DROUOT

Inter-antiquariaat Mefferdt & De Jonge

Inter-Antiquariaat Mefferdt & De Jonge - +31 - (0)20 - 66 40 841 - Email

NL-1077 TZ Amsterdam, Netherlands
Information Conditions of sale
Gallery
Since 2002 Inter-Antiquariaat and Antiquariaat Pieter Mefferdt act under one name : Inter-Antiquariaat Mefferdt & De Jonge.In 2004, the company passed on from founder Peter de Jonge (1936-2004) to his son Robert-Jan de Jonge (1967). Partner Harry Kenter (1933-2020), owner of Antiquariaat Pieter Mefferdt, retired in 2009. We sell the most beautiful city plans, maps and sea charts mainly from the 16th to the 19th century. Towns views, drawn and/or printed until about 1850; also form an important part of the colection. We love prints and drawings with a story , often pieces of Dutch cultural heritage. In addition, for more than 15 years we have been the largest dealer in steel engravings and photogravures by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema worldwide.
273 results

- Middle East - Laurent Fries/Johannes Grüninger after Claudius Ptolomeus, 1535 - RARE MAP OF THE MIDDLE EAST "Tabu(la) IIII Asiae." Woodcut made by Laurent Fries and Johannes Grüninger in 1525 for "Geographia" by Claudius Ptolomeus, published in 1535. Verso: Latin text and a key to important locations marked on the map. Size: 32,0 x 45,5 cm. This rare and early map depicts the region between the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf, covering Cyprus, Palestine, Holy Land, Mesopotamia, Babylonia, Arabia Petraea, Armenia Minor, Assyria [Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq] and is based on the work of Claudius Ptolemy. Laurent Fries (c.1490 - c.1531) was a physician, astrologer and geographer born in Alsace (nowadays France). After studying medicine and spending time at several European universities, he settled in Strasbourg in 1519, where he met publisher and printer Johann Grüninger. With Grüninger, he worked on a new edition of Claudius Ptolemeus' "Geographia", which was published in 1522 and 1525 and included woodcut maps reduced from an earlier work "Geographie Opus Novissima" by Martin Waldseemüller. Fries eventually had to move out of Strasbourg which marked the end of his cartographic career. He would continue to write on medicine, astrology and religion until his death in c.1531. The subsequent 1535 (and 1541) editions of Fries' "Geographia" were published posthumously. Johann Grüninger (c.1455 - c.1532) was a Swabish printer and publisher based in Strasbourg and was known to be one of the most prolific printers of the time. He was associated with the Saint Dié group of scholars formed by, amongst others, cartographer Martin Waldseemüller. After Grüninger's death in 1531 or 1532, his son Christoph sold his woodcuts to Melchior and Gaspar Trechsel from Lyon who published the later editions of the "Geographia". Claudius Ptolemy (100-170 CE) was a Roman geographer and mathematician living in Alexandria, who compiled his knowledge and theories about the world's geography into one seminal work. Although his maps did not survive, his mathematical projections and location coordinates did. During the Renaissance "Geographia" was rediscovered by monks and the maps were recreated based upon Ptolemy's detailed instructions. The first printed edition of "Geographia" with maps was published in Bologna in 1477. Price: Euro 1.250,-

1,250 EUR

- Madagascar - Pieter Mortier, c. 1700 - PIRATE HAVEN MADAGASCAR "Carte Particuliere de l'Isle Dauphine ou Madagascar et St. Laurens", copper engraving on two sheets published by Pieter Mortier in Amsterdam approx. 1700. With original hand coluring. Size: 56.2 x 85.1 cm. A large chart of Madagascar, including the islands of Isle De Bourbon ou de Mascaregne [Mauritius], Santa Apolonia [Réunion], Isle De Ioan de Lisboa [perhaps the island of Rodrigues] and Isles de Comorre [Comoro Islands]. In lower left hand corner an inset map of the bay of Saint Augustin on Madagascar. Madagascar itself shows a place called Masalagem Nova where the Portuguese from Mozambique trade their wines and fruits. The map was published in Pieter Mortier's monumental three-part sea-atlas, 'Le Neptune François'. The first part was a counterfeit of a French original; the second part, the 'Atlas Maritime' contained charts engraved by Romeijn de Hooghe, including the famous chart of the Mediterranean; the third, the 'Suite de Neptune François', contained charts from Portuguese sources. This chart comes from a full-colour example rather than the usual outline. Of particular interest are the delineations of Antongil Bay and Nosy Boraha [Île Sainte-Marie] in the north east: at the time both were havens for European pirates preying on the East India trade and Mughal treasure ships. The actions of William Kidd, Henry Every, John Bowen and Thomas Tew in the region helped make the period of this chart the golden age of piracy. Price: Euro 1.100,-

1,100 EUR

- Russia - Nicolaes Visscher, 1681 - Moscoviae seu Russiae Magnae Generalis Tabula quâ Lapponia, Norvegia Suecia, Dania, Polonia, Maximaeque partes Germaniae, Tartariae, Turcici Imperii, aliaeque Regiones adjacentes simul ostenduntur; de novo correcta et edita. Kopergravure uitgegeven door Nicolaes Visscher II als onderdeel van de "Atlas Minor"? na 1681. Later met de hand gekleurd. Size: 41.5 x 52.5 cm. Uitgevershuis Visscher kwam op toen Claes Jansz. Visscher rond 1608 begon met het versieren van de kaarten van Willem Blaeu en Jodocus Hondius. De uitgeverij zou onder zijn zoon Nicolaes I en kleinzoon Nicolaes II (1649-1702) uitgroeien tot een van de belangrijkste uitgevers van kaarten, plattegronden, stadsgezichten en prenten. Visschers Atlas Minor was niet zo klein als gelijknamige atlassen uit die tijd. De uitgave was op folio-formaat en bevatte tussen de 60 en 150 kaarten. Nicolaes II kreeg steeds meer kaarten van eigen fabricage tot zijn beschikking en werd minder afhankelijk van de vroegere werken van vader en grootvader. Verouderde Visscher kaarten werden in 1684 bij opbod verkocht. De kennis over Rusland in de 17de eeuw voert terug naar Isaac Massa (1585-1643?), een Haarlemse graanhandelaar en de eerste Nederlandse diplomaat aan het Kremlin. Massa verzamelde gegevens van Russische ontdekkingsreizigers waarvan hij verschillende kaarten maakte. Massa's weergave van de Siberische kust betekende een enorme sprong voorwaarts in geografische kennis en was tientallen jaren de enige kaart van het gebied. De kaart werd gekopieerd door Nederlandse uitgevers als Mercator, Hondius, Janssonius en Blaeu. Price: Euro1.250,-

1,250 EUR

- New York and New Jersey - Homann Heirs, 1778 - FINE MAP OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY, MADE DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR "Mappa Geographica Provinciae Novae Eboraci ab Anglis New York dictae... cura C. J. Sauthier cui accedit Nova Jersey...", copper engraved map on two joined sheets. Original hand colouring with later additions, published in Nuremberg by Homann Heirs in 1778. Size: 73,5 x 58,5 cm. The map is derivative of Claude Joseph Sauthier's (1736-1802) greatest production, a large manuscript map of the provinces of New York and New Jersey which was first published on three sheets in 1776. That map also included details taken from Bernard Ratzer's survey of New Jersey. Sauthier continued to improve his manuscript during the first years of the Revolution, and in 1779 it was published again, but on six sheets. The present map is a reduced version of this mapping sequence. The Sauthier map contains a vast amount of information lacking in earlier works, particularly in upstate New York, the Catskills, and Vermont. It is a great record of New York and New Jersey from the Revolutionary War period. Alsatian by birth, Claude Joseph Sauthier accompanied Governor William Tryon to North Carolina in 1769. He surveyed several North Carolina towns before accompanying Tryon to New York in 1771. He subsequently conducted many surveys of New York, and during the revolution he served as a military engineer producing a number of fine maps for the British Army. Our map was made by Germany's premier printer of cartographic works, originally founded by Johann Baptist Homann (1663-1724). Homann had established himself in Nuremberg, and by 1715 was appointed Geographer to the Emperor, producing some of the finest maps and atlases of the age. After Homann's death, the prolific business was taken over by his son, Johann Christoph. From 1730, the firm was entrusted to a committee of family members, the Homann Heirs, who published maps and atlases for the next two generations, maintaining the high standards set by Johann Baptist. Price: Euro1.650,- (excl. VAT/BTW)

1,650 EUR

- Oost-Indië vaarder - Johannes van Keulen I, Anthonie de Winter, 1680 - Oost-Indië vaarder uit Johannes Van Keulen I's De Volmaakte Bootsman, uitgegeven te Amsterdam in 1680. Kopergravure vervaardigd door Anthonie de Winter (1652 - 1707). Size: 41.5 x 51 cm. Grote en fraai gegraveerde scheepsprent uit een uiterst zeldzaam boek van een onbekende auteur. "Zeer dienstig voor alle zeevarende lieden." "De Volmaakte Bootsman: vervattende hoe men uit eene gegeven scheepslengte de voornaamste scheepsdeelen zal vinden, de bemasting, het kerven van het staande en loopende touwwerk en verder hetgeen in het toetakelen der schepen van nooden is : mitsgaders de takelagie voor verscheiden charters van schepen, welke bij de 's lands oorlogschepen in gebruik zijn, en verder al hetgeene, dat een kloek bootsman noodig is." Voorafgaand aan de inleiding wordt de lezer toegesproken: "Kloeke mannen, die de baar[d]en, Van Neptunus zult bevaren, Wilt gij weten net en wis, 't Geen een Zeeman nodig is. Hoe men moet de Scheepen bouwen, Nette maat in alles houwen, Van de deelen groot en klein, Die tot dit werk nodig zijn, Masten, Stengen, Raas en Zeilen, Om in 't taak'len niet te feilen. Hoe men 't staand en lopen goed, Op haar Passe kerve moet, Hier na 't Bolwerk evenaren, En waar alle touwtjes varen. Ziet deez' dingen alle gaar Hier in order bij malkaar. Wat een Bootsman dient te weten, Daar van is hier niets vergeten. Daarom, Helden van Beleid, Poog je d'een of d'andre tijd, Als Captein te commandeeren, Gaat deez' bladen eerst doorleren. Wend u dan tot hoger stof, Zult bereiken eer en lof." Het boek werd (gewijzigd?) heruitgegeven in 1818 door de weduwe Hulst van Keulen. Daarin is ook de gravure van scheepsvoorstelling opgenomen. De koperen plaat is dan echter al sterk afgesleten en de afdruk zeer zwak. Price: Euro2.950,- (incl. lijst)

2,950 EUR

- Wall map of the world - Eustache Hérison, 1825 - WALL MAP OF THE WORLD MAP FROM THE AGE OF DISCOVERY "La Mappe Monde ou le Globe Terrestre Représenté en deux Hémisphères, l'un Oriental, l'autre Occidental, où sont marquées Les Découvertes les plus récentes Faites par Mackenzie, Vancouver, La Pérouse, Bruce, Renell, Mungo-Park, Joub Barrow et Le Vaillant". Double-hemisphere wall map of the world, copper engraving on 2 joined leaves, by Eustache Hérisson. Revised edition published in Paris by Basset, 1825. Size: 90 x 119 cm (hemispheres each Ø 60,5 cm). Coloured by a later hand. Very rare world map, precisely engraved and filled with finely rendered detail in the interior and along coastlines. The map includes the latest information from the discoveries of Captain Cook, who's three voyages are chronicled. This revised edition is an update of earlier and smaller editions of the map (the first being issued in 1795) with the most recent discoveries added. The explorers Lapérouse, Alexander Mackenzie, George Vancouver, James Bruce, James Renell, Mungo Park, John Barrow and François Le Vaillant are mentioned in the caption and their respective voyages indicated on the map. About the explorers: James Cook (1728-1779) joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society. This notice came at a crucial moment in both Cook's career and the direction of British overseas exploration, and led to his commission in 1766 as commander of HMS Endeavour for the first of three Pacific voyages. On his voyages to the Pacific Captain Cook achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand. In three voyages Cook sailed thousands of miles across largely uncharted areas of the globe. He mapped lands from New Zealand to Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean in greater detail and on a scale not previously achieved. As he progressed on his voyages of discovery he surveyed and named features, and recorded islands and coastlines on European maps for the first time. He displayed a combination of seamanship, superior surveying and cartographic skills, physical courage and an ability to lead men in adverse conditions. Compte Lapérouse (1741 - 1788?) was appointed in 1785 by Louis XVI to lead an expedition around the world. The expedition's aims were to complete the Pacific discoveries of James Cook, correct and complete maps of the area, establish trade contacts, open new maritime routes and enrich French science and scientific collections. His ships were the Astrolabe and the Boussole. They were to explore both the north and south Pacific, including the coasts of the Far East and of Australia, and send back reports through existing European outposts in the Pacific. Alexander Mackenzie (1764 - 1820) was a Scottish explorer known for his overland crossing of what is now Canada to reach the Pacific Ocean in 1793. Captain George Vancouver (1757 -1798) was an English officer of the Royal Navy, best known for his 1791-95 expedition, which explored and charted North America's northwestern Pacific Coast regions, including the coasts of contemporary Alaska, British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. He also explored the Hawaiian Islands and the southwest coast of Australia. James Bruce (1730 - 1794) was a Scottish traveller and travel writer who spent more than a dozen years in North Africa and Ethiopia, where he traced the origins of the Blue Nile. James Rennell (1742 -1830) was the leading British geographer of his time. Rennell constructed the first nearly accurate map of India. Todays he is known as the 'Father of Indian Geography'. Mungo Park (1771 - 1806) was a Scottish explorer of the African continent. He was the first Westerner known to have travelled to the central portion of the Niger River. John Barrow (1764-1848) was an English statesman and one of the greatest promoters of British exploration. Most notably were his expeditions to West Africa and the North Polar Region with attempts to find a Northwest Passage from east to west through the Canadian Arctic. François Le Vaillant (1753 -1824) was a French author, explorer, naturalist, zoological collector, noted ornithologist, and traveller of Africa. Price: Euro3.250,-

3,250 EUR

- Africa - Willem and Joan Bleau, c. 1640 - Africae nova descriptio Copper engraving with outline colour to cartographical image and full colour to pictorial borders. Published in Amsterdam by Willem Jansz. and Joan Blaeu c. 1640. Size: 41 x 55,5 cm. In handsome walnut frame. This is a cornerstone map of Africa and is one of the better known, more decorative maps of Africa of the seventeenth century. The map shows major African towns across the top: Tangiers, Ceuta, Algiers, Tunis, Alexandria, Cairo, the island of Mozambique, The Mine at St. George in Guinea and Canaria in the Canary Islands. The left and right borders show various indigenous costumes: Moroccans, Senegalese, traders in Guinea, Congolese, Egyptians, Abyssinians, Mozambicans, the king of Madagascar and inhabitants of Cape of Good Hope. The body of the map is richly embellished with animals, including elephants, monkeys, ostriches, gazelles, lions, cheetahs and camels. In the oceans are numerous sailing ships, sea monsters, flying fish, and a gorgeous compass rose. Much of the geographical information is still based on the Ptolemaic maps, with the Nile shown with its source in the Lakes Zaire and Zaflan. Also included are various other mythical lakes and rivers including the famous Lake Sachaf. Only coastal towns are named on the Cape, with the printing covering much of the unknown territory. Willem Janszoon, or Willem Jansz. Bleau (1571-1638) as he was to be later more commonly known, was one of the noted Dutch cartographers and map publishers of the seventeenth century. After preparation as a pupil of the great Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, Bleau initially concentrated on globemaking and separately published maps, including wall maps of the continents. From 1608, he dominated the market for wall maps and sea atlases, and in 1630 produced his terrestrial atlas. These atlases were continued by his sons Joan (c. 1599-1673) and Cornelis (1610-1644), culminating in the great Atlas Maior of 1662 in 11 volumes by Joan Bleau with subsequent editions. On February 23, 1672 a fire at the offices of the Bleau publishing effectively ended the successful Bleau business. Joan died after the fire in 1673, and, though Joan II continued the business for some time, many of the plates were auctioned shortly thereafter. This map was not reprinted after 1672 as the Africa copperplate is not known to have survived the fire. The Spanish edition of the Atlas Maior was in the process of being printed, including the section on Africa with this map of Africa, when the fire occurred. Blaeu's maps set the standard for the quality of the engraving, paper and colour, as well as a fine depiction of contemporary geographical knowledge. Price: Euro 2.850,- (incl. frame)

2,850 EUR

- Indonesia, Strait of Sunda or Batavia - Laurie and Whittle, 1794 - INDONESIA NAUTICAL CHART "A New Chart for Sailing between the Straits of Sunda or Batavia and the Straits of Banca and Gaspar." Copper engraving from "The East-India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator" published in London by Robert Laurie and James Whittle in 1794. Coloured by a later hand. Size: 50,8 x 68,6 cm. Nautical chart of northwestern Java and eastern Sumatra, including the Straits of Sunda and the Strait of Banca. The map covers from the Strait of Banca southwards to the Krakatoa volcano, the east as far as Batavia (Jakarta). Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, this region was a major battleground between rival Dutch, British, and Portugese trading monopolies. The Dutch and British in particular contested over northwestern Java, with its easy access to regional spice, in particular pepper, ports. In 1602 the British East India Company established a trade entrepot at Bantam to contest the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in nearby Batavia. The Dutch, allied with a local Sultan, eventually drove the English out of Bantam and Java itself. By the end of the 18th century, when this map was made, the Bantam entrepot was little more than a name on a map - as seen here - while Batavia further east had risen, with a population of nearly one million, to dominate Java. In 1800, just six years after this map was published, the VOC was formally dissolved and the Dutch East Indies established in its place as a full-fledged national colonial venture. The British meanwhile established themselves in Bencoolen, on Sumatra, and later in Singapore and Malacca. Cartographically this chart is derived from earlier maps prepared for Jean-Baptiste d'Apres de Mannevillette's 1745 Neptune Oriental. It was subsequently updated and revised under Laurie and Whittle based on charts compiled by Captain Lestock Williams. The map offers rich detail including countless depth soundings, notes on the sea floor, commentary on reefs, rhumb lines, shoals, place names and a wealth of other practical information for the mariner. Price: Euro975,- (excl. VAT/BTW)

975 EUR

- Indonesia, Strait of Bali - Laurie and Whittle, 1794 - INDONESIA NAUTICAL CHART "A New Plan of the Straits Situated to the East of Java & Madura commonly called The Straits of Bali and of Pondi and Respondi." Copper engraving from "The East-India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator" published in London by Robert Laurie and James Whittle in 1794. Coloured by a later hand. Size approx. 35, 6 x 50,8 cm. Nautical chart of the Strait of Bali, Indonesia, from Java's eastern extension to include the western half of Bali and the islands of Madura and Respondi (Sapudi). An inset near the left border details Java's Bay of Ballambouang. Java was a major producer of rice during the colonial era. Madura and most of Java was under the influence of the Dutch during this period. The map offers rich detail including countless depth soundings, notes on the sea floor, commentary on reefs, rhumb lines, shoals, coastal features, place names and a wealth of other practical information for the mariner. Cartographically this chart is derived from earlier maps prepared for Jean-Baptiste d'Apres de Mannevillette's 1745 Neptune Oriental. De Manevillette based his chart, as noted under the title, on "observations and remarks of the English Ships; the Winchelsea, commanded by the learned Mr. Howe. Howe, from whose surveys the Plan of the Eastern Part of Madura, and the Straits has been delineated; the Chesterfield in 1760; the Royal George in 1766; and of the French Ships, l'Elephant, and le Chameau, 1759: agreeable also with the remarks made by the English Ships, Onslow, Triton, Sandwich, Osterley, in 1758; Tavistock and Hawke in 1759". Price: Euro975,- (excl. VAT/BTW)

975 EUR

- Indonesia, West Coast of Sumatra - Laurie and Whittle, 1794 - INDONESIA NAUTICAL CHART "A Chart of the West Coast of Sumatra from Old Bencoolen to Buffaloe Point containing the Road of Bencoolen and Poolo Bay. Plan of Rat Island. Plan of Poolo Bay. "Copper engraving from "The East-India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator" published in London by Robert Laurie and James Whittle in 1794. Coloured by a later hand. Size: approx. 63,5 x 53,3 cm. Nautical chart of the west coast of Sumatra in the vicinity of Bencoolen or Fort Marlborough. The map is divided into three sections, the left hand side being a general nautical chart of the approaches to Bencoolen and Fort Marlborough, the right hand plans are details of Rat Island and Poolo Bay. Bencoolen (Bengkulu) was established as a pepper-trading center by the British East India Company in 1685. By the time this map was drawn Bencoolen has been renamed "Old Bencoolen", being superseded in 1714 by Fort Marlborough just to the south. The map offers considerable detail on the approaches to Bencoolen for which Rat Island (top right submap) is an important marker, as well as a staging post were vessels could dry anchor and dry nets. Poolo Bay (Pulau Bay) (bottom right submap), some seven miles south of Fort Marlborough, was at the time an excellent harbor and anchorage. There the map identifies warehouses as well as lime ovens and a fresh water source. Though most charts in the East-India Pilot were derived from earlier maps prepared for Jean-Baptiste d'Apres de Mannevillette's 1745 Neptune Oriental, this particular chart is a new production unique to Laurie and Whittle. The map offers rich detail including countless depth soundings, notes on the sea floor, commentary on reefs, rhumb lines, shoals, place names and a wealth of other practical information for the mariner. Cartographically it was derived from surveys by Captain Joseph Huddart, John Price, and a Mr McDonald. Price: Euro975 (excl. VAT/BTW)

975 EUR

- Exotic birds - Diderot et d'Alembert - 1751-1777 - Exotische vogels uit Encyclopedie de Diderot et d'Alembert Kopergravures vervaardigd door Robert Benard, naar ontwerpen door François Nicolas Martinet uit de fameuze encyclopedie van Diderot en d'Alembert Dictionnaire Raisonné des Sciences, des Arts et des Métiers uitgegeven tussen 1751-1777. Later met de hand gekleurd. Afm. elk ca. 20,4 x 35cm. De als ingenieur geschoolde François Nicolas Martinet (1731- ca. 1790) tekende vogels voor de meest invloedrijke Franse ornithologen van de 18de-eeuw. Later in zijn loopbaan gaf hij zijn eigen ornithologische werken uit. Niet alleen door z'n omvang (72.000 artikelen in 17 delen plus 11 delen met illustraties) wordt de Encyclopédie van Diderot en d'Alembert beschouwt als een intellectuele en artistieke onderneming, die het boegbeeld geworden is van De Verlichting in Frankrijk in de 18de-eeuw. Reeds in de 17de-eeuw was men begonnen met het samenstellen van een groot encyclopedisch werk. In 1747 de Diderot en d'Alembert namen de redactie van het almaar uitdijende werk over. Maar de redacteurs houden zich niet aan de voorgestelde inhoud: in plaats van een compendium van alle kennis uit te geven, gebruiken zij de Encyclopédie om subversieve ideeën tussen de artikels te glijden. De uitgave kende een groot succes, dankzij de zakelijke lemma's. Maar waar de inschrijvers een op feiten gebaseerde Encyclopédie verwachtten, kregen ze polemische lemma's te lezen met aanvallen op godsdienst en staat en werd in 1752 de uitgave een eerste keer verboden. De Encyclopédie werd gezien als staatsgevaarlijke publicatie, vermomd als wetenschap. D'Alembert verliet het redactieteam, niettemin slaagt Diderot erin, met hulp van een koninklijke censor, de Encyclopédie te voltooien in 1765. Price: Euro 375,- (per stuk, incl. lijst)

375 EUR

- Map of the moon - Johann Baptiste Homann, Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr, 1742/48 - IMPORTANT MAP OF THE MOON "Tabula Selenographica in qua Lunarium Macularum exacta Descriptio secundum Nomenclaturam ... Hevelii quam Riccioli". Copper engraving made by Johann Baptist Homann after Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr, from the Atlas Coelestis in quo Mundus Spectabilis published in Nuremberg in 1742 or 1748. Coloured by a later hand. Size c. 48,5 x 58 cm. The left-hand lunar map, composed by Johannes Hevelius, is considered a foundational map in the science of Selenography - or lunar cartography. This map first appeared in Hevelius' 1647 work Selenographia which laid the groundwork for most subsequent lunar cartographic studies. Here the moon is presented as it can never be seen from Earth, at a greater than 360 degrees and with all visible features given equal weight. In this map Hevelius also establishes the convention of mapping the lunar surface as if illuminated from a single source - in this case morning light. The naming conventions he set forth, which associate lunar features with terrestrial locations such as "Asia Minor", "Persia", "Sicilia", etc. were popular until the middle of the 18th century when Giovanni Battista Riccioli's nomenclature took precedence. The Riccioli map, on the right, is more properly known as the Riccioli-Grimaldi map, after fellow Jesuit Francesco Grimaldi with whom Riccioli composed the chart. This map first appeared in Riccioli and Grimaldi's 1651 Almagestum Novum. This was a significant lunar chart and offered an entirely new nomenclature which, for the most part, is still in use today. Curiously, though Riccioli, as a devout Jesuit, composed several treatises denouncing Copernican theory, he chose to name one of the Moon's most notable features after the astronomer - perhaps suggesting that he was a secret Copernicus sympathizer? Other well-known lunar features named by Riccioli include the Sea of Tranquility where Apollo 11 landed and where Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon's surface 50 years ago. The upper left and right hand quadrants feature decorative allegorical cartouche work that include images of putti looking through a telescope and a representation of the ancient Greek Moon goddess Selene. Additional smaller maps show the moon in various phases of its monthly cycle. Below the map proper extensive Latin text discusses Selenography. This map first appeared Johann Baptist Homann's 1707 Neuer Atlas and was later reissued as plate no. 11 in Doppelmayr's important 1742 Atlas Coelestis, which was also published by Homann. Price: 2.250,- (incl. frame)

2,250 EUR

- World, rare 18th century wall map - A General Map of the World or Terraqueous Globe, with all the New Discoveries and Marginal Delineations, Containing the Most Interesting Particulars in the Solar, Starry and Mundane Systems ... . 1794?. Drawn in London by Thomas Dunn based on earlier cartographic research by J. B. B. D'Anville. Published by Laurie and Whittle as plate nos. 1-2 in the 1797 edition of Thomas Kitchin's General Atlas. Size: 106,7 x 124,5 cm. Beautiful double hemisphere wall map of the world, embellished with a number of different Celestial Models. The map was revised several times to include the discoveries of Captain Cook's 3 voyages. The general outline of North America is known in 1794. However, few inland expeditions had extended westward beyond the Mississippi. The map notes two separate speculative courses for the mythical River of the West, a northern route extending from Lake Winnipeg and a southern route passing south of Winnepeg through Pike's lake. South America exhibits a typically accurate coastline and limited knowledge of the interior beyond Peru and the populated coastlands. A few islands are noted off the coast, including the Galapagos, which are referred to as the Inchanted Islands. The Amazon is vague with many of its tributaries drawn in speculatively. In Africa we also find the coasts well defined but a vague interior. The Nile River follows the Ptolemaic course with a presumed source in two lakes at the base of the "Mountains of the Moon". Asia is exceptionally well mapped reflecting the most recent information available in Europe. Australia appears in full as New Holland or Terra Australis. Numerous points along the coast are named with associated notes regarding the activities of various explorers. Van Diemen's Land or Tasmania is curiously attached to the mainland - an error that many earlier maps had long ago corrected. There is little trace of either Antarctica or the Great Southern continent. Price: Euro 4.500,-

4,500 EUR

- Loggie di Rafaele nel Vaticano - Giovanni Ottaviani, 1772 - RAFAËL INSPIREERT DE NEO-KLASSIEKEN Decoratieve pilasters met fruit, bloemen en wingerd. (Deels in de tijd, deels later) met de hand gekleurde gravures, elk gedrukt van twee koperen platen, uitgegeven te Rome 1772. Afkomstig uit de serie (uitgegeven in boekvorm) "Loggie di Rafaele nel Vaticano"? en gegraveerd door Giovanni Ottaviani en Giovanni Volpato naar tekeningen van Gaetano Savorelli. Formaat elk ca. 107,3 x 40,6 cm. (Afm. lijst: 123 x 56,5 cm.) Rafael Sanzio da Urbino (1483 - 1520), in het Nederlands beter bekend als Rafaël, vertrok vanuit Florence naar Rome vermoedelijk omdat hem ter ore was gekomen dat er in het Vaticaan, destijds onder Paus Julius II, privé-vertrekken waren die opnieuw gedecoreerd moesten worden. In 1509 kreeg hij de opdracht voor één van de vertrekken. Met succes, al heel snel gold hij in het Vaticaan, op Michelangelo na, als de belangrijkste kunstenaar. Hij zou er de rest van zijn korte leven blijven. Rafaël en zijn assistenten maakten de wand- en plafondschilderingen in de Loggia van het Vaticaan in 1518-1519. De prenten tonen de decoratie van de Loggia op de belangrijkste verdieping van het appartementen gebouw van het Vaticaan. De prenten zijn veelal een combinatie van Rafaëlitsche design elementen omdat de originele fresco's niet altijd zichtbaar meer waren. Het resultaat sprak de smaak van het publiek aan het einde van de 18e eeuw enorm aan en legde de grondslag voor de grotesken in de neo-classistische periode. Prijs: Euro 1.850,- (per stuk, incl. lijst)

1,850 EUR

- Norway - Cornelis Danckerts, c. 1696 - Norvegia Regnum Divisum in suos Diocaeses Nidrosiensem, Bergensem, Opsloensem, et Stavangriensem. Et Praefecturam Bahusiae. Engraved double-page map in beautiful original colour, published in Amsterdam approx. 1696 by Cornelis Danckerts. Size: 58 x 50 cm. The maps shows us the southern part of the Kingdom of Norway divided into the Diocese of Nidaros (today's Trontheim), Bergen, Oslo, and Stavanger and the prefecture of Bohuslän (Båhuslen). There is an inset map of northern Norway in the upper left corner showing the Finnmark region?. The 17th century saw a series of wars between Denmark-Norway and Sweden. The Kalmar War between 1611 and 1613 saw 8.000 Norwegian peasants conscripted. Despite lack of training, Denmark-Norway won and Sweden abandoned its claims to the land between Tysfjord and Varangerfjord. With the Danish participation in the Thirty Years' War in 1618-48, a new conscription system was created in which the country was subdivided into 6.000 legd, each required to support one soldier. Denmark-Norway lost the war and was forced to cede Jämtland and Härjedalen to Sweden. The Second Northern War in 1657 to 1660 resulted in Bohuslän being ceded to Sweden. The Danish monarch elevated himself to absolute and hereditary king of Denmark (including Norway) in 1661, eliminating the power of the nobles. A new administrative system was introduced. Departments organized by portfolio were established in Copenhagen, while Norway was divided into counties, each led by a district governor, and further subdivided into bailiwicks. About 1,600 government officials were appointed throughout the country. This map was made when Ulrik Fredrik Gyldenløve was viceroy of Norway. It is embellished by a depiction of Neptune and a mermaid below the title cartouche and crowned with the Norwegian coat of arms. The Danckerts family were notable print and map sellers, and engravers in Amsterdam for nearly a hundred years, between 1630 and 1727. Between 1680 and 1700, Justus an his three sons Cornelis, Theodorus, Justus II published several editions of their Danckerts Atlas. Their maps were in demand for the wonderful decorative quality of their engraving rather than for their accuracy. Price: Euro 725,-

725 EUR

- Holy Land - Abraham Ortelius, 1595 - HOLY LAND WITH THE WANDERINGS OF ABRAHAM IN BEAUTIFUL ORIGINAL COLOUR "Abrahami Patriarchae peregrinatio, et vita". Copper engraving published by Abraham Ortelius as part of his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, in the (rare) Latin edition of 1595. Beautiful original hand colouring. Size: 35,3 x 46,6 cm. During the sixteenth century in the Low Countries, while Gerard Mercator was the preeminent cartographical innovator and draftsman, his friend and rival Abraham Ortelius became the most important map and atlas publisher. Ortelius' atlas Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, revolutionised geographical publishing. As he expanded it in subsequent editions, he included a number of maps important to the history of mapping the Holy Land; one of which being this beautiful map surrounded by vignettes of the life of the Patriarch Abraham. The map became part of the expanding supplement of historical maps, entitled the Parergon, that Ortelius appended to his atlas of modern maps. Largely the work of the master himself, the maps in the Parergon, and this one in particular, are the best engravings that reflect the widespread sixteenth-century interest in classical geography. Territorial divisions on the map are taken from the story Abraham in Genesis. Ancient tribal names are preserved in the regions of the Philistines, Amelechites, Jebusites, Cenezites, and Gergesites. The cities of Sodom and Gomorrah still thrive along the southern Jordan in the "Valley of the Forest of Salt", which was to become the Dead Sea. An inset shows the stages of the wanderings of Abraham, from Ur of the Chaldees, the lower Euphrates Valley, to Shechem, Bethel, Damascus, Egypt, and Hebron. In keeping with the title and biblical theme of the engraving, twenty-two medallions depict scenes from the life of Abraham leaving Ur, sacrificing on the newly built altars at Shechem and Bethel, receiving the promise of the land, the birth of Isaac, the expulsion of Hagar, the sacrifice of Isaac, and the burials of Sarah and Abraham. The Wanderings of Abraham is among the most elaborate of Ortelius' compositions. It demonstrates his combined skills as a cartographer and an artist, and his accomplishment as an historian. Ortelius imaginatively enlivened the earliest period of biblical history for the readers of his Parergon. Price: Euro 2.650,-

2,650 EUR

- America rare map - Hondius/Janssonius, 1641 - America Noviter Delineata This important map was first published in 1618 by Jodocus Hondius. Cartographically, this map influenced a generation of cartographers and was the basis of understanding the Americas for the first half of the 17th century. When first issued the map was surrounded by four panels, figures on the sides and Views on the top and bottom. The plate was trimmed, removing the panels by Henricus Hondius c.1630. The map had a long life appearing in atlases up to 1665, This map is noted for its elegant engraving and pleasing layout, with fleets of ships and sea monsters, and two inset maps one showing the Arctic Circle and the other showing Greenland. The North Pole depicts Frobisher's theory of the Northwest Passage and the South Pole shows the long-held notion of the mythical southern continent. North America retains the peninsular California and the East Coast is beginning to take shape, although it still lacks detail in the mid-Atlantic region. In the Southwest the famous seven cities of Cibola appear on the banks of a large lake. In South America, there is a large inland sea and two engraved scenes, one of which details a cannibalistic feast. Two stylized insets of the two polar regions are enclosed in strapwork cartouches. Size: 37,5 x 49,8 cm (plus margins). The copperplate that produced this map was originally prepared by Jodocus Hondius Jr. in 1618. This issue, known in three examples, has decorative borders on all four sides. There is a 2nd state in c1629-30 with no decorative borders. A 3rd state was produced by Henricus Hondius in 1631. The map depicted here is the 4th state with the imprint of Janssonius and the addition of the date of 1641. There was a 5th state in 1652 with the date and the Hondius imprint removed (Burden, p. 235-6). This map has German text on the verso describing America. This map is from Johannes Janssonius' Atlas of 1646-57 with a signature on the verso of "Aaa", based on van der Krogt (p. 715). An earlier version of this map was produced by Henricus Hondius in 1631. Through the collaboration between Hondius and Janssonius (they were brothers-in-law), Hondius' map was replaced by Janssonius' map in 1641. Henricus Hondius had died in 1638. Reference: Burden map #192. Size: 37,6 x 49,9 cm. Price: Euro2.900,- (excl VAT/BTW)

2,900 EUR

- America map - Ortelius - ONE OF THE MOST ICONIC MAPS OF THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE "Americae Sive Novi Orbis, Nova Descriptio", copper engraving published by Abraham Ortelius featured in his "Theatrum Orbis Terrarum", the first modern atlas of the world, from 1570 onwards. Here in a second state of first plate with Latin text on verso. Coloured by a later hand. Size: 36,6 x 50,7 cm. Without a doubt one of the most recognized and influential maps of the Americas from the sixteenth century. It formed the European perception of America. When the map was first published, it was the best map of the Americas available. It was in fact the first of it's kind to achieve wide circulation through an atlas. North and South America stretch across this single hemisphere map. To the north, North America somewhat resembles the continent we know today, except the area near Alaska is undefined and the northwest bulges to the east. South America is a squat landmass, early editions have an extension in the southwest that would disappear in later editions of the map. The title is decorated with the key-like geometric decorations common to the maps in Ortelius' atlas. In the ocean, a sea monster lurks. In the Pacific, ships stream through the water, their sails filled with imaginary winds. The Straits of Magellan separate South America from a large southern continent that extends all the way to New Guinea. Tierra del Fuego, named by Ferdinand Magellan because he saw so many small fires burning there, is part of this continent. The name "Novae Guinea", or New Guinea, was coined by Spanish explorer Yñigo Ortíz de Retes in 1545, and it refers to his opinion that the appearance of the native peoples resembled the natives of the Guinea region of Africa. Two place names in the northwest of North America are particularly interesting. Anian derives from Ania, a Chinese province on a large gulf mentioned in Marco Polo's travels . The gulf Polo described was actually the Gulf of Tonkin, but the province's description was transposed from Vietnam to the northwest coast of North America. The first map to do this was Giacomo Gastaldi's world map of 1562, followed by Bolognino Zaltieri and Gerard Mercator in 1567. The Strait then became shorthand for a passage to China, i.e. a Northwest Passage. It appeared on maps until the mid-eighteenth century. Quivira refers to the Seven Cities of Gold sought by the Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado in 1541. In 1539, Coronado wandered over what today is Arizona and New Mexico, eventually heading to what is now Kansas to find the supposedly rich city of Quivira. Although he never found the cities or the gold, the name stuck on maps of southwest North America, wandering from east to west. Ortelius' ability to locate and draw upon both Spanish and Portuguese sources is apparent throughout the map, and is quite remarkable, given the manner in which each nation guarded its cartographic information. Both nations kept their geographic knowledge locked in a single institution, with all cartographic knowledge maintained on a single master map. Copies of the master map were closely monitored and pilots could be punished for not returning their charts; however, no vault is impenetrable and geographic secrets leaked out, including to Ortelius in Antwerp. The influence of this and other Ortelius maps stems from the popularity and dominance of his atlas in the European market. In 1570, Ortelius published the first modern atlas; that is, a set of uniform maps with supporting text gathered in book form. Previously, there were other bound map collections, specifically, the Italian Lafreri atlases, but these were sets of maps-not necessarily uniform-selected and bound together on demand. Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, Ortelius' atlas, outperformed competing atlases from other cartographic luminaries like the Mercator family. Between 1570 and 1612, 31 editions of the atlas were published in seven languages. This map, in its first edition, appeared in the very first 1570 atlas. Price: Euro 4.500,-

4,500 EUR

- Americas, Caribbean sea chart - Theunis Jacobsz Lootsman, 1650 - ONE OF THE EARLIEST SEA CHARTS OF THE NEW WORLD AND CARIBBEAN "Pascaert vande Carybes, Nieu Nederlandt, Brazil, de Flaemsche en Soute Eylanden ende landen daer omtrent gelegen." Copper engraving, seperately published by Theunis Jacobsz Lootsman in Amsterdam around 1650. This attractive sea chart assumes the perspective of the westward direction facing upwards and embraces the Western Atlantic Ocean from the Canaries and Azores, in the east, to the eastern reaches of the American continents. It features North America from Delaware up to and including Newfoundland, the West Indies from Hispaniola through to the Barbados, and South America from eastern Colombia through to Pernambuco, Brazil. Cartographically, the depiction of the Mid-Atlantic region, New England and eastern Canada is novel and distinct. The depiction of the American coasts running from the Delaware River to Cape Cod departs from the portrayal commonly used on contemporary Dutch charts that were largely derived from Adriaen Block's maps of 1614. On the present chart, Long Island is more correctly shown to have an elongated (as opposed to bulbous) form, while Narragansett Bay is shown to correctly open to the south (whereas the Block maps show the mouth of the bay to be sheltered by an island). The Hudson and the Connecticut Rivers are shown to be of exaggerated width, likely as a point of visual emphasis on their utility for inland travel, as opposed to being an accurate depiction of their breadth. Lootsman likely had access to a variety of Dutch sources emanating from the activities of the Dutch West India Company (WIC). As a result of its control of the colony of New Netherlands, the WIC controlled the region extending roughly from modern Delaware to Connecticut, holdings which they would maintain until the English conquest of New Amsterdam (New York) in 1664. The depiction of the eastern Caribbean is relatively conventional for the time, and shows the WIC's direct experience in the region, having recently settled a number of islands, including Curaçao and Saint Martin. The coasts of South America prominently feature the mouths of the Amazon and Orinoco rivers. The mapping of Northeastern Brazil is derived from WIC maps disseminated by Caspar Barlaeus during the recent Dutch hegemony over the region. Theunisz's chart was published in response to the commercial success of Willem Blaeu's West Indischen Pasckaert, as a means of offering the same map in sheets, which could also be bound into an atlas. Theunisz' map was the progenitor of an entire series of maps which covered the same region. Price: Euro 1.450,- (excl VAT/BTW)

1,450 EUR

- North America antique map - Sanson - ONE OF THE EARLIEST MAPS TO DEPICT ALL 5 GREAT LAKES - Amerique SeptentriononaleAll of North America, with California depicted as an island. Engraved by Pierre mariette, published by Nicolas Sanson in 1659. First map to name Lakes Superior and Ontario. Burden calls this a "landmark map of North America. It was drawn, with his usual care, using the sinusoidal projection which is sometimes known by the name Sanson-Flamstead. It is, perhaps, most important for being the first printed map to delineate the five Great Lakes in a recognizable form... To the west, S Fe, Navajo, Apache, Taosij and others all appear for the first time. The first is incorrectly placed on the west bank of the Rio Grande, here again flowing to the south-west. These were the first advances in the geography of this region for some time. The information was derived from the travels of Father Alonso de Benavides in the late 1620's... California as an island is of the Briggs type with some important alterations; Sanson introduces four placenames from the de Laet map of 1630, C. de Fortune, C. de Pinos, C. de S.Martin and C. de Galera..." There were three states of the map, of which this is the third. The first state, of which only two examples were known, had no land to the north-west of California; the second state, also quite uncommon, added coastline at that point, and eliminated a few placenames north of California; the third state is the same as the second, except that Lake Ontario has been shaded to match the other Great Lakes. Size: 39,8 x 57 cm. Literature: Philip Burden, The Mapping of North America (1996), nr. 294 Price: Euro3.350,- (excl. VAT/BTW)

3,350 EUR

- World antique map - Laurent Fries, 1535 - EARLIEST OBTAINABLE MAP OF THE WORLD TO INCLUDE THE NAME "AMERICA" "Orbis Typus Universalis Iuxta Hydrographorum Traditionem Exactissime Depicta"? Woodcut made by Laurent Fries in 1522, this map was published in Lyon 1535. Size: 31,5 x 46 cm. In high quality frame. The majority of the maps in Laurent Fries' edition of Claudius Ptolemy's Geographia were reduced copies from the corresponding maps in the edition of 1513 by Martin Waldseemüller. The first of the two modern world maps in the atlas is however Fries' own rendering which is dated 1522 and is initialled 'L.F.' in the main title. Unfortunately Fries has done little more than add further distortion and error to Walseemüller's rendering. Europe is very crudely drawn with England and Scotland reverting to separate islands. India is now a double peninsula. South America appears on the map, although largely based upon guesswork, as Ferdinand Magellan would not return to Europe from his circumnavigation until September 1522, several months after this map was first published. There is no mention of Terra Australis Incognita. In spite of these imperfections Fries' map is much sought after as it somehow reflects the ambiguities of his age. A framework of medieval thinking is having to be re-cast in order to accept the extent of the newly 'discovered' lands. For decorative value, if not for accuracy, the map has considerable attractions. It is the first, realistically, obtainable map of the world to name "America". The map incorporates directional lines crossing the map and an unusual frame of banners which include the names of the winds, each looped with a coil of rope. Literature: Shirley "The Mapping of the World", no. 48 Price: Euro 9.500,- (incl. frame)

9,500 EUR

- Japan map - Durant after Tavernier - Coloured copper engraving assembled from two sheets by J. Durant after a drawing of Jean-Baptiste Tavernier, 1679. Plate size: 52 x 77 cm. The map occurs only in the first edition of Taverniers "Recueil de plusieurs relations". For later editions and/or translations the map was made smaller. It shows many unusual comments about Japan. It contains legends about the nature of the country, e.g. where gold is mined. Okasaki is said to have the most beautiful women. In Lake Biwa one can catch lots of salmon. Worthless youths are sent to an island off Kyushu, where they have to work etc. From a cartographic perspective the most important innovation is the inclusion of the route of the Dutch. At Firando it states that this where they had stayed initially. At Kisma "" a different name for Deshima "" it says that this is where the Dutch are. Also some Dutch ships are depicted. The map is handsomely framed using the highest standards (UV protective glass, acid free paper, wooden, i.e. strong and water resistant, reverse side). Jean-Baptiste Tavernier (1605 - 1689), was born in Paris, where his father Gabriel and uncle Melchior, Protestants from Antwerp, pursued the profession of geographers and engravers. The conversations he heard in his father's house inspired Tavernier with an early desire to travel, and in his sixteenth year he had already visited England, the Low Countries and Germany. He was eager to visit the East; and he found the opportunity to join two French fathers, M. de Chapes and M. de St Liebau, who had received a mission to the Levant. In their company he reached Constantinople early in 1631, and then proceeded via Erivan to Persia. His farthest point in this first journey was Isfahan; he returned by Baghdad, Aleppo, Alexandretta, Malta and Italy, and was again in Paris in 1633. In September 1638 he began a second journey (1638-43) continuing to India as far as Agra and Golconda. His visit to the court of the Great Mogul and to the diamond mines was connected with the plans realized more fully in his later voyages, in which Tavernier traveled as a merchant of the highest rank, trading in costly jewels and other precious wares, and finding his chief customers among the greatest princes of the East. The second journey was followed by four others. In his third (1643-49) he went as far as Java, and returned by the Cape; but his relations with the Dutch proved not wholly satisfactory, and a long lawsuit on his return yielded but imperfect redress. In his last three journeys (1651-55, 1657-62, 1664-68) he did not proceed beyond India. The details of these voyages are often obscure; but they completed an extraordinary knowledge of the routes of overland Eastern trade, and brought the now famous merchant into close and friendly communication with the greatest Oriental potentates. They also secured for him a large fortune and great reputation at home. He was presented to Louis XIV, in whose service he had traveled sixty thousand leagues by land, received letters of nobility and in the following year purchased the barony of Aubonne, near Geneva. In 1662 he had married Madeleine Goisse, daughter of a Parisian jeweller. Thus settled in ease and affluence, Tavernier occupied himself, as it would seem at the desire of the king, in publishing the account of his journeys. He had neither the equipment nor the tastes of a scientific traveller, but in all that referred to commerce his knowledge was vast and could not fail to be of much public service. He set to produce "Le Six Voyages de J. B. Tavernier"? in 1676 and supplemented it with the "Recueil de Plusieurs Relations"? in 1679. This last contains an account of Japan, gathered from merchants and others. Reference: Walter 35 u. OAG 40; Campbell 27; Cortazzi p. 46/7 and pl. 71. Price: Euro2.650,- (excl. VAT/BTW, incl. frame)

2,650 EUR

- West Africa - Homann Heirs, 1745 - Guinea Propria, nec non Nigritiae vel Terrae Nigrorum Maxima Pars ... Aethiopia Inferior ...? "La Guinee de meme que la Plus Grande Partie du Pais des Negres ..."? Copper engraving published in 1745 by the Homann Heirs in Neuremberg. Colored partly by a contemporary, partly by a later hand. Size 46,0 x 55,5 cm plus ample margings. One of the finest maps of west Africa to appear in the mid 17th century! Details West Africa from Cape Blanc and Senegal to Guinea Inferior and the Cacongo and Barbela Rivers. Extends inland to including Ghana Lake on the Niger River as far as Regio Auri. The coast is highly detailed with numerous notations in Latin regarding the peoples and tribes of the region. The detail extends inland along some river valleys, most specifically the Niger, however, the map becomes quite vague the further the river flows inland. Features an elaborate engraving in the lower left depicting ivory, African tribespeople and a small village. Johann Baptist Homann (1663-1724), and his son, Christoph Homann (1703-30) founded 18th century's most important German cartography firm around 1702 in Nuremberg. In 1715 the elder Homann was appointed "Imperial Geographer"? by Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI. This privileged position gave Homann access to the vast resources which enabled him to produce the most advanced and accurate maps of his period. Johann Baptist Homann died in 1724. Six years after his father's death, Christoph also retired from the map business on the condition that all future maps produced by the firm be published under the name of "Homann Heirs"? Price: Euro 425,-

425 EUR

- Asia - Willem Blaeu, 1621-1630 - ICONIC MAP OF ASIA "Asia Noviter Delineata." Carte-a-figures by Willem Blaeu depicting the native manners of dress, and nine city plans and views at the top. Copper engraving, here in its second state printed between 1621-1630. Coloured by a later hand. Verso: blank. Size 41 x 55,2 cm. This map belongs to a set of maps of the four continents of which the map of Europe is dated 1617. The maps are reproductions of Blaeu's 1608 wall maps. The title of the map of proclaiming that this is a newly delineated version of Asia, apprears in a cartouche flanked by nomads, in the upper left. In the lower right there is a reference to the ten-year privilege: "Cum illustr. Ord. Hollandiae privilegio decennali." The map is framed on both sides by five costumed Asia figures, meant to exemplify the dress and customs of Asian cultures, are representative of the highly decorative style of seventeenth century maps. On the left: Syrians, Arabs, Armenians, Persians, people from Balaghat (India) and inhabitants from the island of Sumatra. The right border shows people from Java, people from the Moluccas and Banda islands, Chinese, Moscovians and Tartars. Along the upper edge runs a decorative border with nine Asian towns in oval frames: Kandy (Ceylon), Calcutta (Bengal/India), Goa (India), Damascus, Jerusalem, Hormuz (Persia), Bantam (Java/Indonesia) and Aden (Persia). Blaeu's geography was most up to date for its time, thanks in large part to his access to Dutch East India Company (VOC) charts, but a few features are still notable for their surprising appearances to the modern eye. Korea is shown as an island just barely unconnected to the Asian mainland, while Japan is oddly projected in a horizontal style that was typical to this period. The coast north of Korea is only roughly drawn, as it had not been surveyed in detail. To the south, large portions of the Borneo coastline and other parts of the islands in Southeast Asia are incomplete or highly inaccurate. Separating North America ("America Pars") and Asia is the "Fretium Anian", or the Strait of Anian. This was a representation of the much-hoped-for Northwest Passage, a still-undiscovered navigable water passage from Europe north to the Pacific. Anian derives from Ania, a Chinese province on a large gulf mentioned in Marco Polo's travels. The gulf Polo described was actually the Gulf of Tonkin, but the province's description was transposed from Vietnam to the northwest coast of North America. It appeared on maps until the mid-eighteenth century. As if to underline the fanciful nature of unknown borders and wandering islands, the map includes many embellishments. Several ships patrol the waters, with two large ships locked in battle to the east of the Philippines. Another fires a broadside at a whale in the northeast of the map. West of Sumatra, a merman blows on a conch shell. On land, a lion watches over the entire scene from the interior of eastern Africa. The Great Wall of China is drawn in detail, with a camel nearby. An elephant marches purposefully near the Chismay Lake, said to be the source of the Ganges. Although the map shows all of Asia, of especial importance are the islands of Southeast Asia: Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Celebes, the Moluccas, and others. The Moluccas were the vaunted Spice Islands, originally the only source in the world for nutmeg, mace, and cloves. This is a map that appeals both to a sense of cartographic history and to an aesthetic sense of beauty. This is a cornerstone, folio-size map of Asia and is one of the better known, more decorative maps of Asia of the 17th century. Willem Janszoon, or Willem Jansz Blaeu (1571-1638) as he is more commonly known, was one of the most noted Dutch cartographers and map publisher of the 17th century. Blaeu's maps are "esteemed by collectors for their decorative quality, historical importance, and as the highest expression of Dutch cartographic art during the period of its supremacy" (Tooley, p 28). After preparation as a pupil of the great Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, Blaeu initially concentrated on globe making and separately published maps, including wall maps of the continents. From 1608, he dominated the market for sea atlases and in 1630 produced his terrestrial atlas. These atlases were continued by his sons, culminating in the great Atlas Maior of 1662 in 11 volumes with subsequent editions. Price: Euro 3.450,-

3,450 EUR

- Belle Epoque fashion - Jules David, 1877 - ELEGANTE DAMES IN HET BOIS DE BOULOGNE Mode tekening met pen en waterverf op karton door Jules David (1808 - Parijs - 1892). Gesigneerd links onder. Verso gedateerd/beschreven: "1877 / 3ème No d'Avril / No 16"?. Afmetingen: 29,1 x 23,5 cm. Het aquarel stamt uit een serie van modeontwerpen gemaakt door David voor het Parijse modetijdschrift "Le Moniteur de la Mode" ("Journal du Grand Monde. Modes, Illustrations, Patrons, Litterature, Beaux-Arts,Theatres"?). Hiervan bevinden zich verschillende exemplaren in het Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Pavillon de Marsan/Louvre). Jules David was leerling van Duval le Camus en ontving van Le Salon in 1885 een Mention Honorable. Dit werk komt uit de verzameling van Charlotte von Prybram-Gladona. Charlotte, habituée van de Beau Monde, werd in 1910 geboren te München en trouwde op vierentwintigjarige leeftijd met de Weense edelman Albin von Prybram-Gladona. De echtelieden ontmoetten elkaar tijdens de danslessen die Albin, twintig jaar ouder dan Charlotte, nam om fit te blijven (!). Zijn familie onderhield nauwe banden met Einstein, Schweitzer, Rilke en Thomas Mann, terwijl hij Johannes Brahms kende als "˜onkel Jo'. Toen Charlotte en Albin vlak voor het uitbreken van de Tweede Wereldoorlog verhuisden naar Parijs, verkochten zij noodgedwongen het leeuwendeel van hun meubelcollectie. Dat stelde hen echter wel in staat zich over te geven aan hun passie voor tekeningen, die beduidend minder plaats innamen. Het echtpaar keerde in 1969 terug naar Oostenrijk en vestigde zich in Salzburg. Albin overleed vijf jaar later, terwijl Charlotte er de hoge leeftijd van 92 bereikte. Prijs: Euro 950,-

985 EUR

- Asia - Hendrik van Loon after Nicolas de Fer, 1724 - SPECTACULAR WALL MAP OF ASIA "L'Asie, divisee selon l'etendue de ses principales parties" [Asia, shown according to the extent of its main parts]. Rare copper engraving in 4 sheets made in 1696 by Hendrik van Loon according to the design of Nicolas de Fer, geographer to the king, published in Paris by Guillaume Danet in 1724. With to the left and right 4 more sheets of letterpress borders in French "Description de l'Asie" and title above. Coloured by a later hand. Total size: 106 x 157 cm. The map is surmounted with a decorative title cartouche "L'Asie Ou Tous les Points Principaux sont Placez sur les Observations des Mrs. De l'Academie Royale des Sciences." [Asia where all main points indicated are based upon the observations of the gentlemen of the Royal Academy of Sciences]. The cartouche to the left dedicates the map to [of course] Louis of France, Le Grand Dauphin. There are detailed inset maps of the Artic area around Spitsbergen and Nova Zembla and two of northeast China, based upon the memoires of the Jesuits Martino Martini and Ferdinand Verbiest. The elaborate engraved borders show and explain about the peoples of Asia: the Chinese, Japanese, Turks, Indians, Tartars [Russians], Philippines/Moluccans/inhabitants of the Sunda Islands and Ceylon, Arabs, Goans, Mingrelians, Les Imirettes [?], Armenians, Georgians, Golkondans, Malay, Siamese [Thai], and Cochinchinese/Tonkinchinese [Vietnamese]. The rare [!] letterpress description explains about the geography of Asia in general with its rivers, towns, capes, lakes and straights, as well as more in detail about Turkey, Arabia, China, Persia, India, Russia, and "the islands of Asia in the Ocean". Nicolas de Fer was one of the foremost French cartographers of the late-17th century who had encompassed the most decorative elements of French map making for this great piece of work. In his early career, de Fer is better known for producing small atlases on Europe and France but in 1690 he became the official geographer to the Dauphin, later geographer to the French and Spanish kings. In the 1690s under the Dauphin's patronage he issued a series of wallmaps for the nobility of France; in his lifetime some 26 wall maps were issued. The condition of this piece correlates to size and age: it has overall browning and numerous cracks and tears to margins and image, The sheets of paper are mounted on linen. Price: Euro 14.500,-

14,500 EUR

- Caribbean, Windward Islands - Widow of Joachim Ottens, 1719-1723 - DETAILED MAP OF THE WINDWARD ISLANDS "Tabula novissima atque accuratissima Caraibicarum insularum sive Cannibalum : quae etiam Antillae Gallicae dicuntur, item insulae Supraventum, et in Archipelago Mexicano sitae sunt, ac detectae a Christ. Columbo Ao. MCCCCLXXXXIII" [Latest and most accurate map of the Caribbean or Cannibal Islands: also called the French Antilles, or Windward Islands, located in the Archipelago of Mexico, which were discovered by Christopher Columbus in the year 1493]. Copper engraving "after the observations of skilful sailors" made by Reinier Ottens and printed by the Window of Joachim Ottens in Amsterdam 1719-1723. With original hand colouring. Size: 58 x 48 cm. Detailed map of the Windward Islands from Guadeloupe south to Grenada, including the small islands of Mustique (Grenadines) and Ronde Island (Grenada), with a large inset map of Martinique. Grenada has been moved north and is shown west of Carriacou island, in order that it fits on the sheet. Apart from topographical information, there are some notes of historic interest. According to the map tens of thousands live on Martinique ("Matanino as the locals call it and occupied by the French since July 1635") and its tobacco is of the best quality. La Désiderade island was discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493 on his second voyage to America. "The island of Guadeloupe, called Carukeira [The Island of Beautiful Waters] by the locals, is very fertile with rice, maize, potatoes, ginger and sugar of different qualities. It is crowded with all types of parrots." The island of Barbados has been occupied by the English in 1627. "St. Vincent, where the Caribs live, is most populated." Price: Euro 975,-

975 EUR

- Jalousie - Eugène Grasset, 1897 - Jalousie [Jealousy], lithograph designed by Eugène Grasset in 1897, published by G. de Malherbe. Size: Ø 68,5 cm. From the series Dix Estampes Decoratives (caracteres de femmes, fleurs emblematiques) published in an edition 750. Eugène Samuel Grasset (1841 -1917) was a Franco-Swiss decorative artist who worked in Paris, France in a variety of creative design fields during the Belle Époque. He is considered a pioneer in Art Nouveau design. He was raised in an artistic environment as the son of a cabinet designer/maker and sculptor. He studied drawing under François Bocion (1828-1890) and went to Zürich in 1861 to study architecture. He became an admirer of Japanese art, which influenced some of his designs. Between 1869 and 1870, Grasset worked as a painter and sculptor in Lausanne. He moved to Paris in 1871 where he designed furniture, fabrics and tapestries as well as ceramics and jewellery. His decorative fine art pieces were crafted from ivory, gold and other precious materials in unique combinations and his creations are considered a cornerstone of Art Nouveau motifs and patterns. In 1877 Eugène Grasset turned to graphic design, producing income-generating products such as postcards and eventually postage stamps for both France and Switzerland. However, it was poster art that quickly became his forte. Some of his works became part of the Maîtres de l'Affiche. Grasset spent much of his latter years teaching in various schools across Paris. Many of his students went on to become eminent artist themselves, unsurprisingly, a lot of them within the Art Nouveau movement. His versatility, instincts and ability not only influenced those whom he had taught, but also prominent artists like Alphonse Mucha, and left a stirring mark on the Arts and artists that followed. Prijs: Euro 1.850,- (incl. lijst)

1,850 EUR

- Froideur - Eugène Grasset, 1897 - Froideur [coldness], lithograph designed by Eugène Grasset in 1897, published by G. de Malherbe. Size: Ø 68,5 cm. From the series Dix Estampes Decoratives (caracteres de femmes, fleurs emblematiques) published in an edition 750. Eugène Samuel Grasset (1841 -1917) was a Franco-Swiss decorative artist who worked in Paris, France in a variety of creative design fields during the Belle Époque. He is considered a pioneer in Art Nouveau design. He was raised in an artistic environment as the son of a cabinet designer/maker and sculptor. He studied drawing under François Bocion (1828-1890) and went to Zürich in 1861 to study architecture. He became an admirer of Japanese art, which influenced some of his designs. Between 1869 and 1870, Grasset worked as a painter and sculptor in Lausanne. He moved to Paris in 1871 where he designed furniture, fabrics and tapestries as well as ceramics and jewellery. His decorative fine art pieces were crafted from ivory, gold and other precious materials in unique combinations and his creations are considered a cornerstone of Art Nouveau motifs and patterns. In 1877 Eugène Grasset turned to graphic design, producing income-generating products such as postcards and eventually postage stamps for both France and Switzerland. However, it was poster art that quickly became his forte. Some of his works became part of the Maîtres de l'Affiche. Grasset spent much of his latter years teaching in various schools across Paris. Many of his students went on to become eminent artist themselves, unsurprisingly, a lot of them within the Art Nouveau movement. His versatility, instincts and ability not only influenced those whom he had taught, but also prominent artists like Alphonse Mucha, and left a stirring mark on the Arts and artists that followed. Prijs: Euro 1.850,- (Incl. frame)

1,850 EUR

- The cyclist - Ackermann/Burckhardt (Weissenburg), 1906 - CYCLING THROUGH THE BELLE ÉPOQUE Folk print, lithograph consisting of three mounted sheets, made in 1906 by René Ackermann in Weissenburg. Size: approx. 163 x 75 cm. In 1885, a bicycle is invented in England that was safer and better than any before it. In 1888, John Dunlop introduces pneumatic tyres. The ladies' bicycle with a step-through frame, comes into vogue in the mid-1890s. The golden age of cycling dawned, which would last until the unstoppable rise of the automobile outstripped the popularity of all other forms of transport. Cycling provided women with a newfound sense of mobility and independence (especially from men). It allowed them to travel greater distances quickly and efficiently, without relying on traditional modes of transportation such as horses or carriages. This newfound freedom opened up opportunities for women and actively pursue employment outside of the house. In 1835, bookseller Jean-Frédéric Wentzel from Weissenburg (Alsace) obtained the Brevet d'Imprimeur Lithographe that allowed him to produce popular prints in lithography. With the possibilities of the new rapid reproduction techniques and cheap labour that coloured the prints, Wentzel managed to build a successful company that sold its products all over Europe. The company is known to have marketed two hundred different prints, large and small, in the years 1860-1861 alone. By 1869, Wentzel owned 18 lithographic presses that allowed him to print up to 400 sheets per day. The 35 colorists who worked there (during a 69-hour week) had an output of as many as 107,000 sheets in year 1870. It was the largest print factory in central Europe. The company was taken over by Charles Burckhardt in 1877 and succeeded by René Ackermann in 1906. Due to competition and the emergence of new techniques such as photography, production declined after the First World War, the company closed in the late 1930s. The depiction of the cycling lady was part of a series of life-size posters that hung for decoration in marquees or at fairs. Ephemeral prints that were lost after single use. While smaller so-called cent prints were collected from the mid-19th century onwards, very few of the large popular prints have survived. Price: Euro 950,-

950 EUR

- Strait of Malacca, Singapore - 1898 - RARE 19TH CENTURY MAP OF THE MALACCA STRAIT WITH SINGAPORE "Malacca Strait with Part of the East Coast of the Malay Peninsula", engraving published in London by the British Admiralty in 30 June 1898 under the superintendence of Rear Admiral Sir W.J.L. Wharton. Size: 65.5 x 98 cm. In 1795 King George III created the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office, to provide top notch nautical charts to the vast Royal Navy. Prior to the founding of the Admiralty the surveying and creation of nautical charts was primarily a commercial venture in which the cartographer himself, more often than not, actually financed the printing of his own material. The great navigator James Cook himself is known to have scrambled for funds to publish his own seminal charts - the most important and advanced of the period. The system of privately funded nautical mapping and publishing left vast portions of the world uncharted and many excellent charts unpublished. King George III, responding to significant loss in trade revenue related to shipwrecks and delay due to poor charts, recognised the need for an institutionalised government sponsored cartographic agency - the Admiralty. The United Kingdom Hydrographic Office is still in operation today. On this large and rare 19th century nautical chart or maritime map we see Peninsula Malaya, Singapore and its neighbouring islands and parts of Sumatra surrounded by the South China Sea and Malacca Strait. In the second half of the 19th century, Singapore was part of the Straits Settlements, a group of British territories in Southeast Asia controlled by the British East India Company and later served as a crown colony. In the 1890s Singapore became a global center for rubber sorting and export. Price: EUR 2.150,-

2,150 EUR

- Malacca Strait, Kuala Lumpur - 1895 - RARE 19TH CENTURY MAP OF THE MALACCA STRAIT WITH KUALA LUMPUR "Malacca Strait Pulo Berhala to Cape Rachada", engraving by Davies & Company published in London by the British Admiralty in 8 October 1895 under the superintendence of Rear Admiral Sir W.J.L. Wharton. Size: 66 x 98 cm. In 1795 King George III created the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office to provide top notch nautical charts to the vast Royal Navy. Prior to the founding of the Admiralty the surveying and creation of nautical charts was primarily a commercial venture in which the cartographer himself, more often than not, actually financed the printing of his own material. The great navigator James Cook himself is known to have scrambled for funds to publish his own seminal charts - the most important and advanced of the period. The system of privately funded nautical mapping and publishing left vast portions of the world uncharted and many excellent charts unpublished. King George III, responding to significant loss in trade revenue related to shipwrecks and delay due to poor charts, recognised the need for an institutionalised government sponsored cartographic agency - the Admiralty. The United Kingdom Hydrographic Office is still in operation today. On this rare and large 19th century nautical chart or maritime map we see the Malay Peninsula with Kuala Lumpur, its neighbouring islands and parts of Sumatra surrounded by the South China Sea and Malacca Strait. Early Kuala Lumpur was a small town that suffered from many social and political problems - the buildings were made of wood and atap (palm frond thatching) that were prone to fire, lack of proper sanitation plagued the town with diseases, and it suffered from a constant threat of flooding. The early Chinese and Malay settlements were along the east bank of the Klang River - the Chinese mainly settled around the commercial center of Market Square; the Malays, later Indian Chettiars and Indian Muslims resided in the Java Street (now Jalan Tun Perak) area. In 1880, the state capital of Selangor was moved from Klang to the more strategically advantageous Kuala Lumpur by the colonial administration, and the British Resident William Bloomfield Douglas then decided that the government buildings and living quarters should be located to the west of the river. The construction of the railway spurred the growth of the city. The population grew from 4,500 in 1884 to 20,000 in 1890. In 1896, Kuala Lumpur was chosen as the capital of the newly formed Federated Malay States. Price: EUR 1.350,-

1,350 EUR

- Asia - Jean-Baptiste Crépy + Jean-Baptiste Nolin, 1781 - RARE AND MONUMENTAL WALL MAP OF ASIA "L'Asie dressée sur les nouvelles observations faites en touttes [sic] les parties de la terre et rectifiées." Copper engraving by Jean-Baptiste Nolin, published in Paris by Jean-Baptiste Crépy in 1781 on 4 central sheets, plus borders. Mounted on linen. Size: approx. 126 x 140 cm. Nolin's map was produced at the junction of the decline of the Dutch dominance of world exploration and cartography and the rise of the British and French. The map consequently provides a fitting bridge between the two eras. Geographically, the map features the Asian continent, including an allegorical cartouche, a geographical and a historical description in the lower decorative border, and 30 vignettes on Asian history rendering an interesting mix of biblical history of Asia Minor, the Tartarian invasion of China, the Crusades with the Sieges of Damietta and Jerusalem etc.Cartographically the map is based upon the work of Nolin's father of the same name. It extends from the Mediterranean to New Guinea and the Japanese Kuril Islands, and from Spitzbergen to Northern Australia. The map is surrounded by elaborate decorative imagery including 30 decorative vignette medallions drawn from Greek, Roman, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic history. The extensive text along the lower margin features a Description Géographique de l'Asie and a Description Historique de l'Asie. In the upper left corner, an especially resplendent cartouche illustrates Jesuit priests evangelizing to the diverse peoples of the continent. While exhibiting extensive confidence and detail throughout, this map is heavily speculative with regards to unexplored territory. Greenland for example, extends eastward north of Spitsbergen almost as far as Nova Zembla, which itself is attached to the Asiatic mainland. India is exceptionally narrow following Nicolas Sanson's model of around 1690. The sea between Japan and Korea, whose name, nowadays either the "Sea of Korea", "east Sea", or the "Sea of Japan", is currently a matter of historical and political dispute between the countries and is here identified in favor of both countries, with both Mer et Golfe de Coree and Mer Septentrionale du Japon applied to the same sea. The map's most speculative sections are in East and Northeast Asia, where, despite being issued after the explorations of Vitus Bering, the cartography here dates to about 1740, due to the fact that Bering's information was not yet widely available outside of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Instead, the cartographer relies on early Dutch records relating to the voyage of Maarten Gerrtisz de Vries and Cornelis Jansz Coen. Here modern day Hokkaido ("Terre d'Yesso"), the southern parts of which are vaguely recognizable, is attached to the Yupi peninsula (Sakhalin). Several islands extending to the northeast, represent De Vries and Coen's discovery of the Japanese Kuril Islands of Kunashir (mapped somewhat accurately) and Iturup. De Vries and Coen's mapping of Iturup does not extend beyond the western shores, so the eastern part of the island remains blank. Some cartographers of the period attached Iturup to a larger land maps identified as "Terre de Gama". Gama, in this case refers to the Portuguese explorer João da Gama (c. 1540 - after 1591), grandson of Vasco de Gama, who reportedly crossed the North Pacific in the 1580s, in the process mapping some of the Kuril Islands, possibly some of the Aleutian Islands, and potentially even part of the American Coast. Gamaland' was subsequently mapped speculatively on many maps. The reality of Gamaland, as presented here by Nolin, is probably a mismapping of several of the Aleutian Islands as a single landmass attached to the American mainland. Here that landmass, identified as "Partie de L'Amerique" is ghosted in suggested a tenuous state of discovery. Just to the north of these islands the Amur River (Yaniour) exhibits a particularly fiery and virulent outflow into the Arctic - suggesting impassibility. The Amur river was explored by the Russian Cossack expedition of Vassili Poyarkov in 1643-44. The Cossacks established the fort of Albazin on the upper Amur, mapped here, at the site of the former capital of the Solon people. When this map was issued, the fort has fallen under the control of the Chinese. Further to the north there is an unusual projection into the Arctic generally known as Witsen's Peninsula. This oddity appears on numerous maps dating from the late 17th and early 19th century. It is a legacy of Peter the Great's obsession over the search for a Northeast Passage. Around 1648 the Cossack Semyon Dezhnev (1605 - 1673) put together a rough and ready expedition to explore the region. His company consisted of Fedot Alekseyev, traveling with the merchants Andreev and Afstaf'iev (representing the Guselnikov merchant house), who provided their own ship, and Gerasim Ankudinov, an experienced sea captain with his own ship and some 30 men. Dezhnev

14,500 EUR

- Chinese fishing bird - after William Alexander, 1796 - "The Pelicanus Sinensis, or Fishing Corovant of China." Copper engraving by W. Skelton after a drawing by William Alexander (1767-1816 ) from the "Authentic account of an embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China; including cursory observations made, and information obtained, in travelling through that ancient empire" written by Sir George Leonard Staunton and published April 12, 1796 in London by G. Nicol. Coloured by a later hand. Size (image): 24,3 x 31 cm. The embassy was headed by Earl George Macartney (1737-1806), who was dispatched to Beijing in 1792. He was accompanied by Staunton a medical doctor as his secretary, and a retinue of suitably impressive size, including Staunton's 11-year-old son who was nominally the ambassador's page. On the embassy's arrival in China it emerged that the 11-year-old was the only European member of the embassy able to speak Mandarin, and thus the only one able to converse with the Emperor. Lord Macartney's embassy was unsuccessful, the Chinese resisting British overtures to establish diplomatic relations in view of opening the vast Chinese realms to free trade, but it opened the way for future British missions, which would eventually lead to the first Opium War and the cession of Hong Kong to Britain in 1842. It also resulted in this invaluable account, prepared at government expense, largely from Lord Macartney's notes, by Staunton, of Chinese manners, customs and artifacts at the height of the Qing dynasty. The engravings are of special interest because of their depiction of subjects that very few Europeans had heard of or seen, showing how advanced Chinese civilisation was on a technical, artistic and organizational level. Staunton writes about the Fishing Cormorant: "The Embassy had not proceeded far on the southern branch of the canal, when they arrived in the vicinity of the place where the Leu-tze, or famed fishing bird of China, is bred, and instructed in the art and practice of supplying his owner with fish in great abundance. It is a species of the pelican, resembling the common corvorant, but distinguished ... as: brown pelican or corvorant, with white throat, 'the body whitish beneath and spotted with brown'; 'the tail rounded; the irides blue; the bill yellow.'" Price: Euro 195,-

195 EUR

- Pheasant of Java - after William Alexander, 1796 - "The Fire-Back Pheasant of Java" Copper engraving by William Skelton after a drawing by William Alexander (1767-1816 ) from the "Authentic account of an embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China; including cursory observations made, and information obtained, in travelling through that ancient empire" written by Sir George Leonard Staunton and published April 12, 1796 in London by G. Nicol. Coloured by a later hand. Size (image): 31 x 24,2 cm. The embassy was headed by Earl George Macartney (1737-1806), who was dispatched to Beijing in 1792. He was accompanied by Staunton a medical doctor as his secretary, and a retinue of suitably impressive size, including Staunton's 11-year-old son who was nominally the ambassador's page. On the embassy's arrival in China it emerged that the 11-year-old was the only European member of the embassy able to speak Mandarin, and thus the only one able to converse with the Emperor. Lord Macartney's embassy was unsuccessful, the Chinese resisting British overtures to establish diplomatic relations in view of opening the vast Chinese realms to free trade, but it opened the way for future British missions, which would eventually lead to the first Opium War and the cession of Hong Kong to Britain in 1842. It also resulted in this invaluable account, prepared at government expense, largely from Lord Macartney's notes, by Staunton, of Chinese manners, customs and artifacts at the height of the Qing dynasty. The engravings are of special interest because of their depiction of subjects that very few Europeans had heard of or seen, showing how advanced Chinese civilisation was on a technical, artistic and organizational level. Price: Euro 195,-

195 EUR

- Chinese water wheel - after William Alexander, 1796 - "Section and Elevation of a Wheel used by the Chinese for Raising Water" Copper engraving by William Skelton after a drawing by William Alexander (1767-1816 ) from the "Authentic account of an embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China; including cursory observations made, and information obtained, in travelling through that ancient empire" written by Sir George Leonard Staunton and published April 12, 1796 in London by G. Nicol. Coloured by a later hand. Size (image): 26,5 x 45 cm. The embassy was headed by Earl George Macartney (1737-1806), who was dispatched to Beijing in 1792. He was accompanied by Staunton a medical doctor as his secretary, and a retinue of suitably impressive size, including Staunton's 11-year-old son who was nominally the ambassador's page. On the embassy's arrival in China it emerged that the 11-year-old was the only European member of the embassy able to speak Mandarin, and thus the only one able to converse with the Emperor. Lord Macartney's embassy was unsuccessful, the Chinese resisting British overtures to establish diplomatic relations in view of opening the vast Chinese realms to free trade, but it opened the way for future British missions, which would eventually lead to the first Opium War and the cession of Hong Kong to Britain in 1842. It also resulted in this invaluable account, prepared at government expense, largely from Lord Macartney's notes, by Staunton, of Chinese manners, customs and artifacts at the height of the Qing dynasty. The engravings are of special interest because of their depiction of subjects that very few Europeans had heard of or seen, showing how advanced Chinese civilisation was on a technical, artistic and organizational level. Staunton describes the irrigation with a water wheel as follows: "To apply the system of irrigation to those plantations, which were on a sandy soil far elevated above the river, it was necessary to raise the water to heights which could not be attained by the means hitherto mentioned to be practised by the Chinese. But the want suggested the resource; and a machine was invented by them, as ingenious in its contrivance, as it was cheap in its materials, easy in its operation, and effectual to its purpose. Two hard-wood posts or uprights were firmly fixed in the bed of the river, in a line perpendicular to its bank. These posts supported the axis, about ten feet in length, of a large and durable wheel, consisting of two unequal rims, the diameter of one of which, closest to the bank, being about fifteen inches shorter than that of the outer rim; but both dipping in the stream, while the opposite segment of the wheel rises above the elevated bank. This double wheel is connected with the axis, and is supported by sixteen or eighteen spokes obliquely inserted near each extremity of the axis, and crossing each other at about two-thirds of their length. They are there strengthened by a concentric circle, and fastened afterwards to the rims: the spokes inserted in the interior extremity of the axis, reaching the outer rim, and those proceeding from the exterior extremity of the same axis, reaching the inner and smaller rim. Between the rims and the crossings of the spokes, is woven a kind of close basket-work, serving as ladleboards or floats, which meeting successively the current of the stream, obey its impulse, and turn round the wheel. To both its rims are attached small tubes or spouts of wood, with an inclination of about twenty-five degrees to the horizon, or to the axis of the wheel. The tubes are closed at their outer extremity, and open at the opposite end. By this position, the tubes which happen in the motion of the wheel to be in the stream with their mouths or open ends uppermost, fill with water. As that segment of the wheel rises, the mouths of the tubes attached to it, alter their relative inclination, but not so much as to let their contents flow out, till such segment of the wheel becomes the top. The mouths of those tubes are then relatively depressed, and pour the water into a wide trough placed on posts, from whence it is conveyed as may be wanted among the canes." Price: Euro 195,-

195 EUR

- Chinese waterman - after William Alexander, 1796 - "Economy of Time and Labor, exemplified in a Chinese Waterman" Copper engraving by P. Medland after a drawing by William Alexander (1767-1816 ) from the "Authentic account of an embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China; including cursory observations made, and information obtained, in travelling through that ancient empire" written by Sir George Leonard Staunton and published April 12, 1796 in London by G. Nicol. Coloured by a later hand. Size (image): 17,9 x 23 cm. The embassy was headed by Earl George Macartney (1737-1806), who was dispatched to Beijing in 1792. He was accompanied by Staunton a medical doctor as his secretary, and a retinue of suitably impressive size, including Staunton's 11-year-old son who was nominally the ambassador's page. On the embassy's arrival in China it emerged that the 11-year-old was the only European member of the embassy able to speak Mandarin, and thus the only one able to converse with the Emperor. Lord Macartney's embassy was unsuccessful, the Chinese resisting British overtures to establish diplomatic relations in view of opening the vast Chinese realms to free trade, but it opened the way for future British missions, which would eventually lead to the first Opium War and the cession of Hong Kong to Britain in 1842. It also resulted in this invaluable account, prepared at government expense, largely from Lord Macartney's notes, by Staunton, of Chinese manners, customs and artifacts at the height of the Qing dynasty. The engravings are of special interest because of their depiction of subjects that very few Europeans had heard of or seen, showing how advanced Chinese civilisation was on a technical, artistic and organizational level. On his journey to Canton Staunton is impressed with the efficiency of the sailors: "The number of craft of all kinds on the part of the river near the city was immense; but they were all conducted without confusion. The watermen were uncommonly expert, and it was not unusual to see a large boat entirely managed by one man, who rowed, sailed, steered, and smoked his pipe at the same time. He held the sheet or strong rope belonging to the sail with one hand, he steered the boat with the other, and with his foot he pulled an oar, which he feathered at every stroke as neatly as could be done by the hand." Price: Euro 195,-

195 EUR

- Cochinchina (Vietnam), Magistrate of Turon (Da Nang) - after William Alexander, 1796 - "A Mandarin or Magistrate of Turon [?à N?ng] attended by his pipe bearer" Copper engraving by J. Caldwall after a drawing by William Alexander (1767-1816 ) from the "Authentic account of an embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China; including cursory observations made, and information obtained, in travelling through that ancient empire" written by Sir George Leonard Staunton and published April 12, 1796 in London by G. Nicol. Coloured by a later hand. Size (image): 22,2 x 17 cm. The embassy was headed by Earl George Macartney (1737-1806), who was dispatched to Beijing in 1792. He was accompanied by Staunton a medical doctor as his secretary, and a retinue of suitably impressive size, including Staunton's 11-year-old son who was nominally the ambassador's page. On the embassy's arrival in China it emerged that the 11-year-old was the only European member of the embassy able to speak Mandarin, and thus the only one able to converse with the Emperor. Lord Macartney's embassy was unsuccessful, the Chinese resisting British overtures to establish diplomatic relations in view of opening the vast Chinese realms to free trade, but it opened the way for future British missions, which would eventually lead to the first Opium War and the cession of Hong Kong to Britain in 1842. It also resulted in this invaluable account, prepared at government expense, largely from Lord Macartney's notes, by Staunton, of Chinese manners, customs and artifacts at the height of the Qing dynasty. The engravings are of special interest because of their depiction of subjects that very few Europeans had heard of or seen, showing how advanced Chinese civilisation was on a technical, artistic and organizational level. Price: Euro 195,-

195 EUR

- World map, wall map- Gobert-Denis Chambon, Jean Janvier, S.G. Longschamps, 1754 - SPECTACULAR WORLD MAP WITH THE STORY OF CREATION "Mappe Monde, contenant les Parties Connues du Globe Terrestre" Copper engraving made by Gobert-Denis Chambon after the work of Guillaime De L'Isle, published in 1754 by Jean Janvier and S.G. Longschamps. Coloured by a later hand. Size: approx. 119 x 148 cm This beautiful world map consists of two hemispheres. The Eastern Hemisphere is being carried by Hercules (with the skin of the Nemean Lion), the Western Hemisphere is carried by Atlas. At the top, title ribbons are held by putti. At the bottom left we see the starry sky from the Northern Hemisphere, in the bottom right there is the sky from the Southern Hemisphere, at the bottom in the middle a so-called armillary sphere in which we see the celestial sphere with the main tropics, as well as images of the Ptolemaic geocentric world system (in which the earth is at the center and surrounded by the planets) and the Copernican system (in which the earth is only one of the planets of our solar system). The history of geography is described below the hemispheres. From ancient history to Claudius Ptolomeus and 'modern' history with Abraham Ortelius and the world projection by Gerard Mercator and of course Nicolas Sanson. The story ends with the subtle message that it was the French that have contributed most to perfecting geography... The map is framed by the Biblical story of Creation: On the first day God divided the light from the darkness. On the second day God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament. On the third day, God allowed the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear. He called the dry land Earth, and the gathering together of the waters He called the Seas. Furthermore, God let the earth put forth grass, herb yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit. On the fourth day God created the lights in the firmament of the heaven, for sun, moon and stars to mark seasons, days, and years. The great light (the sun) ruled the day, the small (the moon) ruled the night. On the fifth day, God was swarming the water with living creatures and flying birds above the earth. And God blessed them, that the birds and the fish might multiply. On the sixth day, God made the beasts of the earth: the cattle, creeping animals, and wild animals. Then God decided to make man, in His own image, to rule over all other creatures. God first created man and secondly man and woman. And God blessed them with the words: "Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it; and rule over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that creepeth upon the earth". At the end of this day, God saw every thing that He had made, and, behold, it was good. In the scene thereafter, we see that Adam and Eve have meanwhile eaten the forbidden fruit. They realised they were naked, they have picked fig leaves and covered themselves with them. Adam and Eve are then chased out of the Garden of Eden. Adam now had to make a living and work on the land, Eve gives birth to two sons Cain and Abel. Cain killed his brother because God accepted Abel's animal offering, but not the offering of Cain, part of the crop of the land. Cain therewith is a warning against sin and its consequences, Abel is the very example of a true believer (hence God's preference for Abel's offering).In the text box "Origine de l'Architechture" we read how Cain builds a city because people have to shelter themselves. In this way people are not only provided for their needs, but also for their comforts. Tools and instruments were needed to build houses and cities, Tubal-Cain and his companions were the first to work with iron. The sound of hammering gave them the idea to make music. Humanity has since invented all kinds of arts that produced the luxury and splendor we know today. But God saw that the people on the earth were bad. Everything they thought up and did was bad. He therefore regretted making the people and decided that He would kill them. Except for Noah, he was the only one who lived the way God wanted. God told him to build an ark for him and his family and one male and one female of all animals. After which came the Great Flood. But after a year, the water sinks and Noah sends a bird. The second time the bird returns with a twig. If the dove is sent out again and does not return, all the inhabitants of the ark can go ashore. Noah then makes an offering to God. Then God makes a rainbow appear in the sky, with the promise that the earth will never be destroyed in this way again. We write the year 1657. Noah's children multiplied and they said let's build a city with a tower of which the top rises to heaven. Let us make sure everyone is in awe of us. Then we will not be scattered all over the earth. But then God descended, observing their city and tower,

17,500 EUR

- Mediterranean Sea - Romeijn de Hooghe + Pieter Mortier, 1694 - THE MOST BEAUTIFUL MAP OF THE MEDITERRANEAN "Carte Nouvelle de la Mer Mediterranee ou sont Exactement Remarques Tous les Ports, Golfes, Rochers, Bancs de Sable &c." Copper engraving on three conjoined sheets made by Romeijn de Hooghe and publihed with privilege by Pieter Mortier of Amsterdam. Copper engraving on 3 conjoined sheets made by Romeijn de Hooghe and publihed with privilege by Pieter Mortier of Amsterdam in 1694. 2nd state of 4. Colored by a later hand. Size: 58,5 x 139 cm. Rare early edition of de Hooghe's monumental chart of the Mediterranean Sea with 38 inset maps and views of the major ports and harbours. It includes numerous galleons and galleys, with allegorical figures and sea monsters embellishing the insets. The chart appeared in a special section of Pieter Mortier's Neptune François, separately titled Cartes Marines a l'Usage des Armées du Roy de la Grande Bretagne. The nine charts in this section, all engraved by De Hooghe himself, are described by Koeman as the "most spectacular type of maritime cartography ever produced in seventeenth century Amsterdam". The chart of the Mediterranean is the largest and most intricately decorated of the nine. The atlas is dedicated to William III (stadholder of the Netherlands and, after the Glorious Revolution of 1688, also king on the British throne). The map of the Mediterranean mentions a certain Hiob de Wildt and shows his family's coat of arms. Dr. Hiob de Wildt (1637-1704) was the first secretary of the Admiralty in Amsterdam, the largest and most powerful of the five Dutch admiralties at the time of the Dutch Republic. The Admiralty was entrusted with equipping the Republic's naval fleet. At the same time De Wildt raised cattle and earned a fortune by supplying the many ships that sailed from Amsterdam with meat. A fine Dutch example of conflicts of interest. Dr. De Wildt lived in a lavish canal house at Herengracht 495 in Amsterdam. Romeijn de Hooghe (1645-1708) from Haarlem, was the most significant and prolific Netherlandish engraver in the second half of the seventeenth century. His oeuvre comprises more than 3500 prints. He kept a studio employing 36 assistants. De Hooghe's work is highly coveted by map and print collectors. The unprecedented size of the atlas and the use of artists such as De Hooghe, made this work one of the most beautiful of the period. Again Koeman calls it the "most expensive sea atlas" of the period, "intended more as a show-piece than something to be used by the pilots at sea". Literature: C. Koeman. Atlantes Neerlandici. Volume IV: Celestial and maritime atlases and pilot books. Amsterdam 1970, p. 423-431 D. de Vries. Chart making is the power and glory of the country', in: Mirror of Empire. Dutch marine art of the seventeenth century. [Minneapolis] 1990, pp. 65-66. R. Putman. Nederlandse Zeekaarten uit de Gouden Eeuw. Abcoude 2005, p. 82-85. Price: Euro 18.500,- (incl. frame)

18,500 EUR

- Sri Lanka - François Valentijn, 1724-1726 - DE VOC OP SRI LANKA "Nieuwe Kaart van het Eyland Ceylon", uit François Valentijn's "Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien", naar het ontwerp van Johan van Leenen, gegraveerd door Jan van Braam en uitgegeven te Dordrecht door Gerard onder de Linden in 1724-1726. Later met de hand gekleurd. Size: 44 x 54.5 cm. Na 22 jaar felle strijd worden de Portugese strijdkrachten door de Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie van Sri Lanka verjaagd en wordt Ceylon in 1658 beschouwd als buitgemaakte territoriale bezitting. De VOC exporteerde van Ceylon kaneel, olifanten, parels (de parelhandel leverde evenals de olifantenhandel zo'n 200.000 gulden per jaar op) en arecanoten. Kaneel was voor de VOC veruit het belangrijkste product omdat het nergens anders geleverd werd. Dé havenplaats van Ceylon was Galle ("Gale" op de kaart rechts). Hoewel klein (er konden maar drie à vier retourschepen in de baai liggen), het feit dat er vele net onderwater liggende klippen waren en de wind er ook niet altijd gunstig was, was Galle toch de beste haven. De rede van Colombo aan de zuidwestkust bood geen bescherming voor de kostbare schepen. Wanneer er in de baai van Galle geen plaats genoeg was, weken de schepen uit naar de baai van Niwella ("Nieb'ella" op de kaart) , zo'n 55 km oostelijker gelegen. Een enkele keer werd eerst Tuticorin (het tegenwoordige Thoothukudi), aan de zuidkust van India, aangedaan door de schepen die uit Nederland kwamen. Tussen de noordkust van Ceylon en het vasteland van India liggen een aantal eilanden, die behoren tot de provincie Jaffna. Kort na de verovering op de Portugezen kregen de voornaamste eilanden de namen van Nederlandse steden. Op de kaart staan daarvan aangegeven: Amsterdam, Middelburg, Leiden, Delft, Hoorn en Enkhuizen. Het eilandje Delft, ca 40 km ten zuidwesten van Jaffna, heeft zijn naam in de loop der eeuwen behouden. Price: Euro 650,-

650 EUR

- Mauritius - François Valentijn, 1724-1726 - "Kaart van het Eyland Mauritius" [map of the island Mauritius], from François Valentijn's "Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien", after a drawing by Johan van Leenen, engraved by Jan van Braam and published in Dordrecht by Gerard onder de Linden in 1724-1726. Colored by a later hand. Size: 43 x 54 cm. Wybrant van Warwijck was the first Dutchman to arrive on Mauritius on September 18, 1598. Van Warwijck had strayed with five ships from the rest of the fleet of the so-called Tweede Schipvaart [second Dutch expedition], trying to reach Madagascar. He is said to have named the green island after Stadtholder Prince Maurice. The Dutch East India Company (VOC) initially only used the island as a refreshment station and did not permanently inhabit it. Mauritius had two good natural harbours suitable for larger ships, in the Northwest "Port de Warwick" (nowadays Port-Louis) and the Southeast. The Northwestern harbour was a sheltered bay and the Southeastern was protected by a series of islands and reefs. Valentijn reports that it was very stormy around February. Mauritius was a fertile island, rich with birds, the most important of which was the dodo for food, turtles and manatees. Pigs, deer and goats were left on the island for meat supply. In the course of the 1630s, the VOC found a permanent settlement necessary to prevent the French or the English from settling there. There were forests of ebony. Cornelis Matelief had planted lemon and orange trees. With the ships rats came to the island, against which in turn cats were released. Dutch colonization started in 1638 and ended in 1710, with a brief interruption between 1658 and 1666. Numerous governors were appointed, but continuous hardships such as cyclones, droughts, pest infestations, lack of food, and illnesses finally took their toll, and the island was definitively abandoned in 1710. Francois Valentijn (1666-1727) was a minister, naturalist and writer who is best known for his Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien [Old and New East-India], a history of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and their activities in the East Indies. Valentijn's maps were among the most accurate and large-scale productions detailing the East Indies thus far published. As VOC officer, Valentijn doubtless had access to VOC manuscript records which he complied into his remarkable collection of maps. In fact, Valentijn's maps are so superior to previous maps that their publication itself is rather surprising. The VOC's policy of extreme secrecy, especially regarding cartographic matters, historically limited publication of their charts. Price: Euro 950,-

950 EUR