Null Gerardo MURILLO, known as Dr. ATL (1875-1964)
Volcanes, XX Estenciles - Vol…
Description

Gerardo MURILLO, known as Dr. ATL (1875-1964) Volcanes, XX Estenciles - Vol. I, 1928 SET OF EIGHTEEN monogrammed stencils, in sheets in folders or framed, depicting volcanic landscapes. Each stencil monogrammed. The folder is monogrammed and numbered 8.2 in ink. Overall frame: 158 x 87 cm - Stencil: 25 x 26 cm (when viewed) Sheets: 49 x 31 cm Gerardo MURILLO, known as Dr. ATL (1875-1964), was a precursor of Mexican muralism. Appointed Director of the Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City in 1914, he advocated a break with the teaching of the Barbizon school, then prevalent in Mexico. His teaching was based on the social aspect of art and its mix with politics. For Murillo, the artist must be "the political instrument of revolutionary propaganda". Naturally, he was a great influence on the trinity of Mexican muralism: Diego Rivera, Juan Clemente Orozco and David Alfonso Siquieros. Alongside this political activism, he was also passionate about nature and volcanoes. His major work Cómo nace y crece un volcán, el Paricutín (1950) shows how the volcano was a powerful image for the artist, and the fruit of a passion that would lead to his downfall. The originality and rarity of these stencils lies in the fact that they were produced very early in the artist's career. They are probably part of a series of works produced in the early 1920s, depicting the picturesque and popular life of post-revolutionary Mexico. Diego Rivera began painting his Epic of the Mexican People in 1929.

79 

Gerardo MURILLO, known as Dr. ATL (1875-1964) Volcanes, XX Estenciles - Vol. I, 1928 SET OF EIGHTEEN monogrammed stencils, in sheets in folders or framed, depicting volcanic landscapes. Each stencil monogrammed. The folder is monogrammed and numbered 8.2 in ink. Overall frame: 158 x 87 cm - Stencil: 25 x 26 cm (when viewed) Sheets: 49 x 31 cm Gerardo MURILLO, known as Dr. ATL (1875-1964), was a precursor of Mexican muralism. Appointed Director of the Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City in 1914, he advocated a break with the teaching of the Barbizon school, then prevalent in Mexico. His teaching was based on the social aspect of art and its mix with politics. For Murillo, the artist must be "the political instrument of revolutionary propaganda". Naturally, he was a great influence on the trinity of Mexican muralism: Diego Rivera, Juan Clemente Orozco and David Alfonso Siquieros. Alongside this political activism, he was also passionate about nature and volcanoes. His major work Cómo nace y crece un volcán, el Paricutín (1950) shows how the volcano was a powerful image for the artist, and the fruit of a passion that would lead to his downfall. The originality and rarity of these stencils lies in the fact that they were produced very early in the artist's career. They are probably part of a series of works produced in the early 1920s, depicting the picturesque and popular life of post-revolutionary Mexico. Diego Rivera began painting his Epic of the Mexican People in 1929.

Auction is over for this lot. See the results