Null LIN Fengmian (Lin Fongmin) (1900-1991)
Beautiful lady, early 1950s
Ink, gou…
Description

LIN Fengmian (Lin Fongmin) (1900-1991) Beautiful lady, early 1950s Ink, gouache on Xuan paper. 66 x 66 cm Slightly cut at the top. Provenance: According to the owner, acquired directly from the artist in the 1950s. Exhibition: Chinese Artists in Paris, September 9 - December 31, 2011, Musée Cernuschi. Reproduced in catalog, p. 36. The painting depicts a stylized female figure seated in the center. Her features are simplified and her limbs elongated, rendered in shades of white and green. The background is divided into dark vertical sections. Signed and stamped upper left. This subject is recurrent in Lin Fengmian's work and considered by specialists to be a reminiscence of his mother, from whom he was separated at an early age in difficult circumstances. The type of paper used by Lin Fengmian during the war, when he couldn't paint on canvas, was called 宣紙 (xuān zhǐ), also known as xuan paper. It's a fine, absorbent paper made from mulberry fibers, traditionally used for Chinese calligraphy and painting. Xuanzhi is prized for its resistance to ink and its ability to capture the subtle nuances of brushstrokes. Its smooth, uniform surface was ideal for Lin Fengmian's style of painting, which emphasized fluid lines and soft colors. What's more, xuanzhi was relatively inexpensive and easy to find, making it a practical choice for Lin Fengmian during the wartime period of economic hardship. Lin Fengmian, a major Chinese artist of the 20th century, shaped his country's art history by fusing the influences of European modernity with traditional Chinese artistic heritage. Born into a family of poor artisans in 1900 in Guangdong province, he overcame financial obstacles through determination and unexpected good fortune, winning the lottery to study in France. In Paris, he trained at the École Nationale des Beaux-Arts after a spell at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Dijon, and discovered a vibrant Franco-Chinese artistic community. Back in China, he became a key figure in artistic reform, promoting modern art and fusing Chinese and Western techniques. As director of the National Art School in Beijing, he played a key role in promoting contemporary art. However, political upheaval and social instability forced him to leave Beijing in 1927, but he found refuge in Hangzhou, where he founded the National Academy of Arts. World War II and the Chinese Cultural Revolution marked tumultuous times for Lin Fengmian. Forced underground and forced to destroy his own works during the Cultural Revolution, he was imprisoned as an "enemy of the people". After his release, he lived in precarious conditions until his departure for Hong Kong in 1977. Despite his ordeal, Lin Fengmian continued to create and to commit himself to preserving his artistic heritage. He died in Hong Kong in 1991, leaving behind a remarkable artistic legacy and a lasting influence on modern Chinese art.

LIN Fengmian (Lin Fongmin) (1900-1991) Beautiful lady, early 1950s Ink, gouache on Xuan paper. 66 x 66 cm Slightly cut at the top. Provenance: According to the owner, acquired directly from the artist in the 1950s. Exhibition: Chinese Artists in Paris, September 9 - December 31, 2011, Musée Cernuschi. Reproduced in catalog, p. 36. The painting depicts a stylized female figure seated in the center. Her features are simplified and her limbs elongated, rendered in shades of white and green. The background is divided into dark vertical sections. Signed and stamped upper left. This subject is recurrent in Lin Fengmian's work and considered by specialists to be a reminiscence of his mother, from whom he was separated at an early age in difficult circumstances. The type of paper used by Lin Fengmian during the war, when he couldn't paint on canvas, was called 宣紙 (xuān zhǐ), also known as xuan paper. It's a fine, absorbent paper made from mulberry fibers, traditionally used for Chinese calligraphy and painting. Xuanzhi is prized for its resistance to ink and its ability to capture the subtle nuances of brushstrokes. Its smooth, uniform surface was ideal for Lin Fengmian's style of painting, which emphasized fluid lines and soft colors. What's more, xuanzhi was relatively inexpensive and easy to find, making it a practical choice for Lin Fengmian during the wartime period of economic hardship. Lin Fengmian, a major Chinese artist of the 20th century, shaped his country's art history by fusing the influences of European modernity with traditional Chinese artistic heritage. Born into a family of poor artisans in 1900 in Guangdong province, he overcame financial obstacles through determination and unexpected good fortune, winning the lottery to study in France. In Paris, he trained at the École Nationale des Beaux-Arts after a spell at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Dijon, and discovered a vibrant Franco-Chinese artistic community. Back in China, he became a key figure in artistic reform, promoting modern art and fusing Chinese and Western techniques. As director of the National Art School in Beijing, he played a key role in promoting contemporary art. However, political upheaval and social instability forced him to leave Beijing in 1927, but he found refuge in Hangzhou, where he founded the National Academy of Arts. World War II and the Chinese Cultural Revolution marked tumultuous times for Lin Fengmian. Forced underground and forced to destroy his own works during the Cultural Revolution, he was imprisoned as an "enemy of the people". After his release, he lived in precarious conditions until his departure for Hong Kong in 1977. Despite his ordeal, Lin Fengmian continued to create and to commit himself to preserving his artistic heritage. He died in Hong Kong in 1991, leaving behind a remarkable artistic legacy and a lasting influence on modern Chinese art.

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LIN FENGMIAN (1900-1991) Market scene, fishmongers Ink and gouache on paper Signed lower left, above a red stamp. Size: 33.3 x 33.3 cm With cream damask silk border; framed under glass. Condition: Freckling and slight yellowing of silk and paper; damp stain at the top, especially on the silk, but somewhat biting on the painting. Provenance: Lyon family, for several years. The scene, painted in predominantly blue, mauve and beige pastel hues, depicts three women at a table, one cleaning fish. To her right, another woman provides fish, dipping her hand into a basket held by the third. In the foreground, in front of the table, three large baskets of fish, two still full, the one on the left, next to the third woman, empty. Lin Fengmian had recurring themes that he depicted more often than others, such as these evanescent female figures or Peking opera characters. Scenes of everyday life are rarer in the artist's work, but in this painting, we find the lively movement conferred by lively brushstrokes and rounded shapes, such as baskets and arms. About the artist : LIN FENGMIAN is one of those painters on whom the West in general, and France in particular, will have a major impact, which they will then transmit to China, upsetting ancestral references and traditions. Like a number of his compatriots, in 1918 he had the opportunity to go to France as part of a study program. He was one of the pioneers, along with Xu Beihong. Lin Fengmian stayed in France until 1925, first in Dijon, then in Paris, where he studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. From then on, he was constantly striving to marry the Chinese artistic tradition with that of the West. On his return to China, he taught, first at the National Academy of Art in Beijing, then at the Hangzhou Academy of Art, of which he was director in both cases. Here, he taught what he had absorbed in the West, thus initiating, along with other contemporary artists also influenced by Western art, a profound break with Chinese artistic traditions, and playing a major role in the reform of art education in China. His pupils included Zao Wuki, Zhu Dechun and Wu Guanzhong, who in turn travelled to France, becoming as famous as the master. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, his work was heavily criticized by the authorities. He was even imprisoned for 4 years. He eventually left China and settled in Hong Kong in 1977, while continuing to travel the world.