Null A CARVED WOOD DANCE MASK ''HUDOQ''
Indonesia, Borneo / Kalimantan East-, Ka…
Description

A CARVED WOOD DANCE MASK ''HUDOQ'' Indonesia, Borneo / Kalimantan East-, Kajan- or Bahau-Dayak, early 20th c. H. ca, 39 cm This hudoq mask represents a forest demon as a hostile warrior with ear stakes. The eyes are made of mirror glass to ward off the evil spirits that turn away at the sight of their own face. The mask, made of light wood withe is painted red and black. The nostrils and lips are highlighted in red and the aso motif can be recognised on the chin. The aso motif was mainly reserved for successful warriors; it is also the skin motif on the famous Dayak tattoos. Masks of this type, called hudo or hudoq, are typical of the traditional Dayak cultures of Borneo. They are used at the Dayak gawaii (harvest festivals). However, hudoq masks are also worn at numerous other performances, festivals and ceremonies, and their use varies from region to region. In West Borneo, they are also worn at wedding ceremonies and circumcisions. Basically, their purpose is always to chase away ominous spirits. Among the Kajan and Kenyah (to whom this mask belongs), they are mainly associated with rice festivals; in South Borneo, the area of the Ngadju-Dayak, they are also worn at burial ceremonies. These masks were always worn by male dancers. As additional clothing, banana leaves are cut into strips and made into cloaks that conceal the identity of the dancers. The Dayak are the indigenous people of Borneo. The Dayak include dozens of different ethnic groups, some of which differ greatly from one another in terms of language, culture and way of life. The term Dayak probably comes from the Malay word daya, which means ‘arrived’, in memory of the former immigration of these groups before the turn of time (the actual indigenous population is represented in small numbers by the Punan, for example). The settlement areas of the Dayak cover the entire island of Borneo and are therefore located in the territory of the three states of Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. The Dayak belong to the Austronesian peoples who, coming from the South China region, colonised Southeast Asia from the middle of the 3rd millennium BC. Most Dayak ethnic groups speak their own languages, but they all belong to the Malayo-Polynesian branch of the Austronesian language family. From an old German private collection, assembled since the 1950s - Minor traces of age, partly slightly chipped, headdress lost Lit.: Ave, J. B. / King, V. (1986): People of the Weeping Forest. Tradition and Change in Borneo. Leiden. - Hein, A.R. (1895): Zur Entwicklungsgeschichte des Ornamentes bei den Dayaks. Wien - Sellato, B. (1992): Hornbill and Dragon. Arts and Culture of Borneo. Sun Tree Publishing. - Taylor, P. M. / Aragon, L. V. (1990): Beyond The Java Sea. Arts of Indonesia`s Outer Islands. New York.

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A CARVED WOOD DANCE MASK ''HUDOQ'' Indonesia, Borneo / Kalimantan East-, Kajan- or Bahau-Dayak, early 20th c. H. ca, 39 cm This hudoq mask represents a forest demon as a hostile warrior with ear stakes. The eyes are made of mirror glass to ward off the evil spirits that turn away at the sight of their own face. The mask, made of light wood withe is painted red and black. The nostrils and lips are highlighted in red and the aso motif can be recognised on the chin. The aso motif was mainly reserved for successful warriors; it is also the skin motif on the famous Dayak tattoos. Masks of this type, called hudo or hudoq, are typical of the traditional Dayak cultures of Borneo. They are used at the Dayak gawaii (harvest festivals). However, hudoq masks are also worn at numerous other performances, festivals and ceremonies, and their use varies from region to region. In West Borneo, they are also worn at wedding ceremonies and circumcisions. Basically, their purpose is always to chase away ominous spirits. Among the Kajan and Kenyah (to whom this mask belongs), they are mainly associated with rice festivals; in South Borneo, the area of the Ngadju-Dayak, they are also worn at burial ceremonies. These masks were always worn by male dancers. As additional clothing, banana leaves are cut into strips and made into cloaks that conceal the identity of the dancers. The Dayak are the indigenous people of Borneo. The Dayak include dozens of different ethnic groups, some of which differ greatly from one another in terms of language, culture and way of life. The term Dayak probably comes from the Malay word daya, which means ‘arrived’, in memory of the former immigration of these groups before the turn of time (the actual indigenous population is represented in small numbers by the Punan, for example). The settlement areas of the Dayak cover the entire island of Borneo and are therefore located in the territory of the three states of Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. The Dayak belong to the Austronesian peoples who, coming from the South China region, colonised Southeast Asia from the middle of the 3rd millennium BC. Most Dayak ethnic groups speak their own languages, but they all belong to the Malayo-Polynesian branch of the Austronesian language family. From an old German private collection, assembled since the 1950s - Minor traces of age, partly slightly chipped, headdress lost Lit.: Ave, J. B. / King, V. (1986): People of the Weeping Forest. Tradition and Change in Borneo. Leiden. - Hein, A.R. (1895): Zur Entwicklungsgeschichte des Ornamentes bei den Dayaks. Wien - Sellato, B. (1992): Hornbill and Dragon. Arts and Culture of Borneo. Sun Tree Publishing. - Taylor, P. M. / Aragon, L. V. (1990): Beyond The Java Sea. Arts of Indonesia`s Outer Islands. New York.

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