafford-signed lunar photo to an overall size of 26.5 x 26.5. In fine condition. Accompanied by a detailed letter of provenance signed “Thomas P. Stafford,” written on his personal stationery, which reads: “The accompanying Apollo X United States Flag was carried by me aboard the Command Module ‘Charlie Brown’ in orbit around the Moon. This United States Flag made of Nylon and measures 12 inches by 18 inches was carried by me to the Moon in May of 1969 as part of my personal preference kit (PPK) and later signed by both me and Gene Cernan. The Apollo X (10) spacecraft was launched from Cape Kennedy at 12:49 p.m. on May 18, 1969. This mission was the first flight of lunar module (LM-4) to the Moon. After the spacecraft completed one and a half revolutions of the Earth, the S-IVB 3rd stage booster was reignited to increase the speed of the spacecraft to the velocity required to escape the gravitational attraction of the Earth. Three days later, the spacecraft was placed in orbit around the Moon. Nineteen color television transmissions (totaling 5 hours 52 minutes) of remarkable quality provided the world audience with the 1st color television in space and the best exposure yet to spacecraft activities and spectacular views of the earth and the moon. Gene Cernan and I descended in the lunar module to an altitude of less than 47,000 feet above the Moon. At this altitude, we were able to reconnoiter the proposed Apollo 11 landing site. The LM then completed the 1st successful rendezvous in lunar orbit with John Young in the command module. We began the return journey to Earth. During re-entry we reached a velocity of 24,791 mph which is still the record for the fastest that any human has ever traveled, making this flag one of the fastest objects carried by humans in space. Splashdown occurred at 12:52 p.m. on May 26, 1969, 1.3 nautical miles from the target landing point. During the Apollo Program, it was NASA's policy to allow astronauts to keep personal items from their mission as personal mementos, and I accordingly chose to include this United States Flag among mine. This US Flag then remained a treasured part of my personal space collection from December 1972, when it was returned to me by NASA.” A patriotic extension from one of the Apollo program's most significant missions, one deemed the 'dress rehearsal' for the Apollo 11 moon landing. This flag orbited the moon a total of 31 revolutions and traveled nearly 830,000 miles during its eight-day voyage before re-entering the Earth's atmosphere at a world-record speed of 24,791 mph, or Mach 36—making it the fastest large U.S. flag ever flown. An incredible Apollo-era artifact made all the more desirable for its rock-solid provenance and atypically large size.

Estim. 20,000 - 25,000 USD

Hermann Oberth Typed Manuscript Signed - 'The Moon Car' - Fascinating typed manuscript from rocket pioneer Hermann Oberth entitled “The Moon Car,” two pages, 8.5 x 9, dated 1957, signed at the conclusion in blue ink, “H. Oberth.” The manuscript, which contains Oberth’s prescient thoughts on a potential moon-landing and the best course of action to explore its terrain, reads: “I assume that the Moon expedition has covered the 384,000 km (238,000 miles) from the space station to the Earth's satellite and has carried out the none-too-easy landing on its surface. The crew has survived its many trials and excitements, has taken the first historic steps on lunar soil, and has made a few cautious moves in the immediate neighborhood of its ship. The explorers will not have to go far to find a whole series of problems. The nature of the Moon's surface, the rocks lying about the more or less thick layer of dust covering everything will, as far as our knowledge goes, be found within a few hundred miles. But the day will dawn when the work to be done close at hand is over and the point in the scheduled program will be reached where more distant goals are involved. There are many phenomena on the Moon's surface which cannot be explained until a Moon expedition has landed. Its members will not be able to do much on foot because the things they wish to investigate are widely scattered over the Moon's surface. Even if a particularly favorable place is chosen for the landing, hundreds of miles will have to be covered. Not to explore but merely to stay at the landing point and be satisfied with the first steps around it would be to throw away all the money spent on the expedition. When an expedition on the Earth proposes to reconnoiter unexplored territory, it unloads the helicopters it has brought, assembled them, and sends some men with good eyes (and better field glasses) to have a look around. Fixed-wing aircraft are usually brought along as well so that communication with civilization can be maintained, even in the deepest jungle, and outgoing and incoming mail can be handled. Much progress has been made since the adventurous and laborious journeys made by explorers at the end of the last century. Aerial surveys will not be necessary on the Moon. They will have been made with space telescopes before the landing. Moreover, it would be impossible to fly aircraft on the Moon because its atmosphere (if the residual gases there deserve the term) is far too rarefied. The only thing to be done, therefore, is to travel over its surface. But there is a snap even here. The expedition can- not just take a jeep; unload it, and start it up, and be off. The normal internal-combustion engine needs oxygen from the air, and there is not air on the Moon. A special vehicle must be designed and built. Somebody once suggested a kind of manually operated car on the lines of children's tricycles, which could be started moving in a cumbrous way by ‘pumping’ with both arms. Such a contraption would be very tiring for the Moon travelers. Wernher von Braun provided his Moon expedition with caterpillar-track vehicles resembling tanks; this is far better. But what happens when His Moon explorers come to a wide cleft or a deep chasm? There are plenty of cracks and crevices on the Moon's surface, and the author himself has pointed out in his book how difficult and time-wasting travel would be with the tracked vehicles he suggests. None of these ideas and plans satisfied me, so I produced my own design. My machine can travel on land or fly, though it would perhaps be better to say it can run on the ground and hop. It can even make quite big jumps in order to make movement over cracks and crevices easier and give a better view from above. A Moon expedition able to make big jumps will be very well off. It will be highly mobile, able to move about in comfort and to travel in long kangaroo leaps at high speed over the virgin wastes. We may compare this form of travel with flying, or call it ‘a hop, skip, and jump.’ In fine condition.

Estim. 1,500 - 2,000 USD

Wernher von Braun Handwritten Manuscript on Rocket Propulsion and Atomic Energy - Handwritten draft manuscript by aerospace engineer and space architect Wernher von Braun, which contains subject matter similar to 'Crossing the Last Frontier,’ his famous inaugural article in Collier's 'Man Will Conquer Space Soon!' series, which appeared in the March 22, 1952 issue of the magazine. The 13-page manuscript, unsigned and undated, written in pencil on 8 x 10 sheets of notebook paper, reads, in part: “These projectiles utilize the same principle of propulsion as the jet airplane. It is based on Isaac Newton's third law of motion, which can be stated this way: for every action there must be a reaction of equal force, but in the opposite direction. A good example is the firing of a bullet from a rifle. When you pull the trigger and the bullet speeds out of the barrel, there is a recoil which slams the rifle butt back against your shoulders. Why? The exploding powder exerts an equal pressure in all directions.” Von Braun continues on the topic of propulsion: “Small rockets, such as the well-known 4th of July rockets, utilize solid propellants wherein the ‘fuel’ and the oxidizer’ are blended like in gun powder...For simplicity you cannot beat a ‘solid’ rocket. But along with this tremendous advantage the solid rocket has inherent shortcomings...For these reasons designers of large rockets switch to liquid propellants. In order to be able to utilize powerful propellant combinations, they use separate ‘fuel’ and ‘oxidizer’ and store them in different tanks. In order to save dead weight, they do not pressurize these tanks but use pumps to feed both propellants into a combustion chamber of ‘rocket motor,’ which alone has to be sufficiently thickwalled to withstand the high combustion pressure.” Von Braun then makes a “checklist of the most important factors a rocket engineer must consider in making his choice of propellants.” He then asks the question: “What about the possibility of utilizing atomic energy for the propulsion of a satellite rocket ship?” Von Braun writes: “We must bear in mind that the only known way of releasing atomic energy is its transformation into heat energy. In the atom bomb, this heat is released abruptly in one bright blinding flash. It is the heat radiation emanating from this flash that may set buildings in the target area afire. And it is the tremendous amount of heat energy suddenly released within a small volume of air which builds up such a terrific local air pressure that the shock wave, along which this pressure responds, may destroy solid structures as far as a mile away. In a ‘pile’ the transformation of atomic energy into heat takes place slowly and under control. But all we get out of our atomic energy is still only heat.” In fine condition. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Stephen Hankow of Farthest Reaches, who states that this manuscript “originates from the personal collection of Doris Hunter, former Head Archivist of the WWB Collection of the Alabama Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama.”

Estim. 600 - 800 USD