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Old Masters (before 1870)

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Vincenzo Catena 1480 Venezia-1531 ? - Madonna and Child with St. John between Saints Zacharias and Catherine of Siena The work presented here takes up a composition typical of artistic production from the Veneto area in the second half of the 15th century: a sacred conversation set in the open air, in which the figures of the Madonna and saints, depicted in half-length, stand out monumentally against a clear blue sky. This prototype of Bellini's matrix, is later taken up and reinterpreted by Vincenzo Catena, the author of our painting, who replicates it several times, placing at the center of the composition the Virgin and Child in silent dialogue with St. John, St. Zacharias and a saint, identified as Catherine of Siena because of her royalty and rich robe. Of the same composition, in fact, there is also another version currently preserved in the Muzeum Naradowe w Poznaniu in Poznan, Poland. Cm 72X104 probably panel transported on canvas Private collection, Genoa The work presented here takes up a composition typical of artistic production from the Veneto area in the second half of the 15th century: a sacred conversation set outdoors, in which the figures of the Madonna and saints, depicted in half-length, stand out monumentally against a clear blue sky. This prototype of Bellini's matrix, is later taken up and reinterpreted by Vincenzo Catena, the author of our painting, who replicates it several times, placing at the center of the composition the Virgin and Child in silent dialogue with St. John, St. Zacharias and a saint, identified as Catherine of Siena because of her royalty and rich robe. Of the same composition, in fact, there is also another version currently preserved in the Muzeum Naradowe w Poznaniu in Poznan, Poland.

Estim. 20,000 - 30,000 EUR

PIER DANDINI - (Florence, 1646 - 1712) Venus and Adonis Oil on canvas, 172X211.5 cm. Provenance: Florence, Pandolfini, November 26, 2019, lot 12 (as Pier Dandini) Traced back to the catalog of Pier Dandini by Sandro Bellesi, the canvas is a felicitous pictorial and compositional example of the artist, who was a masterful interpreter of the stylistic development of the late Tuscan Baroque and as attentive as ever to the influences of Pietro da Cortona, active at Palazzo Pitti between 1637 and 1647, and Luca Giordano, who during the early 1680s was engaged at Palazzo Medici Riccardi. Influences that ours also learned during his stay in Rome and Venice, where he stayed until about 1670, eager to put forward his vision as a universal artist, exhibiting a learned and conscious eclecticism. Therefore, the earlier attributions to the Flemish school and Charles Dauphin, symptomatic of his heterogeneous culture, are not surprising. In fact, Sandro Bellesi points out that the work shows only in part the typical characteristics of the artist, observing clear influences of lagoon painting and in particular to Pietro Negri, Pietro della Vecchia and Antonio Zanchi, indicative also of an execution to the youth period, shortly after 1670, the year of his return to Tuscany after a long stay in the lagoon. Probable comparisons with the altarpiece in Siena cathedral depicting the Mystical Marriage of Saint Catherine of Siena and with Saint Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi receiving the veil of Purity from the Virgin and Child Jesus kept in the church of San Bartolomeo in Prato. The work is accompanied by a critical file by Sandro Bellesi. Reference bibliography: S. Bellesi, Pier Dandini and his school, Florence 2014, ad vocem

Estim. 8,000 - 12,000 EUR

Marco Liberi 1640 Venezia-1725 Venezia - Fortune and Prudence Published on the Zeri Photo Library as Pietro Liberi (card no. 56964) "Fortune has been portrayed in her own recognized attributes of nudity, the wheel, and the wind-waved cloak. The latter two peculiarities describe the fickleness with which Fortune dispenses her favors. In this painting, Fortune embraces Prudence, which in turn can be distinguished in the symbols of the mirror and the serpent, indicating how caution is needed in order not to dissipate the fruits acquired through good fortune. The canvas has been rightly attributed to Marco Liberi by virtue of certain typifications dear to the painter and included by Ruggeri in the catalog by the painter. The refined description of the allegory is connoted, in fact, with some features peculiar to Marco's expected painting, see the design of the faces, specifically the lips, and the graceful curly hair of the two female figures. The artist reiterates in this work that he has well mastered a theme that falls within the mythological-sensual representations dear to his illustrious parent. Woven with chromatics in lowered, almost stark tones, the canvas has been likened by Romei and Tosini to the Jupiter and Asteria of the Szépmüvèszeti Múzeum in Budapest, a signed work by Marco Liberi. More pertinent seems to us the comparison with the possible subject of the Jupiter, disguised as Diana, seduces Callisto by Pietro Liberi in the Hampton Court and private collection versions, with the same vis a vis proposition of the effigy characters. Marco Liberi's drawing on the works of his father Pietro is, moreover, an established custom due to the close and diuturnal collaboration between the two artisans." W 77 - H 62 Cm oil on canvas Private collection, Pordenone F. Romei and P. Tosini, Venetian Collections in the Pictures of Umberto Rossi. Paintings and drawings from the 14th to the 18th century, Naples, 1995, p.64@@ U. Ruggeri, Pietro and Marco Liberi. Pittori nella Venezia del Seicento, Stefano Patacconi Editore, Rimini, 1996, p. 301, fig. M46@@@@ Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 52-53 The work is in good conservative/aesthetic condition. Lined. Wood's lamp observation revealed color retouching along the lower horizontal part (at the frame) and some scattered color retouching, also affecting the figures. In order. "Fortune has been effigyed in her own recognized attributes of nudity, the wheel, and the wind-waved cloak. The latter two peculiarities describe the fickleness with which Fortune dispenses her favors. In this painting, Fortune embraces Prudence, which in turn can be distinguished in the symbols of the mirror and the serpent, indicating how caution is needed in order not to dissipate the fruits acquired through good fortune. The canvas has been rightly attributed to Marco Liberi by virtue of certain typifications dear to the painter and included by Ruggeri in the catalog by the painter. The refined description of the allegory is connoted, in fact, with some features peculiar to Marco's expected painting, see the design of the faces, specifically the lips, and the graceful curly hair of the two female figures. The artist reiterates in this work that he has well mastered a theme that falls within the mythological-sensual representations dear to his illustrious parent. Woven with chromatics in lowered, almost stark tones, the canvas has been likened by Romei and Tosini to the Jupiter and Asteria of the Szépmüvèszeti Múzeum in Budapest, a signed work by Marco Liberi. More pertinent seems to us the comparison with the possible subject of the Jupiter, disguised as Diana, seduces Callisto by Pietro Liberi in the Hampton Court and private collection versions, with the same vis a vis proposition of the effigy characters. Marco Liberi's drawing on the works of his father Pietro is, moreover, an established custom due to the close and diuturnal collaboration between the two artisans." https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fo/7zp4rqld66n9gs7b0vjkr/ADKkpOkNFe1yuK_xd7cH4l0?rlkey=88guk39inthmmw82w6we8avcu&st=p42nhzyz&dl=0

Estim. 7,000 - 10,000 EUR

Pietro Della Vecchia 1603 Venezia-1678 Vicenza - The Fortune Teller or Allegory of the Age of Man "The work under investigation here connects at least in part to a theme that began with Michelangelo Merisi and later spread throughout Europe through the works expected by the ranks of Italian and foreign Caravaggists. The subject is that of the Good Fortune, which in Caravaggio and his followers is mostly placed as a lively and piquant model where usually while one gypsy reads the hand to an unlearned youth, another deftly makes the latter's purse disappear. Pietro della Vecchia, the author of our work, dedicated several canvases to this subject, identifying in a male figure the interpreter of the fortune teller, like the version preserved in the Museo Civico in Vicenza. Another interpretation of the subject is proposed when the allegorical meaning that the artist imparts to the scene is prevalent, as is given to see in the present canvas. Here a man in shining armor is intent on having his hand read by an old scholar paluded by a red robe and cap of the same color. On his nose the elderly sage wears a pair of spectacles; in his left hand he holds a compass with which to measure the lines of fate and fortune that intersect the knight's hand. Ponderous tomes and paper scrolls attest to the old fortune teller's degree of wisdom. On the right side of the composition looms an old woman holding a skull in her hand, and beside her appears the figure of a young boy. In addition to a conventional depiction of a fortune teller intent on reading the palm, the painting could also be defined as an allegory of the age of man, with the fortune teller foreshadowing man's destiny but also the past (the old woman) and the future (the youth). As far as the stylistic aspect is concerned, we are faced with a skillful pastiche by Muttoni, one of those works that earned him the nickname of "Giorgione's ghost," as has been sharply pointed out recently (E. M. Dal Pozzolo, 2011). If the man in armor reveals precise similarities with the warrior of the Reading of the Hand preserved in the British Optical Association Museum in London (canvas datable to around 1640), which presents the same posture of the right arm bent at right angles with the metal of the armor traversed by flashes of light, the Giorgionesque suggestion that permeates the work is evident, one thinks, in this regard, of the Halberdier of the Kunshistorisches Museum in Vienna. Not meditating on Giorgione's texts but almost copying, on the other hand, is the old woman taken verbatim from Giorgione's famous, Vecchia (Venice, Gallerie dell'Accademia). Overt remakes that reaffirm the fascination suffered by the . Vecchia vis-à-vis Giorgione but able to offer, i nonetheless, details of exquisite workmanship, above all the sword that hangs at the side of the armed man, elegantly knotted with precious and refined taste in detail." Wt. 127 - Ht. 101.6 Cm oil on canvas Private collection, Pordenone Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 42-43 "The work being investigated here connects at least in part to a theme that began with Michelangelo Merisi and later spread throughout Europe thanks to the works expected by the ranks of Italian and foreign Caravaggisti. The subject is that of the Good Fortune, which in Caravaggio and his followers is mostly placed as a lively and piquant model where usually while one gypsy reads the hand to an unlearned youth, another deftly makes the latter's purse disappear. Pietro della Vecchia, the author of our work, dedicated several canvases to this subject, identifying in a male figure the interpreter of the fortune teller, like the version preserved in the Museo Civico in Vicenza. Another interpretation of the subject is proposed when the allegorical meaning that the artist imparts to the scene is prevalent, as is given to see in the present canvas. Here a man in shining armor is intent on having his hand read by an old scholar paled by a red robe and cap of the same color. On his nose the elderly sage wears a pair of spectacles; in his left hand he holds a compass with which to measure the lines of fate and fortune that intersect the knight's hand. Ponderous tomes and paper scrolls attest to the old fortune teller's degree of wisdom. On the right side of the composition looms an old woman holding a skull in her hand, and beside her appears the figure of a young boy. In addition to a conventional depiction of a fortune teller intent on reading the palm, the painting could also be defined as an allegory of the age of man, with the fortune teller foreshadowing man's destiny but also the past (the old woman) and the future (the youth). As far as the stylistic aspect is concerned, we are dealing with a skillful pastiche by Muttoni, one of those works that the

Estim. 18,000 - 24,000 EUR

Alessandro Varotari 1588 Padova-1649 Venezia - The Awakening of Venus "Correctly likened by Ruggeri to a Titian prototype discernible in the Sleeping Venus in the Gemäldegalerie in Dresden, the present work matches a canvas of the same theme, but of larger dimensions, owned by the Cassa di Risparmio di Padova (Ruggeri, 1988, p. 112). In the merry strumming of a host of putti the goddess of love awakens, exhibiting without any modesty the beauty of her own naked form. In her posture we discern concordances with other works of similar genre expected by Varotari such as Venus in a Landscape in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Grenoble and the same subject existing in Ca' Vendramin Calergi in Venice. Clear references to our canvas are similarly noted in the Venus protagonist with Mars and Cupid of a canvas preserved in the Uffizi in Florence. Venus awakens, as mentioned, amid the cheerful playing of putti; in the upper left corner the firmament is brightened by the sunrise. A red drape encloses the scene to the right with purpose as a backdrop. Venus, at whose feet are abandoned some banners symbolic of a war subdued to the force of that love which is her evident prerogative, alludes with the raised forefinger of her right hand to the blossoming of a new day. Undoubted is the Titianesque matrix of the painting, a faithful reinterpretation of the great Cadore artist's youthful production, in an apodictic reinterpretation of a classicist matrix by Varotari on those mythological-campestrian texts proper to the lagoon figurative renaissance. The Venus's compact nudity and glazed colors suggest a dating to the early years of the third decade of the seventeenth century, at a time when Padovanino's intentions were very strong in re-proposing the bacchanals of still fresh Giorgion-Titianesque memory." W. 107 - H. 62 Cm oil on canvas Private collection, Pordenone Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 34-35 Reference bibliography: U. Ruggeri, Il Padovanino, in "Saggi e Memorie di Storia dell'Arte," 16, 1988, p. 112 The work is in more than good conservation/aesthetic condition. Lined. Observation with Wood's lamp revealed no major defects except for some minor color retouching, concentrated in the sky part and on the body of Venus. In order. "Correctly juxtaposed by Ruggeri with a Titian prototype discernible in the Sleeping Venus in the Gemäldegalerie in Dresden, the present work matches a canvas of identical theme, but of larger size, owned by the Cassa di Risparmio di Padova (Ruggeri, 1988, p. 112). In the merry strumming of a host of putti the goddess of love awakens, exhibiting without any modesty the beauty of her own naked form. In her posture we discern concordances with other works of similar genre expected by Varotari such as Venus in a Landscape in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Grenoble and the same subject existing in Ca' Vendramin Calergi in Venice. Clear references to our canvas are similarly noted in the Venus protagonist with Mars and Cupid of a canvas preserved in the Uffizi in Florence. Venus awakens, as mentioned, amid the cheerful playing of putti; in the upper left corner the firmament is brightened by the sunrise. A red drape encloses the scene to the right with purpose as a backdrop. Venus, at whose feet are abandoned some banners symbolic of a war subdued to the force of that love which is her evident prerogative, alludes with the raised forefinger of her right hand to the blossoming of a new day. Undoubted is the Titianesque matrix of the painting, a faithful reinterpretation of the great Cadore artist's youthful production, in an apodictic reinterpretation of a classicist matrix by Varotari on those mythological-campestrian texts proper to the lagoon figurative renaissance. The Venus's compact nudity and enameled colors suggest a dating to the early years of the third decade of the seventeenth century, at the time when Padovanino's intentions were very strong in re-proposing the bacchanals of still fresh Giorgion-Titianesque memory." https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fo/ru1uddrpcy7gguctqczuk/AFPDvkKqAe4u037XVJommqw?rlkey=3lcoalstf053csv6l2qa5t44a&st=w9r7oiml&dl=0

Estim. 8,000 - 12,000 EUR

Antonio Zanchi 1631 Este-1722 Venezia - Shipwreck of Agrippina "Coming from the Luis Liceti collection in Miraflores (Lima, Peru), The painting has been dated by Riccoboni to approximately 1680. The canvas, of which another version is known to have been kept since 1780 in the Liechtenstein Palace in Vienna and from there alienated in 1880 and perhaps to be identified with the one that appeared in 1945 in the Roman antiquarian market, stands out for its strong chiaroscuro score. It is a successful dialogue between dark areas and irradiations of light that fringe the limbs of the protagonists. Shadows and brown and reddish tones among flashes of light are the tonal elements that give the scene an effective pathos. The agitated rescue of Agrippina, made possible by the herculean figure that lifts the woman up, placing her in safety, asserts itself as pertinent evidence of that dark pictoricism that in Venice elaborated in an undoubtedly autonomous and original way the dictates of Caravaggio and of which Zanchi was among the first and most gifted artificers. Siffatto subject, perhaps executed by the painter of Este after having seen the analogous theme, put in place by Johann Carl Loth (Munich, Alte Pinakothek), fits well into the programmatic dictates proper to the tenebrosi, aimed at an affirmation of models pervaded with tragic sense, accentuated emotional tension and powerful chiaroscuro distribution." W. 160 - H. 157 Cm oil on canvas Private collection, Pordenone Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 82-83 "Coming from the Luis Liceti collection in Miraflores (Lima, Peru), The painting has been dated by Riccoboni to approximately 1680. The canvas, of which another version is known to have been kept since 1780 in the Liechtenstein Palace in Vienna and from there alienated in 1880 and perhaps to be identified with the one that appeared in 1945 in the Roman antiquarian market, stands out for its strong chiaroscuro score. It is a successful dialogue between dark areas and irradiations of light that fringe the limbs of the protagonists. Shadows and brown and reddish tones among flashes of light are the tonal elements that give the scene an effective pathos. The agitated rescue of Agrippina, made possible by the herculean figure that lifts the woman up, placing her in safety, asserts itself as pertinent evidence of that dark pictoricism that in Venice elaborated in an undoubtedly autonomous and original way the dictates of Caravaggio and of which Zanchi was among the first and most gifted artificers. Siffatto subject, perhaps executed by the painter of Este after having seen the analogous theme, put in place by Johann Carl Loth (Munich, Alte Pinakothek), fits well into the programmatic dictates proper to the tenebrosi, aimed at an affirmation of models pervaded with tragic sense, accentuated emotional tension and powerful chiaroscuro division."

Estim. 18,000 - 24,000 EUR

Ludovico Carracci 1555 Bologna-1619 Bologna - Assumption of the Virgin bears ancient inscription on the back: "Caracci" "The beautiful painting on copper and depicting the Assumption of the Virgin, appears with reasonable certainty to be the work of the hand of Ludovico Carracci (Bologna, 1555-1619), and that is, of the oldest of the artists of that surname, elder cousin of Agostino and Annibale. The fine work is executed with extraordinary quality of inspiration and hand, and finds suitable comparisons in some other works by Ludovico Carracci. Most of these handheld comparisons are in the years between the Piacenza Cathedral frescoes (1609-10) and the beautiful altarpiece with Saints Bear and Eusebius, signed and dated 1613, which is on the high altar of the cathedral in Fano, Marche. This is a season of inspiration now ripe in the sense of a tendency toward 'Baroque' language but of northern - and that is, Bolognese Po valley - style and character rather than of a later Roman nature: and that is, derived from the advanced work of Annibale Carracci. (...) Ludovico's contiguity with concomitant or predecessor characters, from Pordenone to Camillo Procaccini, may explain much of the growing language that recovers, as in this case very visibly, a debate with Correggio's domes in Parma. (...)" Prof. Andrea Emiliani W. 31 - H. 38 cm oil on copper Expertises Prof. Andrea Emiliani and Prof. Emilio Negro Private collection, Milan The work is in good conservative/aesthetic condition. Presence of a small color drop and old nail holes near the edges. Observation with Wood's lamp did not reveal the presence of major defects except for some small color falls reintegrated scattered on the surface of the work. In order. "The beautiful painting on copper and depicting the Assumption of the Virgin, appears with reasonable certainty to be the work of the hand of Ludovico Carracci (Bologna, 1555-1619), and that is, of the oldest of the artists of that surname, elder cousin of Agostino and Annibale. The fine work is executed with extraordinary quality of inspiration and hand, and finds suitable comparisons in some other works by Ludovico Carracci. Most of these handheld comparisons are in the years between the Piacenza Cathedral frescoes (1609-10) and the beautiful altarpiece with Saints Bear and Eusebius, signed and dated 1613, which is on the high altar of the cathedral in Fano, Marche. This is a season of inspiration now ripe in the sense of a tendency toward 'Baroque' language but of northern - and that is, Bolognese Po valley - style and character rather than of a later Roman nature: and that is, derived from the advanced work of Annibale Carracci. (...) Ludovico's contiguity with concomitant or predecessor characters, from Pordenone to Camillo Procaccini, may explain much of the growing language that recovers, as in this case very visibly, a debate with Correggio's domes in Parma. (...)" Prof. Andrea Emiliani https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fo/q2jqhm3edm703heeqhoy8/AI9M-LC2lsEJCoHVb2FyLQE?rlkey=mzlwhitwxk34pcmmytcawhgre&st=nk10w1wo&dl=0

Estim. 20,000 - 30,000 EUR

Luca Giordano 1634 Napoli -1705 Napoli - Portrait of Aristotle "During the seventeenth century, in the grim contingencies of daily living marked by wars, pestilence and famine, the need to look to existential ideals capable of providing useful comparisons with the contemporary thus marking its contradictions and withholding from the ancient world examples of uplifting and heroic living was becoming established. Characters from ancient history and philosophers became tangible examples for a better life, whether contemplative, heroic or penitential, to the detriment of a very complex and in some ways tragic reality. In the figurative arts, too, such a search for ideals to yearn for became a source of fruitful inspiration. Among the multitude of eminent thinkers of the classical world portrayed in the Baroque age, a place of certain prominence is held by those expressed by Luca Giordano. He frequently made use of the poor humanity that crowded the streets of Spanish Naples, where the physiognomic features marked by hardships of all kinds were well suited to the ideal faces of those Stylites and Stoics well present in the history of ancient thought, in order to give features to the great philosophers of antiquity. In these works created by the Neapolitan painter, moreover, the acquired suggestions for similar subjects expressed by Ribera are well manifest. Various are the ideal portraits Giordano dedicated to Aristotle. The father of syllogism was portrayed by the painter in various replicas. One version was recently sold first in an auction at the Antonina (Rome, March 28, 2011 and May 22, 2011, lot 875) and then at the Dorotheum (Vienna, Oct. 12, 2011, lot 451) paired with a Democritus. The depiction of Aristotle was inferred from the inscription, in block letters but not clearly legible, at the top right of the painting. Further evidence that this is the philosopher of Stagira is also inferred from the phrase that stands out in the middle of the book he holds in his hands: 'THE KNOWLEDGE IN ADVERSITY IS REFUGGIO@@ IN PROSPERITY ORNAMENTO,' an assertion taken from the Ethics to Nicomachus. Such significant identifying details make it possible with good confidence to reveal the iconography of the canvas presented here. Our painting palpably re-proposes the philosopher equal to the exemplar described above except for the remembered phrase placed inside the volume he holds in his hand. The painting seems identifiable with the one in Federico Zeri's photographic archive (card 52792, envelope 0521) believed to be of unknown location, despite very slight differences in size perhaps justifiable by the folding of the edges of the present canvas. Also in the Zeri archives is another photographic reproduction of the same subject, here however smaller in size and at the time of the filing in the possession of a Milanese collection (card 54815, envelope 0521). The canvas exhibited here is particularly appreciable for its skillful use of color, which, through a kind of volumetric construction, unfolds on warm and substantial tones. Aristotle is portrayed in the act of pointing an eventual viewer to one of his treatises, cast in a riberesque atmosphere, where calls of light dialogue with shadows in an effective and vigorous chiaroscuro rendering." W. 84 - H. 116 Cm oil on canvas Private collection, Pordenone Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 66-67 "During the seventeenth century, in the harsh contingencies of daily living marked by wars, pestilence and famine, the need to look at existential ideals capable of providing useful comparison with the contemporary thus marking its contradictions and withholding from the ancient world examples of uplifting and heroic life was asserting itself. Characters from ancient history and philosophers became tangible examples for a better life, whether contemplative, heroic or penitential, to the detriment of a very complex and in some ways tragic reality. In the figurative arts, too, such a search for ideals to yearn for became a source of fruitful inspiration. Among the multitude of eminent thinkers of the classical world portrayed in the Baroque age, a place of certain prominence is held by those expressed by Luca Giordano. He frequently made use of the poor humanity that crowded the streets of Spanish Naples, where the physiognomic features marked by hardships of all kinds were well suited to the ideal faces of those Stylites and Stoics well present in the history of ancient thought, in order to give features to the great philosophers of antiquity. In these works created by the Neapolitan painter, moreover, the acquired suggestions for similar subjects expressed by Ribera are well manifest. Various are the ideal portraits Giordano dedicated to Aristotle. The father of syllogism was portrayed by the painter in various replicas. One version was beaten recently dapprim

Estim. 18,000 - 24,000 EUR

Alessandro Varotari 1588 Padova-1649 Venezia - La Purezza "Certified by a private writing of Giuseppe Fiocco dated February 20, 1970 with pertinent attribution of the two paintings to Padovanino, the ovals depicting La Purezza and La Lussuria, have been placed by the scholar in the period of the artist's full maturity, at the time when Varotari distinguished himself for his decisive and lively use of color and the adoption of a marked luminism of anti-Manierist value. Purity is personified here by an angelic creature of great beauty holding in her right hand a lily, a flower symbolic of virtue, clad in a fluttering cloak and possessing a pair of wings that mark the canvas' horizon. Behind Purity, whose figure occupies almost the entire oval, is portrayed a putto looking in the other direction. The depiction of Lust contains within itself all the iconographic elements pertaining to her. Frequently, in fact, Lust, included among the seven Deadly Sins, is depicted in the act of embracing a male figure. In the painting in question this figure possesses rabbit ears, and such an animal according to humanistic tradition was celebrated for fecundity and sensual gratification. The pile of coins glimpsed under the robe of Lust is another element connected to enjoyment and debauchery. A putto, perhaps Cupid, peeps out behind the couple. Undoubted is the work's Classical matrix, confirming Varotari's full adherence to the great Venetian Renaissance, mainly in the figurative texts of Giorgione, Titian and Veronese. The colors, deployed on the ranges of pinks, reds and blues, give the painting an elegiac tone, perfectly in tune with the artist's classicist intentions." W. 94 - H. 120 Cm oil on oval canvas Expertise Dr. Giuseppe Fiocco (1970) Private collection, Pordenone Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 28-29 "Certified by a private writing of Giuseppe Fiocco dated February 20, 1970 with pertinent attribution of the two paintings to Padovanino, the ovals depicting La Purezza (Purity) and La Lussuria (Lust), have been placed by the scholar in the period of the artist's full maturity, at the time when Varotari distinguished himself for his decisive and lively use of color and the adoption of a marked luminism of anti-Manierist value. Purity is personified here by an angelic creature of great beauty holding in her right hand a lily, a flower symbolic of virtue, clad in a fluttering cloak and possessing a pair of wings that mark the canvas' horizon. Behind Purity, whose figure occupies almost the entire oval, is portrayed a putto looking in the other direction. The depiction of Lust contains within itself all the iconographic elements pertaining to her. Frequently, in fact, Lust, included among the seven Deadly Sins, is depicted in the act of embracing a male figure. In the painting in question this figure possesses rabbit ears, and such an animal according to humanistic tradition was celebrated for fecundity and sensual gratification. The pile of coins glimpsed under the robe of Lust is another element connected to enjoyment and debauchery. A putto, perhaps Cupid, peeps out behind the couple. Undoubted is the work's Classical matrix, confirming Varotari's full adherence to the great Venetian Renaissance, mainly in the figurative texts of Giorgione, Titian and Veronese. The colors, deployed on the ranges of pinks, reds and blues, give the painting an elegiac tone, perfectly in tune with the artist's classicist intentions."

Estim. 8,000 - 12,000 EUR

Johann Carl Loth 1632 Monaco di Baviera-1698 Venezia - The Return of the Prodigal Son "Carl Loth depicted the most significant moment in the parable of the prodigal son, when the runaway son returned repentant to his father, who welcomes him festively , making him wear the finest clothes. The Gospel theme was reiterated several times by the Bavarian painter, there are in fact, in addition to several replicas cited in the sources in Pommerfelden, in Braunschweig Castle in Salzburg, an oval-shaped redaction in the Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum in Braunschweig, a significant version in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg and another mirror one in the Staatliche Gemäldesammlungen in Kassel. Differing in only a few details from the Kassel translation, also substantially repeating its measurements, is a painting formerly in a private collection in Frankfurt am Main and presented here. The painting, which in the Venice of the time finds illustrious iconographic precedent in Guercino's canvas purchased in 1651 by collector Giovanni Nani, stands out as a typical work of the German painter's maturity. It is a Loth now freed from typically gloomy scans and, rather, participating in the Cortonesque poetics that would lead him to promote that Baroque taste that through his pupils would renew Austrian and German painting. The scene, which is connoted by the cadenced postures of the characters, is certainly impressive. Indicative features of quality are also grasped in the rendering of details, such as, among others, the beauty of the feathered headdress that encircles the head of the prodigal son and the flower that is brought to him by the young servant." Wd. 165 - H. 116 Cm oil on canvas Private collection, Pordenone Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 92-93 "Carl Loth depicted the most significant moment in the parable of the prodigal son, when the runaway son returned repentant to his father who welcomes him festively , making him wear the finest clothes. The Gospel theme was reiterated several times by the Bavarian painter, there are in fact, in addition to several replicas cited in the sources in Pommerfelden, in Braunschweig Castle in Salzburg, an oval-shaped redaction in the Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum in Braunschweig, a significant version in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg and another mirror one in the Staatliche Gemäldesammlungen in Kassel. Differing in only a few details from the Kassel translation, also substantially repeating its measurements, is a painting formerly in a private collection in Frankfurt am Main and presented here. The painting, which in the Venice of the time finds illustrious iconographic precedent in Guercino's canvas purchased in 1651 by collector Giovanni Nani, stands out as a typical work of the German painter's maturity. It is a Loth now freed from typically gloomy scans and, rather, participating in the Cortonesque poetics that would lead him to promote that Baroque taste that through his pupils would renew Austrian and German painting. The scene, which is connoted by the cadenced postures of the characters, is certainly impressive. Indicative features of quality are also grasped in the rendering of details, such as, among others, the beauty of the feathered headdress that encircles the head of the prodigal son and the flower that is brought to him by the young servant."

Estim. 12,000 - 18,000 EUR

Johann Carl Loth 1632 Monaco di Baviera-1698 Venezia - Inebriation of Noah "This subject, much in vogue between the Renaissance and Baroque periods, was frequently transposed outdoors with the naked body of Noah lying under the arbor of his vineyard. The patriarch's naked limbs were repeatedly portrayed by Johann Carl Loth, an artist certainly versed in the depiction of male nudes. In the Bavarian painter's catalog, the theme of Noah's intoxication counts several versions. The best known are preserved in the Alte Pinakothek in Munich and in the Museo Civico in Bolzano. A small painting with a similar subject is mentioned in 1793 in the Palazzo Casilini in Rovigo, "A Sleeping Noah by Charles Lot" turns out to be in the possession of Alvise Morosini in Venice in 1756, and another painting with Noah and his family is remembered as existing in 1779 in the Palazzo Trivulzio in Milan. Prototype of the series is undoubtedly the version existing in Germany, where a grazing light, as warned by Pallucchini, illuminates Cam's face and hands and then spreads over the naked body of his father, whose head of Langettian ancestry is also admired. Replica of this canvas is the redaction that is preserved in Bolzano, which differs, substantially, in the features of Sem and lasef. The work in question relates directly to the Munich model of which it also repeats in full the features of Cam's brothers. From the two versions held in the aforementioned museum collections, ours differs, rather, in the anatomical rendering of Noah's lying limbs. It does not, in fact, achieve its meticulous muscular rendering but, rather, presents a more rounded form. The chromatics, played on reddish and greenish tones, seem to anticipate the coming manners of Giambattista Piazzetta whose youthful discipleship at Antonio Molinari should be mentioned, who, in fact, was considered an epigone of those dark painters, and thus also of Loth, who had animated the Venetian proscenium in the second half of the 17th century." W. 173 - H. 143 Cm oil on canvas Private collection, Pordenone Pittura barocca veneta in una collezione privata, edited by S. Aloisi, Treviso, 2012, pp. 94-95 "This subject, much in vogue between the Renaissance and Baroque periods, was frequently transposed outdoors with the naked body of Noah lying under the arbor of his vineyard. The patriarch's naked limbs were repeatedly portrayed by Johann Carl Loth, an artist certainly versed in the depiction of male nudes. In the Bavarian painter's catalog, the theme of Noah's intoxication counts several versions. The best known are preserved in the Alte Pinakothek in Munich and in the Museo Civico in Bolzano. A small painting with a similar subject is mentioned in 1793 in the Palazzo Casilini in Rovigo, "A Sleeping Noah by Charles Lot" turns out to be in the possession of Alvise Morosini in Venice in 1756, and another painting with Noah and his family is remembered as existing in 1779 in the Palazzo Trivulzio in Milan. Prototype of the series is undoubtedly the version existing in Germany, where a grazing light, as warned by Pallucchini, illuminates Cam's face and hands and then spreads over the naked body of his father, whose head of Langettian ancestry is also admired. Replica of this canvas is the redaction that is preserved in Bolzano, which differs, substantially, in the features of Sem and lasef. The work in question relates directly to the Munich model of which it also repeats in full the features of Cam's brothers. From the two versions held in the aforementioned museum collections, ours differs, rather, in the anatomical rendering of Noah's lying limbs. It does not, in fact, achieve its meticulous muscular rendering but, rather, presents a more rounded form. The chromatics, played on reddish and greenish tones, seem to anticipate the coming manners of Giambattista Piazzetta whose youthful discipleship with Antonio Molinari should be mentioned, who, in fact, was considered an epigone of those dark painters, and thus also of Loth, who had animated the Venetian proscenium in the second half of the seventeenth century."

Estim. 18,000 - 24,000 EUR